Seagate hard drive repair

Hello,
My computer crashed and won't boot up even with a boot disc. is there any way to recover my photos and music that was stored.
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More about seagate hard drive repair
  1. The answer to this question really depends on how dead the drive is. If your hard drive platters are still spinning it is possible to recover data on your own. If not, then you're looking at having to send it in to a professional data recovery service.
    Really, what you'll need if your hard drive is still spinning is another computer that you can setup your failing drive as a slave drive. You might be able to just hook it up to the secondary system and pull your information off of it.

    To do this you need to remove your hard drive from your current system, and install it into the secondary system. If it is an IDE drive then you will have to configure the pin-outs so that your current hard drive is set to Master and your failing hard drive is set to Slave, or you can set them both to cable select and just have them plugged in correctly. If it is SATA you don't have to worry about pinouts. You will need to make sure that you are booting to the correct drive though, if you try to boot to the failing drive on the secondary computer it will more than likely blue-screen. Once booted you can look at My Computer and see if your failing drive shows up as an extra storage drive. If it does just attempt to copy off your files, make sure you have them prioritized though as there is no telling how long your failing drive will last.

    If you are able to get information off that's great. However, sometimes a failing drive will show up as un-formatted and then you have to look at getting software to attempt recovery of information. There are some good freeware data recovery programs out there just search and you'll find some.
  2. wait, did you say "won't boot up even with a boot disc"? What kind of boot disk? A bootable CD? Then your hard drive has nothing to do with it.
  3. devt333 said:
    wait, did you say "won't boot up even with a boot disc"? What kind of boot disk? A bootable CD? Then your hard drive has nothing to do with it.


    Too true - we need more details. Just how far does it go towards booting before it stops? Does it not even show any signs of life? Could be the power supply unit has failed. Either way, your files are in no danger at this stage.

    If you only tried one bootable CD, try to find another to prove it wasn't the disk that was flawed - you can download and burn PCLinuxOS from http://www.pclinuxos.com and run it as a LiveCD if there's any life in the machine at all. You can also use that to back door into Windows and rescue your files.
  4. Usually, you can remove the hard drive and install it as a second drive in a working XP computer.
    Drag the files off of the damaged drive onto the working functional drive, then make yourself a backup.

    For further suggestions:
    What kind of make and model computer do you have?
    What is the model of the hard drive?
  5. hello,

    you want to recover your data . you have to download recuva software & through this you can recover your important data. it is very easy to use this software.


    regards,

    purushottamaher
  6. Did I mention that there were some seagate drives with defect firmware?
  7. redmanded said:
    Hello,
    My computer crashed and won't boot up even with a boot disc. is there any way to recover my photos and music that was stored.


    You didn't say what brand/model hard drive you have a problem with. I'll tell what to expect if it is Seagate drive:

    If your computer hangs during startup, I mean *really* hangs, to the point it won't complete the POST test, dis-connect the Seagate hard drive and try again.
    If it completes POST (Power On Self Test) and continues to the point that it all dies due to lack of a hard drive, then your Seagate drive has failed, probably at the firmware level.
    If it is dead, you may experience one of the following problems,


    BIOS hangs at startup, (drive has "busy" error, drive won't tell what it is, BIOS is dead waiting for response from drive)
    BIOS reports drive is there but it has only 0 bytes capacity
    BIOS finds drive, but can't boot from that drive because password is wrong (there is no password, but it is still wrong anyway)

    If you have any of these errors, your drive still has all data, but firmware error has you locked out. There are many articles on the web telling how to restore your drive. I haven't seen one yet that was truthful. Most (all?) of these so-called "fixes" will finish off your drive and it will indeed be dead. You'll need to find the elusive needle in the haystack; a person with HD Doctor by Salvation Data. The drive can be fixed in about 2 minutes and a new BIOS update installed that won't die again in the future.
  8. or... you take a motherboard off a known good drive of the same model and revision, and use it (replace failed board with it) only to salvage your data.
  9. devt333 said:
    or... you take a motherboard off a known good drive of the same model and revision, and use it (replace failed board with it) only to salvage your data.



    When a Seagate drive fails due to a firmware failure, there is No data recovery until it is fixed, no matter what system board it is plugged into.
    The problem is not the mainboard failed, it is the drive that fails.

    redmanded reported the computer cannot even boot from a boot disk. This suggest a locked hard drive, with the first error I mentioned. The bios will sit there forever waiting for the drive to report it's characteristics and not advance to enable booting from another device. He can/should try the drive in another system to verify the drive is indeed locked or not. I do not rule out the possibility of a problem with the mainboard,
  10. tigsounds said:
    [#1d00ff]When a Seagate drive fails due to a firmware failure, there is No data recovery until it is fixed, no matter what system board it is plugged into.
    The problem is not the mainboard failed, it is the drive that fails.



    I think devt333 is talking about the hard drive's own circuit Board and it's a valid suggestion. I always keep circuit boards from drives I scrap and they often come in handy to rescue data from other drives of the same make and type. As to BIOS refusing to boot from a CD because it can't find the hard disk, a Linux LiveCD would soon prove or trash that idea.
  11. Saga Lout said:
    I think devt333 is talking about the hard drive's own circuit Board and it's a valid suggestion. I always keep circuit boards from drives I scrap and they often come in handy to rescue data from other drives of the same make and type. As to BIOS refusing to boot from a CD because it can't find the hard disk, a Linux LiveCD would soon prove or trash that idea.



    Bad idea. There is a wealth of drive-specific data stored on the drive PCB that is used for that particular drive. Using another PCB will cause that board to attempt to run the drive based on info it has concerning a different drive and make changes as a result that can (will) make any future data recovery impossible. 20 years ago, this would be a possibility, but no longer.
  12. Saga Lout said:
    I think devt333 is talking about the hard drive's own circuit Board and it's a valid suggestion. I always keep circuit boards from drives I scrap and they often come in handy to rescue data from other drives of the same make and type. As to BIOS refusing to boot from a CD because it can't find the hard disk, a Linux LiveCD would soon prove or trash that idea.



    You missed something here when saying to boot a Linux LiveCD. The problem is when a Seagate drive is locked, the BIOS will never get to the point of booting that CD, it has the computer in an endless-loop state, waiting for the drive to become ready.
  13. Bad idea.


    [#002eff]

    Can't be a bad idea if it works every time I do it. The locked drive theory is only yours - the OP hasn't come back to say that's the problem.


  14. Can't be a bad idea if it works every time I do it. The locked drive theory is only yours - the OP hasn't come back to say that's the problem.


    Yes, it is only a theory, one that has been valid for as many Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 ,7200.12, drives sold, and thousands of 7200.13's that were sold.

    I stand by my words that it is not possible to put a different controller board in these drives and expect it to work. I do own the HD Doctor by Salvation Data, I have been to their training classes and seminars. I still go to them. I know it is foolish at best to do such a thing.
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