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Water cooling a C2Q + 2 4870 GPUs

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June 25, 2008 7:15:56 AM

Hello people,

I am interested in water cooling mainly for the silence and some minor overclocking on the CPU part. I would like to cool both my VGAs too (about to go 4870 Cross Fire)

I really like how easy the Thermaltake system is to utilize, and looks liek I will be using there system. However I am not sure if there largest system will be enough to cool a slightely overclocked CPU + 2 VERY hot VGAs. Thsi si the one I am thinking of:

http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Product.aspx?C=1160&ID=16...


Plus two of these for the VGAs:

http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Product.aspx?C=1162&ID=15...

My thinking is system to CPU to VGA1 to VGA2 to system to complete the circuit. Or will the liquid be too hot to adequately cool the second VGA?

Maybe getting two of the smaller systems and using one for the CPU and one for the two VGAs would be better?


Or another solution that is also simple, cost effective and relatively easy to install (low-to medium technical level here)

I have about 350-400 USD assigned to water cooling my system. I am getting the Antec 1200 case is that matters BTW.
June 25, 2008 8:07:50 AM

Why not just get 4870 X2 when it's released, 1 graphics card with 2 GPU's. A quiet HSF for Intel is ACF7P for $26.99. You don't need to water cool graphics cards, the stock will do fine and will probably be quiet. My 8800GT with the single-slot stock cooler is quiet.
June 25, 2008 9:59:33 AM

4870 X2 will not be here for another three months. Stock coolers are anything but quite, the ones of thsi particular model are reportedly VERY noisy and not very efficient at cooling.
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June 25, 2008 11:15:07 AM

Even with only a mild overclock on the CPU and stock GPU clocks... I'm just thinking that thing will be overwhelmed with heat. I think it would work towards your goal of less noise... but the longer your system was on, the higher your temps would go. Every time I read a question like yours I wonder why the manufacturers haven't ever given us an actual number in terms of how much heat a product can dissipate. It should be fairly easy to look up how much heat is being generated by the rig you're building... but there's no telling how much (or little) that watercooling rig is going to be able to dissipate.
a b à CPUs
a c 324 K Overclocking
July 1, 2008 7:08:05 PM

You will be fine, you would be surprised how well a good water kit can dissipate heat from a system. Your 65C load GPU will most likely run idle 35C and load at 40-45C. The idea that your 'hot CPU will only heat up the water and not cool the hot GPUs' is kind of a misperception. The coolant is flowing so fast and water has the ability to absorb a high amount of radiated heat that the temps never really get 'hot' to begin with.

Just stay away from those Aquagate-type bay/pump/rad/res cheapie coolers...they really don't move enough coolant or provide a decent heat exchager to do worth a crap.
July 1, 2008 7:47:44 PM

I have a Q6600 and two 2900s being cooled by a 3x120mm radiator (originally). Added a 120 which made a couple degrees cooler. I also had six fans on the radiator. But you really need just three on the 3x120mm. Adjusting the fan speed barely made a difference.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/247828-29-missing-par...
August 7, 2008 5:40:09 AM

I just wanted to say that although I haven't used the thermaltake products (metioned above) that you may want to consider the koolance cases. I purchased this one since I really didn't at the time feel like putting one together and have been very happy with the end result.

The one I bought was this one : http://pcpowerzone.com/kopcblselico.html?productid=kopc...

HOWEVER they make smaller units closer to the 400 dollar mark you were seeking. So far after 2 years the case has had zero problems, and it keeps my dual core 2.9Ghz EE proc, northbridge, and 2 X1950xtx's at a stabile 32-40 degrees Celcius (idle to game play). It is very quiet and so far on the auto fan setting has seldom revved the fans above setting 3 (out of 10). I bought it knowing that eventually I would upgrade the components to hotter and faster parts over time.
August 7, 2008 8:31:06 AM

There are really only two reasons I can see someone advocating getting any sort of kit like Thermaltake's:

1) That they are just starting out in watercooling and it fits the limitations of their budget
2) They don't know any better or just haven't done the research

Now, understanding what your system is going to consist of - that is - a CPU and 2 single GPU cards - all of which you intend to watercool, there are a few reasons why I wouldn't recommend that Thermaltake kit:

1) The main housing uses a single 120mm rad with a single 120mm fan. You would have to opt for their expansion capabilities (such that they are) to even begin to compensate for the heatload that you will be carrying.

2) Their rads are made of aluminum and their waterblocks are made of copper - while it may take some time for galvanic corrosion to rear its ugly head, do you really want to entrust the protection of your monetary involvement in your rig with products that "could" breakdown - even years from now?

3) Their "high-performance" pump of 500lph really is misleading. Converted to 132gph, it really is on the low-end of the spectrum when compared to more widely used pumps like the MCP655/D5 Laing (1200lph/317gph). Asking that pump to handle multiple waterblocks and rads will be asking too much.

4) While there is nothing wrong with 3/8ID cooling loops, 1/2ID allow for a greater "forgiveness" (because of potential flowrate properties) when involving multiple rads and waterblocks.


Now, if you really do have a budget of $300-$400 for a cooling solution - while it would be closer to the $400 end of that spectrum, you could actually put together a nice cooling loop with 2 dual 120mm rads, 3 waterblocks and a nice pump at 1/2ID which would pave the way for some nice o'clocking.
a b à CPUs
a c 324 K Overclocking
August 7, 2008 1:27:50 PM

Quote:
1) The main housing uses a single 120mm rad with a single 120mm fan. You would have to opt for their expansion capabilities (such that they are) to even begin to compensate for the heatload that you will be carrying.


Yep, fairly large downfall for that system.

Quote:
3) Their "high-performance" pump of 500lph really is misleading. Converted to 132gph, it really is on the low-end of the spectrum when compared to more widely used pumps like the MCP655/D5 Laing (1200lph/317gph). Asking that pump to handle multiple waterblocks and rads will be asking too much.


Probably one of the largest factors. Most manufacturers will post liters per hour instead of gallons per hour on lesser pumps so the 'numbers look bigger'. Most mid to high grade pumps state in gph with lph as well for comparison. Just use a standard conversion table or a site like this:
http://www.sciencemadesimple.com/conversions.html

Quote:
Now, if you really do have a budget of $300-$400 for a cooling solution - while it would be closer to the $400 end of that spectrum, you could actually put together a nice cooling loop with 2 dual 120mm rads, 3 waterblocks and a nice pump at 1/2ID which would pave the way for some nice o'clocking


I second that...probably the best recommendation...hopefully you didn't buy that Thermaltake system already...
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