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HDMI question

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Anonymous
June 12, 2005 2:29:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I am looking at 4 tv's that are HD. Only one has an HDMI input. Is that the
tv I should go with? Does it matter? In the near future I will have the HD
tivo box with HDMI outputs. Thanks.

More about : hdmi question

Anonymous
June 12, 2005 8:04:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I doubt that you could really tell the difference between an HD picture
delivered to your set via HDMI cable vs. one delivered by component cables.
The main purpose of HDMI has to do with copy-protection. On the other hand,
my HDTV has two HDMI inputs and I use both of them, one from a cablebox/DVR
and the other from a DVD player. And it seems to me that a TV with the
features you would want would include HDMI inputs.

More important than HDMI inputs is an internal HD tuner so that you can get
over-the-air HD. That's worth the couple hundred extra bucks you will
probably have to pay, IMO.

mack
austin


"Jim & Ellen Rainey" <raineyjr@charter.net> wrote in message
news:9FXqe.1370$eL5.1145@fe04.lga...
>I am looking at 4 tv's that are HD. Only one has an HDMI input. Is that the
> tv I should go with? Does it matter? In the near future I will have the HD
> tivo box with HDMI outputs. Thanks.
>
>
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 10:42:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jim & Ellen Rainey" <raineyjr@charter.net> wrote:

>I am looking at 4 tv's that are HD. Only one has an HDMI input. Is that the
>tv I should go with? Does it matter? In the near future I will have the HD
>tivo box with HDMI outputs. Thanks.
>
Since you're planning to get a source with HDMI output, you should get
a TV with HDMI input, or at least DVI. The two differ only in the
type of connector (easily fixed with an adapter) and the fact that
HDMI can carry digital audio but DVI can't. If you're handling audio
separately that shouldn't matter.

It's also worth money to get a TV with as many HD inputs as possible:
HDMI or DVI (better yet, one of each), plus one or two sets of
component inputs. You'll want to connect a DVD player to a component
input (much better than composite or S-Video) and you may start
collecting other devices to connect, such as a computer with HD
output. Digital switches are expensive, and you don't want to be
constantly swapping cables.

If you're expecting to get broadcast locals in HD from DirecTV, make
sure the receiver you get can actually do that. The way DirecTV is
planning to add them is NOT compatible with any of their HD STBs of
the past, including the HD TiVo, the last I heard. But I haven't kept
up with DirecTV since I dropped them a few months ago. If you can get
them OTA, that isn't an issue. I believe the HD TiVo includes two OTA
tuners.

Del Mibbler
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Anonymous
June 15, 2005 12:04:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hopefully someone will explain this better than I can......

From what I have read about HDMI is that it is a high definition connection
with copy protection built in. The copy protection is more for the future
when more high defintion DVD equipment is available. Anyway from my
understanding, the copy protection stuff looks at what device it is
connected to, and only allows transmission of the high defintion signal if
the connected device is an approved device. For example, a high def. DVD
would not allow the signal to go to a computer but would allow the signal to
go to a TV. My fear is that with only a DVI connector, I get some high def.
DVD player with HDMI in the future and connect it to my TV and it would not
allow the signal to be transmitted.

Note my Directv HD receiver had a DVI +HDCP connector which is equivalent to
HDMI connector. HDCP is the copy protection stuff.

Again, hopefully someone will explain this better than I can......

noone

"Jim & Ellen Rainey" <raineyjr@charter.net> wrote in message
news:9FXqe.1370$eL5.1145@fe04.lga...
> I am looking at 4 tv's that are HD. Only one has an HDMI input. Is that
the
> tv I should go with? Does it matter? In the near future I will have the HD
> tivo box with HDMI outputs. Thanks.
>
>
Anonymous
June 16, 2005 12:39:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

DVI was an invention of the PC-minded Digital Display Working Group
(http://www.ddwg.org), and had as a design center the RGB colorspace, VESA
PC resolutions, and video only.

Several years later, the CE industry started wanting a digital connection,
so in came a link level protection technology from Intel called
High-bandwidth Digital Content Projection (HDCP) (http://www.digital-cp.com)
and a specification for YCbCr colorspace and DTV resolution modes
(CEA-861-B) (http://www.ce.org/standards/StandardDetails.aspx?Id=142...)
(fyi - video's native colorspace is typically luminance-chrominance, not
RGB) that could be used with DVI. "DVI-HDCP" is often used in product
literature to indicate a DVI connector that supports HDCP, and "DVI-HDTV" is
often used in product literature to indicate a DVI connector that supports
the DTV colorspace/resolutions. As of today, a mix of federal policy and
licensing agreements specify content protection measures for analog and
digital connectors across the range of DVD, terrestrial TV, cable TV and
satellite TV. For uncompressed digital connectors, HDCP is the most widely
specified/required/deployed.

Slightly before the DVI-HDTV/HDCP craze, some members of the CE industry
effectively retrofitted what we knew as DVI and created HDMI
(http://www.hdmi.org). It uses the same underlying signaling and packet
structure as DVI, but comes biased towards the CE colorspace/resolution, and
it is strongly encouraged (not required!) that HDCP accompany HDMI
implementations. HDMI also added support for audio (audio packets slip in
between the video and HDCP-control packets on the same wire), and introduced
2 new compact connector formfactors.

Passive HDMI<->DVI connector cables are do-able, although interoperability
between the HDMI and DVI chipsets is not guaranteed due to colorspace and
resolution differences. For example, not all DVI chipsets support the YCbCr
colorspace, not all HDMI chipsets can correctly do colorspace conversions,
and there is a long standing incompatibility issue with "Extended EDIDs",
where EDIDs are the data-structure that both DVI and HDMI use to communicate
what video modes they support, but beyond the base EDID that can only hold
so much information, both DVI and HDMI defined different extended EDID
datastructures :-( If an audio packet shows up in a DVI chipset, it is
simply ignored.

For the CE industry, DVI-HDTV/HDCP was the dominate digital connector for
about 9-12 months (prior to HDMI existing), but now much of the CE industry
is transitioned over to HDMI. HDMI is the better option, for a variety of
reasons.

For the PC industry, its still a toss-up between DVI-HDTV/HDCP and HDMI/HDCP
(IMHO), and support for such outputs is still trying to happen en masse.

Thomas Gilg

"nonone" <noone@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:sLGre.321464$cg1.97382@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> Hopefully someone will explain this better than I can......
>
> From what I have read about HDMI is that it is a high definition
> connection
> with copy protection built in. The copy protection is more for the future
> when more high defintion DVD equipment is available. Anyway from my
> understanding, the copy protection stuff looks at what device it is
> connected to, and only allows transmission of the high defintion signal if
> the connected device is an approved device. For example, a high def. DVD
> would not allow the signal to go to a computer but would allow the signal
> to
> go to a TV. My fear is that with only a DVI connector, I get some high
> def.
> DVD player with HDMI in the future and connect it to my TV and it would
> not
> allow the signal to be transmitted.
>
> Note my Directv HD receiver had a DVI +HDCP connector which is equivalent
> to
> HDMI connector. HDCP is the copy protection stuff.
>
> Again, hopefully someone will explain this better than I can......
>
> noone
>
> "Jim & Ellen Rainey" <raineyjr@charter.net> wrote in message
> news:9FXqe.1370$eL5.1145@fe04.lga...
>> I am looking at 4 tv's that are HD. Only one has an HDMI input. Is that
> the
>> tv I should go with? Does it matter? In the near future I will have the
>> HD
>> tivo box with HDMI outputs. Thanks.
>>
>>
>
>
!