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Last questions about the E2160 before ordering.

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January 24, 2008 2:14:15 PM


Last questions about the E2160:

1. Will I be able to run the high end games, like Crysis, without OCing? The Crysis requirements say 2.2 or better.

2. I can afford the E2200 if anybody if anybody has any comments on that. And if I stick with the GIGABYTE GA-P35-DS3L for my MB and run a stock fan for awhile I can free up that money toward and even better CPU in the 4000 series.

I will be running the GeForce 8800GT 512MB, with Kingston HyperX 2GB DDR2 800 (PC2 6400). I haven't decided on the MB yet but at least it's down to 2 options. GIGABYTE GA-P35-DS3L or the ASUS P5K-E.

I do want to stay on budget but if I can't run good games with the E2160 or E2200 not clocked, I'll consider the 4000. I am partial to the ASUS P5K-E so I'd be giving that up to.

3. I can save a bit on the 8800GT 256MB but not enough to make it worth it (IMO) I think that's it. I'll be ordering in the next few weeks.

Thanks, in advance.

More about : questions e2160 ordering

January 24, 2008 2:38:09 PM

1. Your're below the minimum, but I would wager it would still run fine since crysis is massively GPU limited. An overclock would help though, and these chips are begging for it.

[Edit] You're not below the minimum ... the 2.2GHz minimum is for a single core variant of the core2 chips - you'd be dual core and thus fine.

2. E2200 vs E2160 ... only difference is the multiplier (11 vs 9). I'd stick with the 2160 and invest the money saved between the two into a good heatsink to help with a good overclock.

Either motherboard will do the job well enough, but i think (and could be mistaken) that the Asus is meant to be the better choice for overclocking.

3. Stick with the 512mb version.
January 24, 2008 2:41:29 PM

Good stuff. Thanks.
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January 24, 2008 2:48:19 PM

Dunkel said:
Good stuff. Thanks.


Coret = Right.

The limiting factor on Crysis is going to be that 8800 GT.

That chip OCs rediculously easy though. All P35s support 333 MHz Bus, so yours is 200. OCing to 266x9 would give you 2.4 GHz and is probably doable before you even install Windows (not that I would though).

Either board you get, you will have OCing support from the OC section of the forums. Pick the one that best suits you and your price range. Looking at that Gigayte... it only has 4 phase power modulation. It would be fine for the dual core but might struggle when/if you drop a quad into it in the future. It is also ATX12V, I prefer EPS12V for more power stability these days (this also means your PSU needs an 8 Pin CPU Power Connector).

You won't regret it either way. To me Asus are a bit easier to OC than Gigabytes as well.
January 24, 2008 3:13:02 PM

I've used the DS3l and think its a solid board. I'd spend the extra couple bucks for the e2200. I've been think of getting this myself. They are likely binned higher than the e2160, and the higher multiplier means you can OC higher with lower fsb. This means you will very likely OC the e2200 higher than a e2160. You should be able to OC the e2200 to 3ghz with the stock cooler. And with a good cooler like the U120X, you could get 3.6ghz.
January 24, 2008 3:36:04 PM

orangegator said:
I've used the DS3l and think its a solid board. I'd spend the extra couple bucks for the e2200. I've been think of getting this myself. They are likely binned higher than the e2160, and the higher multiplier means you can OC higher with lower fsb. This means you will very likely OC the e2200 higher than a e2160. You should be able to OC the e2200 to 3ghz with the stock cooler. And with a good cooler like the U120X, you could get 3.6ghz.


Speaking from experience on the E2200 obviously, not rampant speculation.
January 24, 2008 3:41:11 PM

Any comments on the 4000 series possibility? It seems like a big increase in stock performance at a reasonable price. But I don't know, all my reading has been on MB lately but I just started thinking about shedding some cash to use on the Intel Core 2 Duo E4500 Allendale. Let me know what you think.

If it's not worth it, hey I won't bother. The more I read the more I can justify spending more money. If I wait a month I might be able to get into the 6000 series. So comment on that and I'll be able to make a decision today or tomorrow. Party!
January 24, 2008 3:43:14 PM

orangegator said:
I've used the DS3l and think its a solid board. I'd spend the extra couple bucks for the e2200. I've been think of getting this myself. They are likely binned higher than the e2160, and the higher multiplier means you can OC higher with lower fsb. This means you will very likely OC the e2200 higher than a e2160. You should be able to OC the e2200 to 3ghz with the stock cooler. And with a good cooler like the U120X, you could get 3.6ghz.



So. Not true?
January 24, 2008 3:46:52 PM

Dunkel said:
So. Not true?


You could get 3.6 GHz. You might get a bum chip and get 3.0 GHz. Either way I think a higher FSB = more performance in general so I go with lower multis. In addition to this.. the 65nm process has gotten so nuts the binning almost doesn't matter anymore. Most E2160s could bin as E2200s. We already talked about the E2180 issue and how it's odd the 2160 seems to OC better on average. I just don't see the reason to spend more money when the same OCs are achievable (within 100-200 MHz). Such as.. why would I have gotten a Q6700 at an extra $200 when it would OC to the same relative point as my Q6600 on air.

Anyways.. The E4x00 series offers 3-5% improvement clock for clock over the E2xx0 series. I don't think it's worth it if you are willing to overclock.

You had a budget, stick to it. P5K-E and an E2160 will go great together.
January 24, 2008 3:57:34 PM

The grand finale.

Why such a big price diff between the E6550 Conroe 2.33GHz at $169 and the Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 Conroe 2.4GHz at $229.
January 24, 2008 3:59:22 PM

Because the E6600 is old and they want to get rid of them. Also it has a 1066 FSB= better for OCing
January 24, 2008 4:01:38 PM

Almost Silver...

The E6600 was bought in quantities of 1000 when it was released. It was released at a higher price than the E6550. The E6550 was released recently as a G0 stepping and the tray price as much lower.

If a retailer drops the price on the E6600 they will lose money if they sell it below cost. They would rather hold stock than sell below cost as eventually people will buy them.
January 24, 2008 4:04:58 PM

My bad, forgot to mention that part :kaola: 
January 24, 2008 4:37:35 PM

Also, Don't be afraid to OC.
You can do it very safely.
Especially if you use a modest OC.

Examle - Set your Memory Ratio to 1:1 on the E2160 and bump the FSB from 200 to 333. You Motherboard will be working at rated speeds, your RAM a little under and your CPU will be running at 3.0Ghz which is far from pushing that chip.
January 24, 2008 5:19:51 PM

cnumartyr said:
Speaking from experience on the E2200 obviously, not rampant speculation.

Speaking out your a$$ obviously...
cnumartyr said:
You could get 3.6 GHz. You might get a bum chip and get 3.0 GHz.

Shooting for the King of the Obvious crown I see.
cnumartyr said:
Such as.. why would I have gotten a Q6700 at an extra $200 when it would OC to the same relative point as my Q6600 on

There's a big difference between spending an extra $20 than an extra $200. (Yeah, I know, my turn to state the obvious.) Plus the 11x maximum multiplier of the e2200 gives you more options to try to reach a maximum overclock.
January 24, 2008 5:25:48 PM

Really? Was I? Because I'm pretty sure you were when you said how the E2200 OCs. Unless of course you own one.

I had the Captain Obvious title already. I don't need it from you, it'll be ok.

Edit: And the reason I said that, is this guy is new to OCing. He might not know.

More options huh? Like... 272*11, 300*10, or 333x9. I'll give you 2 guesses which would offer the most performance in synthetic read/write memory benchmarks.

By the way, have you happen to read or seen the potential problems some people have had with the E2180 or did you just ignore it? It's not like Intel changed the chip. The E2200 Bin has been there all along. It's the same M0 stepping as it always has been. They just decided to offer another level of competition.

And no, there isn't a big difference. If you are looking at a budget mine might allow me to spend an extra $200, his might not let him spend an extra $20. Also it's only $15 (nit picking I know). However it's still money wasted.
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