Does Overclocking kill your CPU FASTER?

How does it work... does it drain your CPU life faster than if you don't OC it?
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More about does overclocking kill faster
  1. Yes because u are getting more power from it
  2. there is always 2 side to a story. i would say yes and no. even you just run it on stock you are killing it. and if you got a bad chip then it would ide quicker then a OCed CPU. run a CPU in OC form up to a certain point it wont cause too much damge to it. as i have never heard of a CPU die because of overclocking. by the time the CPU die in say like 3 years you will be upgraded before or by then.

    see the point?
  3. I just ordered all the parts for my new PC http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/252624-31-final-gaming-build-please and I plan on OCin' it to 3.0Ghz but I am afraid. This current computer that I'm using is running on stock fans/cooler it's been almost 5 years now and still running great (P4 3.2Ghz Prescott HT)
  4. So, what if you overclock your cpu, but do not overvolt it?
    Also, what if you overvolt the cpu, but it is within the cpu's limits? (i.e. e6xx series range from 1.2-1.5v max)
  5. Yes, overclocking does reduce the life of the processor

    Saying that however, it could reduce it from 50 years down to 25 years or 50 minutes to 25 minutes, you just never know.

    Generally, if you only do moderate overclocks then you should never have any problems with the life of your CPU.
  6. So if I overclock I just need to keep the voltages normal?
  7. It will more rapidly degrade the circuitry and thus raise the chance of errors - even fatal errors. Overvolting and higher heat both contribute to the loss of life-expectancy of your chips. This doesn't mean that your CPU WILL die in a year or anything, it just decreases its mean time to failure. If you only do a mild overclock, you're not likely to see any problems before the CPU is essentially obsolete (as mentioned by other posters).
  8. So long as you operate the processor with the design specs for Voltage and Temperature, there should not be any concern about damaging your CPU over any reasonable life expectancy of the processor.

    http://processorfinder.intel.com/Default.aspx
  9. ragingazn628 said:
    I just ordered all the parts for my new PC http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/252624-31-final-gaming-build-please and I plan on OCin' it to 3.0Ghz but I am afraid. This current computer that I'm using is running on stock fans/cooler it's been almost 5 years now and still running great (P4 3.2Ghz Prescott HT)
    That is a mild OC for the Q6600 with a good aftermarket cooler. With the stock HS it will run a little warm, but it shouldn't be too bad if you aren't running it hard a lot. I'm not sure about the GA-EP series of mobos, but you may even be able to lower your Vcore. Be sure that your stock 775 HS is properly mounted, the pins are hard to get seated properly, and stay that way. You really should get an aftermarket HS with a backing plate, in my opinion.

    You really want to stay away from the high temps, that is what will kill your CPU. You can run Core Temp or Real Temp to keep an eye on the temps. Real Temp will show 5C cooler than Core Temp. The guy involved with Real Temp has used a infrared temp probe and believes that the Tjunction max is 5C lower. These programs can be made to show the same temps by adjusting the offset in either. To be safe from any shortening of the lifespan I would stay below 70C in Core Temp.

    If the Idle temps are high then check the junk push pin mounts, they probably aren't seated properly. After you determine that the idle temps look good, then run Prime95 with small FFTs for 10-15 minutes, keeping a close eye on the core temps. If they go above 70-73C then get an aftermarket HS or possibly better cooling in your case.
  10. A G0 Q6600 should run at 3.0 GHz at default voltage.

    My experience:
    Q6600, GA-EP35-DS3P, TRUE/S-Flex fan, Antec 900 case.
    G0 Q6600 - VID - 1.2625 volts. Runs at 3.0 GHz with stock voltage. Needs 1.30 volts to run at 3.3 GHz. Needs 1.45 volts (droops to 1.40 volts) to run at 3.6 GHz.

    Ambient air temp is about 25 C. At 3.6 GHz, using CoreTemp, idle temp is around 30 - 35 C, Prime95 load is 60 - 65 C.

    Last year, I discarded a P233MMX system that had been OC'd to 333 MHz for the past 8 years. Too old to give away (even here) and I finally decided that I really didn't need a DOS/Win98 box.

    With reasonable judgement and care, the system will become obsolete before the CPU and the rest of the system prematurely fails because of OC'ing.
  11. if you only OC and FSB and not raise the vcore the damage will not be there or as much .

    for a mild OC its best to go with the Artic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro at a very great value price level and performance and noise. this cooler is capable of 3.2Ghz. so your ai of 3Ghz will cool it adaquetly.
  12. Too much heat will also increase electromigration, but high voltage is definitely the big problem.

    jsc, congratulations on that chip, very nice VID.
  13. i have a computer that is 8/9 yrs old with athlon 900MHz processor (ancient!!)
    and its still running fine with only a stock cooler with no ocing. i think the heatsink is about to give out tho. i am building a new comp when i get my parts in a couple of days. good bye laggy, hello blazing speed!!
  14. Just as a quick note I recently watched a show on the the Discovery Channel which explained how processors are made. The show stated that the average microprocessor is built to operate worry free 24 hours a day 7 days a week for 10 standard years, or 3650 days. This is of course within specified limits.

    Each microprocessor is tested at much higher temperatures than is quoted as it's maximum, to test for stability and quality assurance. Those that do not pass are reverted to lower model numbers and speeds and tested again (ie> this is where we get some processors able to run at certain frequencies with certain voltages that are higher than others of the same model.) An example would be the differences in VID ratings per different Q6600's.

    Also note that increased heat, and extreme usage Like (running prime 95 and stressing all cores to 100% for 12 hours solid, can significantly shorten the life span of such an overclocked processor. If you are overvolting your processor you are pushing more power into it than it was designed for.

    Thus at some point and time there must be a failing point. I however have overclocked every processor I have ever owned, and have never fried one or seen one die as a result of this. Although me keeping a processor for more than 2 years has never happend either.

    I would overclock it and start out slowly, build knowledge and get to know your proc and mobo together and how they behave when under stress, and pick something that suits you. Before you know it you'll want something faster and be trading it in anyways.
  15. ragingazn628 said:
    I just ordered all the parts for my new PC http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/252624-31-final-gaming-build-please and I plan on OCin' it to 3.0Ghz but I am afraid. This current computer that I'm using is running on stock fans/cooler it's been almost 5 years now and still running great (P4 3.2Ghz Prescott HT)

    At 3.0(for a Q6600) your cpu will last you a long time(your computer will not even run the net by the time it kills it self, for real quad core and core2 will be line a 80386[OLD] by then). You will most likely not even need any extra voltage(may even be able to drop it a bit).
  16. When a system dies it is almost never the CPU but the MB/PSU and so on.
    When a CPU does die it is almost always due to over voltage/heat.

    All of my OC's are done with high end PSU's and MB's (PC Power & Cooling,DFI) and never have extra voltages on any of the parts.
    See my profile for the "old" systems that have 50% OC on stock volts and air cooling.

    My newer systems that run stock @ 3/3+ Ghz just don't need to be OC'ed as I can't see a boost while playing games.
  17. If it has sufficient cooling it might not die. Look if your running a cpu without a heat sink or fan the chances are high that it burn or turn off every time it overheats, so if you overclock a cpu with proper cooling or with cooling that can deter all the heat your cpu cant die.

    Overclocking isn't the killer its the heat.
    If your going to overclock make sure you buy an aftermarket cpu cooler.
  18. The thing about CPU's is the understanding of their practical life span. CPU's can run for years, i have had some computers for 10 years and they still run! But what is the average practical life span of a CPU, a couple years? 4 years at most for people. I have my over clocked CPU its been fine since i bought it new 3 years ago, and its been over clocked since day 1. I bet it would run for the foreseeable future, but would it be practical to run a processor that's 6 years old, not really. So unless you are really pushing that CPU to the limit with voltage and heat you shouldn't have an issue. Keeps the temps in check and don't go to high on the vCore and CPU life should be the least of your concerns.
  19. its been over a year now and even someone who been running the first batch of Q6600 at 3.4Ghz hasnt reported a dead CPU. maybe that will give you an idea.
  20. Anyone ever run a Cyrix MII? These chips were really 150-200MHz chips that Cyrix (owned at the time by IBM) overclocked to as high as 366MHz. I know of three people who owned one, all three had to have their chip replaced. (oddly enough, all three had the Cyrix 300MHz.)

    Yes, overclocking can shorten the life of your CPU. Usually happens when people push the CPU to far, either with heat or voltage. As long as you keep both in check, you shouldn't really shorten the life of the CPU to much.
  21. It depends how you do it.....

    some are going to OC too much which will shorten the livespan of CPU
    but by the time their CPU dies they've allready bought two different CPU's
    if you're a person that often replaces hardware with newer... (with 1 a 2 year between) you're safe with OC'ing to a certain degree....

    low temps low volts = longer lifespan

    a little OC won't do much harm MOST OF THE TIME!

    so... it's ur risk in the end.
  22. Weighing in on this, I think that overclocking will kill the CPU faster. A geek one time told me, however, that a CPU should last around ten years and even if overclocking cut that in half, had I ever kept a CPU for ten years? No, I usually upgrade every 3-4 years at most, usually less, so the question becomes academic. I did fry a CPU once, an AMD FX-55. It happens, and its one of the risks of overclocking. Sometimes I tell people not to overclock any farther than they can afford. If a person can afford a new CPU without caring about the effects to their bank account, the sky's the limit. If it is really going to hurt, then keep the overclock down.
  23. This is my view on the matter:

    You overclock. That means you are an enthusiast. That further means you're bound to buy a new pc within 3 years because your inner spirit will continue to nag you until you have all the latest hardwares.
  24. As has been said it will shorten the life of a CPU but probably not enough for you to ever notice (as long as you keep heat and voltage at moderate levels).
    I have been doing this for about a dozen years and have not lost 1 CPU, but have lost many motherboards (but all have lasted years before they died). The only thing I have lost to OC'n (at least that I attribute to OC'n) are HD's back on the BX chipset and earlier when there weren't any dividers or bus locks (lost 5 which died before they were 6 months old)but from the 850i on I have only lost 2 IBM Deathstars and 1 WD all which lasted 2 years or more.

    There are two CPUs I ran OCed for 5 years plus (probably closer to 8 for the 600e since I just recently retired it from folding and file server duty when the PS died), my p3 600e @ 900~930 and my 2.4c @ 3.5~3.6 both of which ran 24/7 folding or in the case of the 600e seti for a couple of years first but always 24/7 @ 100% load.

    Here is a shot of my mbm5 log of the 2.4 in action.


    And a few CPUs that ran 3+ years folding (I don't remember for sure how long just know was more than 3) 24/7 (lost due to no decent MB replacements)
    1.6 Northwood p4 @ 2.6
    1.8 Northwood p4 @ 2.4
    2.26 Northwood p4 @ 2.7
    Another 2.4c @ 3.2~3.4 (still going in my daughters puter @ 3.2 but no longer folds and only used a few hours a week)
    2x Barton 2500+ @ 2.5

    And I would guess another dozen earlier ones that ran a couple years starting with a Pentium 200 (My p90 wouldn't even do 100 and a k6 233 that wouldn't go any higher either are the only two that I ever had that wouldn't OC at least 15%, most much more)

    I have always had decent heat control with good airflow and good heatsinks(early on Alpha's and later Thermalright's). When I started my 1st case was a SuperMicro 750 AT (I still use the 350 watt PS to test and and bleed my WC system so if any leaks nothing else is powered up) which had 5 80mm and 2 92mm fans and a filter screen on the intake 3 80mm to help with dust control. And my 2nd was a 750a ATX which I setup with the same fans (I just thew that case out today)

    Here is a link to an old review of that case (which was probably the best cases I ever had, and most expensive also at $400 each back in 95 (AT) and 96 (ATX)when I bought them.
    http://arstechnica.com/reviews/1298/sc750a.html

    That is what has been my experience in the hobby of overclocking and like Sailor said if and how far you go depends a lot on your wallet.
  25. Has anyone actually had a CPU fail due to overclocking....?

    I have a celeron 300 running at 450mHz .....for more than 5 years
    a Duron 700 running at 950 mHz .....for more than 5 years
    and currently I have a E2160 running at 3gHz
    Yes it may shorten a CPU's life when you overclock it but the chances of it going up in smoke before its usefull life is over is very slim.

    Just keep it as cool as you can....Don't run it at extream voltages, and you shouldn't have any problems.
  26. OCing may shorten a CPUs life but in my experience (my own, my friends and the experience of hanging around hardware forums since 1996) it just never happens that a CPU dies unless extreme voltages and bus speeds are attempted, or if the cooling system fails. There were maybe a few exceptions here and there but nothing to worry about.

    If you run on OC for ten years then maybe, who knows? Who among us runs a CPU for more than a few years?

    Forget about it and just OC away, sensibly of course.
  27. The real problem is the heat, if you overclock it it will run faster thus the heat the cpu generates will be greater. If you have a good case with good cooling and etc i dont think your cpu might change in lifespan.

    The real wrong doer is the heat.
  28. zenmaster said:
    So long as you operate the processor with the design specs for Voltage and Temperature, there should not be any concern about damaging your CPU over any reasonable life expectancy of the processor.

    http://processorfinder.intel.com/Default.aspx



    This is a good answer.

    I've had my Athlon64 overclocked from 2.0 to 2.5 for almost 3 years. Still running strong.

    If you do it right (safe ranges), then you shouldn't worry about it. Even if it does shorten the life, then you'd be wanting to upgrade to a newer architecture WAAAY before it died anyway.
  29. Theoretically, yes...due to an effect known as "electromigration". see...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromigration

    The potential for this effect is particularly enhanced when overvolting a cpu.
  30. If it was my build I would OC...
    I have never experienced any problems when OC'ing nor has anybody that I know.....
    But if you are running applications that wont benefit from the OC then you can play it safe and leave it stock.

    At the very least I would do as suggested and raise the fsb to a stable OC without raising the vid.
  31. Evilonigiri said:
    This is my view on the matter:

    You overclock. That means you are an enthusiast. That further means you're bound to buy a new pc within 3 years because your inner spirit will continue to nag you until you have all the latest hardwares.


    i think that is damn true. after a year, i start scratching my head wanting a new pc. lol
  32. Zorg said:

    jsc, congratulations on that chip, very nice VID.


    I only recently discovered that the VID varies. Default voltage for my 1st gen E6600 was 1.325 volts. I just thought that the G0 CPU's should run at a lower voltage - you know, nothing special. :o

    Apparently, I did pretty good in the Great CPU Lottery. :bounce:

    Anonymous said:
    Anyone ever run a Cyrix MII? These chips were really 150-200MHz chips that Cyrix (owned at the time by IBM) overclocked to as high as 366MHz. I know of three people who owned one, all three had to have their chip replaced. (oddly enough, all three had the Cyrix 300MHz.)


    To be fair, you have to admit that HSF's have come along way since the Socket 7 days. I suspect that one reason my old P233MMX CPU stayed alive was that I installed the largest aftermarket S370 heatsink I could find.
  33. ejay said:
    Theoretically, yes...due to an effect known as "electromigration". see...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromigration

    The potential for this effect is particularly enhanced when overvolting a cpu.


    i dont think Wikipedia is a reliable source. since it can be edited by me and you and anyone out there.

    even run on dtovk electromigration happens, but its just the rate will go up if you put alot of vcore into it.

    OP i think we have enough reply here to say dont worry about life span of the CPU, just OC away!!!:)
  34. Quote:
    To be fair, you have to admit that HSF's have come along way since the Socket 7 days. I suspect that one reason my old P233MMX CPU stayed alive was that I installed the largest aftermarket S370 heatsink I could find.


    Or the reason it stayed alive was because it wasn't a Cyrix. My mother in law, best friend, and a co worker all had a Cyrix 300. All three chips died. MIL and Co worker replaced it with a P1 233MHz, while the BF replaced his motherboard as well and got a Celery. (266, didn't spring for the 300a, idiot...) Tried talking MIL into a K6-2, but she wanted something that wasn't going to die on her...

    Heatsinks might have come a long way since then, but many feel the same way that I do. The MII's just plain sucked. They were bad chips, prone to dying. Even if you took a modern cooler, or slapped a fan on a Socket 7 heatsink, I doubt you could keep one of those MIIs alive for long. Keeping a Pentium or K6 alive would be a different story. (I used a K6-233 for quite awhile. Not bad, but horrible for multimedia stuff.)
  35. Thanks guys,

    From reading all this I learned that it is crucial to keep temperature and voltages low when OC'ing I just have a few more questions. From Intel's website: http://processorfinder.intel.com/details.aspx?sSpec=SL9UM it shows that you need 0.85V – 1.5V for Q6600 so just don't go over that? I just want it to be at least 3.0Ghz to par with the current E8400 because some say that E8400 will run games faster for now... Also can you guys recommend good heatsinks/fans/coolers? I bought my case and did not have OC'ing in mind or else I would have bought the Antec 300 but this case looks like it has good airflow and slook sleek :sol: - What is the temperature range I should be keeping the CPU when I OC? Idle and at full load.
  36. 1.5v is the max we all recommend you. but the new 45nm should be less.temp keep it under 70C will be fine.
  37. How about coolers and such?
  38. depend what you aiming at.

    for a Q6600 if you decide say no more then 3.2Ghz the ACF7P will survive and keep it under the 70C limit. but then again the cooler the better, the Xigmatech S1283 is the best value for money cooler out there. the TRUE is still holding up pretty well but its a bit costly.

    for a 3Ghz OC both the TRUE and Xiggy is overkill i could say. but keep it cooler then "neccessary" is better right?:)
  39. btw the link you provide is the old stepping B3 which i dont think you can get any more. the new G0 steping is much more user friendly in every way. good luck.
  40. What is the G0 stepping, ACF7P, and TRUE? what about these?

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835233005
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835233001


    - also what about thermal compound? Artic 7?
  41. G0 Is a lower power consuming core2 processor(they did a little tweaking)
    ACFP7 is the Arctic Cooling Freezer Pro 7
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835186134

    True is the Thermalright True 120 heatsink(i think)
  42. hmm and for thermal compound? which should I use are they all the same? Which program to measure your computer temperature
  43. ragingazn628 said:
    hmm and for thermal compound? which should I use are they all the same? Which program to measure your computer temperature
    33-Way Thermal Interface Material Comparison.

    Core Temp and Real Temp, linked in my first post above.
  44. Off topic here but I figure this is a good place to ask, what are the odds of not getting a Q6600 that is G0??

    This is my build at the moment:

    http://secure.newegg.com/WishList/PublicWishDetail.aspx?WishListNumber=7857031&WishListTitle=Xephyr
  45. Xephyr said:
    Off topic here but I figure this is a good place to ask, what are the odds of not getting a Q6600 that is G0??

    This is my build at the moment:

    http://secure.newegg.com/WishList/PublicWishDetail.aspx?WishListNumber=7857031&WishListTitle=Xephyr

    The B3s aren't in production anymore I'm sure, so it's quite difficult to get a B3 if you buy from newegg. I rather think it's impossible.
  46. That is good to hear, thanks!

    I am also planning to OC a Q6600 to 3.0GHZ, is it true that all I need to do is raise the FSB speed and not tamper with any other settings?? (Also disabling spread spectrum)
  47. Zorg said:
    33-Way Thermal Interface Material Comparison.

    Core Temp and Real Temp, linked in my first post above.

    The one thing many people complains about this article is that they did not allow proper cure time for some of the thermal pastes. Whether it affects the outcome or not, this article may be useless to some people.

    For me, it reaffirms that AS5 is still good. :D
  48. If you have others that are relatively recent, then link them and I'll add them in the future. There's always something about every test for the losers of the test to complain about.

    I actually prefer 7 Carat Diamond. It is a little sticky, you need to apply it with a single side razor blade.


    I'd like to see someone to find fault with this test.

    Diamond Thermal Grease Testing

    It's not too expensive either

    IC Diamond 7 Carat Thermal Compound - 1.5 gram
  49. ACF7P is all you need for 3Ghz OC on the Q6600.TRUE is overkill.
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