TIM spill on my Q6600 - Have I killed it? Help!

Hi,

I had a problem with my motherboard and had to take it out to RMA it. while cleaning off the thermal paste on the top of the CPU I managed to stupidly get some on the underside of the chip (I was holding it in my hand at the time). It was only a small amount. It got onto the area of little metal circles that surround the centre but not into the very centre area of the chip. I cleaned it off as best as I could but you can still see where it landed as one of the metal circles is now slightly discoloured. The thermal paste is MX-2.

Have I destroyed the chip? Am I likely to fry the chip and the motherboard when I put it back together? Is it worth taking the risk or is it better to write it off?

All help appreciated.
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More about spill q6600 killed help
  1. You should be fine, if you don't immediately put the CPU back in the socket again. You can buy TIM removal fluid (about 10 bucks), and wipe it off with tissue paper.

    http://www.petrastechshop.com/arsico.html <= something like this
  2. cyberspacegenie said:
    Hi,

    I had a problem with my motherboard and had to take it out to RMA it. while cleaning off the thermal paste on the top of the CPU I managed to stupidly get some on the underside of the chip (I was holding it in my hand at the time). It was only a small amount. It got onto the area of little metal circles that surround the centre but not into the very centre area of the chip. I cleaned it off as best as I could but you can still see where it landed as one of the metal circles is now slightly discoloured. The thermal paste is MX-2.

    Have I destroyed the chip? Am I likely to fry the chip and the motherboard when I put it back together? Is it worth taking the risk or is it better to write it off?

    All help appreciated.


    According to Arctic Cooling, MX-2 is non electrical conductive:
    http://www.arctic-cooling.com/further_prod2.php?idx=149
    "Non-Electrical Conductive"
    So, you can relax, no harm done and no need to risk your CPU with cleaning it...
  3. Even if it is not electrically conductive, you could have a problem if you have completely coated a pin since it might not be able to get contact with the board. Also, I wouldn't want to have that stuff spreading around my motherboard. I would probably attempt to clean it, which I wouldn't think would be so hard since the Q6600 has little pads instead of pins, so less risk bending anything. However, it could still be risky, I don't know how well sealed those packages are and what the chances are of getting fluid inside. It's up to you.
  4. If its not electrically conductive, one or two pins may not get the proper connection. This would render your CPU inoperable. It would be worse if you get TIM on the pins in the socket. This means no more CPU for that board.

    Bottom line: You need to clean the bottom of the CPU as soon as possible, with correct compound.
  5. Thanks guys,

    I have Articlean but didn't think i would be able to use it because it would mean getting the chip wet. Are you saying that is not problem as long as it dries before putting it back on the motherboard?
  6. As for getting your CPU wet?
    I lapped my CPU using water. once it dries... its fine...
    but make sure it is dry...
  7. I remember someone dumped his motherboard into a bucket of water. After drying it completely, it still worked.

    I don't recommend that though...
  8. I'd clean it without using any claning product first, I think getting the underside of the CPU wet is a little risky, just make sure no gold pad is completly covered in TIM and you should be fine.
  9. Evilonigiri said:
    I remember someone dumped his motherboard into a bucket of water. After drying it completely, it still worked.

    I don't recommend that though...

    I had a socket 478 celeron that I put into a cup of water and then froze for 24 hours. When it thawed out and dried off, it still worked fine. OC'ed from 1.7 to 2.93 on air. Don't have it any more, however.
  10. Assembled circuit boards are often washed with water after soldering. Note that the water is filtered and deionized, so it will not leave a residue. Most components are waterproof, or at least water resistant. Just make sure that no residue of any kind is left on the pins, and do NOT get anything in the CPU socket!
  11. Evilonigiri said:
    I remember someone dumped his motherboard into a bucket of water. After drying it completely, it still worked.

    I don't recommend that though...



    yeah I remember one time I pulled clothes from the dryer and a sock that had static on it fell accidentally on a mobo that had the cpu laying on top.

    I pulled it off and I heard some crackles, I plugged it in and it worked for awhile. But the house I had it in burned down... they never did find the reason for the fire. hmm I wonder. :lol:
  12. I would make certain I am grounded, use a new soft bristle toothbrush with the cleaner to scrub the bottom of the chip (gently, gently), repeat with isopropyl alcohol (not rubbing alcohol - it has lanolin added - to remove any cleaner residue, then repeat with distilled water, and air dry over night.

    Previous posters are correct. You DO NOT want to do anything to risk gunking up your motherboard.

    The LGA package is physically pretty rugged. And it let Intel transfer the CPU pin problem to the motherboard manufacturers.
  13. All sorted, CPU and computer doing well. Thanks so much for all your help - it was very greatly appreciated
  14. Most cooling paste are non electrically conductive. So no need to worry about it but to be sure remove them at risky position
  15. I did the same, except it was a S939, when removing my FX-60 to ship after selling it. I just cleaned it off and all was good.
  16. well the good thing about these sockets is even though let say you did not completely remove the thermal paste but got most of it off, Is that the extreme pressure to lock the CPU in place is enough to make contact just as long as the thermal paste is cleaned off as much as possible to the point where it does not get on the pins on the motherboard.

    And depending on the cpu cooling some really get locked down pretty tight on top of the cpu especially the zalman cpu cooling so to make contact with the block as much as possible for better cooling efficiency for the CPU.

    I know when i installed my zalman fan it really presses hard on the cpu to make it secure locked in place. So those 2 factors is enough to really make good contact
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