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Xigmatek HDT-S1283 on a E8400 in a P5Q-E

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July 15, 2008 7:36:57 AM

Went quite well. I thought I would provide some pics for the several folks looking into this. There wasn't even a question about clearance in my Silverstone TJ09... I was able to attach it to the slide out tray and slide it right in.

I used a Xig bracket as well.







Kinda odd, BIOS reports the CPU temp as below ambient. (Room temp was 73F)




Idle temps in XP are 31c CPU, and 30c MB. My case internal temp gauge is showing 24c.

Now to stress it.... :heink: 
July 15, 2008 7:41:21 AM

Hurry! Some of us wanna see this big mother-farking fan/HS under stress. You should have said it was because I asked you to, that would've made me feel good. ^^
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July 16, 2008 10:37:56 AM

I had quite a bit of trouble. Crysis won't run on this board. Something about the drivers or hardware set off the copy protection.

The OCZ reapers will not run at anything over 400Mhz @1.88v... well, let me qualify that. I can boot and do simple tasks in XP all the way up to 566Mhz @2.2v, but gaming is out and running the RAM at 1333 is about only good for a min or two before BSOD.

So, it took me a while to find ways to stress the CPU. I have a few hours in with CoD4 at stock CPU speeds, and AOC seems stable now.

So far max CPU core reported by the ASUS Probe is 30c. Right now it's reporting 17c, far cooler than the ambient temp in the room though.

I just DLed Core Temp, and that shows a Tj. max of 105 and both cores at 38c... seems a bit extreme.
Related resources
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July 16, 2008 11:24:18 AM

Okie well, can't seem to stress out the CPU much... Pushed hard but they only went up 9c at the most. Core temp reported 47c at 95% load, ASUS said 26, another pgm I grabbed went from 32 to about 39 or 40.

My true Tcase must be about +5, so realistically we're looking at about 22 idle Tcase and 38 idle cores, 31 max Tcase and 47 max cores, which works out about right.

July 16, 2008 12:08:47 PM

I just OC'ed my E6550 from 2.33GHz to 2.6GHz on stock. Considering it was my first OC, I feel good. About to leave it on Prime95 all night. Temps max at 62C. When I pickup the Q6600 and that same cooler as you, it'll be fun :D 

Good luck, you'll get there eventually!

July 16, 2008 5:24:27 PM

I'm getting this exact CPu and heatsink, though the P5E mobo. It looks like the 1283 is barely fitting next to the mobo heatsinks. How hard was it to install and fit?

Also, where do you think would be a nice and stable overclock for the 8400? I'm sort of new to OCing so I don't want to push it without knowing what I'm doing.
July 16, 2008 7:53:25 PM

any news on a overclock for your set up yet Proximon?

I've literally today ordered the same board/cpu/ram :D  wondered what sort of speeds your up to at the moment.
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July 16, 2008 8:33:43 PM

Gah don't order that OCZ kit with this board! It's pretty and all but it won't clock at anything over 800, stably.

From my extensive reading I'm guessing Corsair is the most compatible with this board.



cixelsyD87 said:
I'm getting this exact CPu and heatsink, though the P5E mobo. It looks like the 1283 is barely fitting next to the mobo heatsinks. How hard was it to install and fit?

Also, where do you think would be a nice and stable overclock for the 8400? I'm sort of new to OCing so I don't want to push it without knowing what I'm doing.


I would not say it was tight anywhere. Just the fan is about 1/4" from the northbridge HS. There is no "fitting" involved. Just orient the cooler so that the center heatpipe runs between the two cores, rather than across. (Quad core CPUs are best done in the other direction)

There are tiny grooves in between the heatpipes on the base. I recommend filling these in with your TIM. Remove all excess. I was using a razor blade to spread and remove the AC5, just working it around until I had the grooves full and no excess on the rest. Then three very thin lines of TIM down each pipe (it's like using your AC5 syringe like a pen), about half the length of the contact areas on each pipe, centered.

The bracket sticks to the back of the board, you bolt the bolt kit onto the cooler, apply TIM, bolt it down. After the Cooler is completely tightened down, you install the fan. Pulling the little rubber dealy through the fan bolt hole takes a little finger strength and patience, then attaching the fan to the cooler is a matter of finding ways to use a little force without bending fins or cutting yourself.

I would say the entire CPU heatsink process took me from 15-20 minutes. By far the longest time I have ever spent on one since I built my first comp in '94. I'm reasonably mechanical. If I had to do it again it would take me more like 10-12 minutes.
July 16, 2008 8:39:28 PM

I only got it because it was on offer at the time, i dont intend to take the RAM too high really... but i will be looking at the dominator at a later date, read all the reviews, just couldnt spare that extra £50 at this moment in time..... and didnt want to have the board and CPU sat there staring at me for another 2 week... hate waiting for stuff lol
July 16, 2008 8:46:55 PM

Hey proximon when you applied the TIM did you apply it to first the grooves, then on the heatpipes, and then more on the CPU? Is that excessive?
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July 16, 2008 9:34:20 PM

cixelsyD87 said:
Hey proximon when you applied the TIM did you apply it to first the grooves, then on the heatpipes, and then more on the CPU? Is that excessive?


Wow yes that would be excessive to the extreme.

-Fill in the grooves and scrape everything off with a razor, leaving full grooves.
-Apply only to heatpipes as described.
-Put nothing extra on the CPU.

Remember, your goal here is the least amount of TIM possible! Good TIM spreads VERY thin... far more than you imagine.

If you are really unsure, bolt down the cooler then remove it again and inspect how the TIM spread. Once you do that you'll want to scrape it off again, clean up the CPU, then re-apply.

Remember, a hair or even microscopic particles could mess this up. Don't leave TIM exposed to the air for any length of time.
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July 16, 2008 9:44:52 PM

Ok here is my OC. This is as far as I ever intended to take this CPU. I'm in it for stability and longevity.

All I changed from my standard set up was to up the FSB from 333 to 400. Once I did that the RAM had changed, so I had to reset that to 801Mhz. I left the CPU voltage on auto. My RAM is currently set to 1.86v.

Here is a screen of various numbers while running Prime95. The maximum Core Temp reported was 58c on core 0, briefly during one test. Mostly it was maxxed at 56, as shown. I think Tj. Max of 105c is a bit excessive, but whatever :)  That's the way the author of Core Temp wants it.

I intend to leave everything just like that.

July 16, 2008 11:51:27 PM

Nice, this is probably exactly what I'll do if I get the 8400..it's competing with the 6600 since they're the same price.

What's the Tj Max (I'm noob at OC)?
July 17, 2008 12:15:23 AM

Thanks for all the updates, Prox. I'll be using that cooler too, but on a Q6600 :D 
a b à CPUs
July 17, 2008 12:29:27 AM

cixelsyD87 said:
Nice, this is probably exactly what I'll do if I get the 8400..it's competing with the 6600 since they're the same price.

What's the Tj Max (I'm noob at OC)?


Think of Tj. Max as a way of calibrating the actual core temps. The signals from the core sensors don't really tell you anything until you assign a Tj. Max.

This is probably the most informative paper you'll find anywhere on the internet about modern Intel CPU temps:

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/221745-29-core-quad-temperature-guide

Well worth taking an hour to dig through it and really understand.


One last thing:
If I had my memory a bit more flexible and was willing, I have no doubt I could get well over 4Ghz stable with this set up. The P45 chipset is going to be very nice once the drivers and BIOSes mature.
July 17, 2008 1:40:42 AM

In my potential rig I have an asus x48 mobo right now but I noticed the P48 is a lot cheaper but doesn't seem that much different. I don't need a 2nd ethernet port and I hear that 2x16 vs 2x8 doesn't make a huge difference (is that true?). So the last thing I guess is overclocking and temp control. Any recommendations? The P48 board is almost 100 bucks cheaper...
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July 17, 2008 1:53:08 AM

As far as 2x8, most people seem to be holding judgment on what the performance hit will be, but there will be some. Waiting for drivers to mature a bit with ATI and the P45 makers.

x48: better (maybe only slightly) CF graphics performance, mature drivers, well tested memory configs.

P45: Ultimately better OCer, nice board cooling, possible 16gigs RAM. Immature drivers, more memory hassles until different configs are fully tested.

Probably if I was planning on getting the most FPS I could I would have gone with x48.
July 18, 2008 5:08:15 AM

When you said to apply the heatsink across the cores do you mean do apply it so that the heatpipes are vertical or horizontal when the processor is orientated like this:

http://www.arcticsilver.com/pdf/appinstruct/as5/ins_as5_intel_dual_wcap.pdf

Edit:clarification: In the image in the arctic silver guide it shows a vertical box that contains the cores, my question is if the cores are thin and to the right/left of each other, or wider and on top/below one another.
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July 18, 2008 5:25:59 AM

Let me see if I can find the reference for you....

Ok I'm a bit suprised. I thought a dual core looked a bit different, but that's right. I think based on that it will be pretty obvious how you want the heatpipes to align. The center heatpipe is almost exactly the width of the chip, so it will cover it well.


In other words, your center heatpipe will cover both cores. I thought, based on another diagram I saw, that it was running in between them, and the two outside pipes were the ones working. Either way, that's right. Just right up the center of the CPU, the same as the red line in the AC paper.
July 18, 2008 5:39:38 PM

Thanks very much!
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July 27, 2008 2:21:09 AM

I just wanted to update this a bit and add a more complete description of how I installed this. If anyone disagrees with any of my methods please do not be shy. I'm willing to find a better way. I was asked some questions elsewhere and would rather have this all in the thread where it can be referenced:

First off, download RealTemp and get the numbers from that. This seems to be the most accurate temperature measurement for 45nm cores currently.

If RealTemp reports the cores at 36 or above that's clearly a bad sign, if your room temp is reasonable. If you are in a 30c room, then 36c would be real good :) 

I used AS5. I did not use that exact method. Are you sure it was AS5? Mine was more silver than black.

Here are the exact steps I used to put on my Xigmatek:

I used a one-sided razor blade like this:
http://www.doityourself.com/invt/1995133

I first held the base of the cooler up to eye level and pointed it towards a light source. I then put the edge of the razor onto the surface of the base, moving it around and looking for places where the light shone in-between the razor and base.

Obviously, there are grooves between the pipes and aluminum. These need to be filled -- not because you want the contact in those areas, because the paste will be too thick there for good heat transferal. No, you want those filled so that they interfere minimally with the thermal paste you apply in the following step.

If there are OTHER inconsistencies you find with the razor method, consider lapping or, if serious enough, getting a replacement cooler. I did not feel my cooler needed any lapping.

Before applying any paste, attach your hardware. I used the bracket kit, which I recommend. Push-pins suck.

Filling in the grooves:
I placed a pea sized (small pea, but ya, really) amount of AS5 onto the base of the Xigmatek. I then used the razor to work the paste around, completely filling in the grooves. This takes a little work to get just right. You want the grooves filled in, but no excess on the base anywhere once you are done. There will be some natural "mounding" of the paste that is in the grooves... it will stick up above the level of the base just slightly. Try to minimize that, but you will always have some.
The razor works great on this step to create a flat application and scrape off the excess.

This next step is where I differ with some other folks.

Use your AS5 syringe like a pen and draw three lines down the center of each pipe, not the aluminum. Each line should be about 1/2 the total length of the contact surface. These are thin lines.

Now it's time to mount. Please note that if you got a hair stuck in the paste of some other foreign object between the two surfaces, you are probably hosed and will need to start over.

Obviously, the cooler should be placed gently and precisely so the the bolts line up with the holes. Once in place however, you should gently ROTATE the cooler back and forth. Note that the design of the CPU holder and the cooler will only let you rotate the one or two degrees. That is fine. Do this at least 5 times, then bolt it down.

Do not tighten the bolts clockwise or counter-clockwise. Use a 1-3-2-4 type crisscross pattern and make three or more passes. Never tighten one screw down all the way without first having the others beginning to tighten.

I hope this is of some use. None of these ideas are original to me, just gathered from around the internet and especially here on these forums.

My E8400 is currently OCed to 3.6Ghz. RealTemp shows the minimum core temps at 28c and 30c... they generally run about +7c over ambient room temp.
August 15, 2008 11:25:35 AM

Will this cooler fit in the thermatake tsunami dream case i just purchased both i waiting on fan to arrive in 2 days, i dont care if its a tight fit i just hope it fits, this case seems to be a decent sized mid tower case. I hope it works!
September 4, 2008 11:50:28 AM

I heard this P35 can get 4 gig easy ? any suggestions for a smaller aftermarket cpu cooling solution ?

DFI Lan Party DK P35-T2RS Intel P35 (Socket 775) PCI-Express DDR2 Motherboard
January 11, 2009 2:19:06 AM

I hate to dig up an old thread but i was willing to throw my cooler out till i read proximon's last post. It worked like a charm :) 
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January 12, 2009 6:51:04 PM

Good deal!
April 7, 2009 8:06:49 PM

Is it possible to get just the bracket for the original Xigmatek S1283? I have the original with the clips, and they simple won't go in (and I'm not about to push too hard). I have an Asus P5Q and C2 E8400.
April 8, 2009 6:38:59 PM

Very cool, thank you very much!
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April 9, 2009 11:07:48 AM

You'll get better cooling performance from the Xiggy if you lapp it.

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April 24, 2009 8:32:55 PM

bump
May 21, 2009 5:08:50 PM

Can you mount the cooler so that it blows air out to the back of the chassis, or will it touch the NB cooler?
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May 21, 2009 8:19:13 PM

Works fine either way :) 
May 25, 2009 4:06:16 PM

*** ING MAHOOSIVE! I've got one(despite the fact I am going to upgrade to water cooling) which keeps my O/Ced Q6600 @ 3.6 to 32c

also you've mounted it the wrong way, the fan is supposed to face the fron of the case :D 
May 25, 2009 5:14:44 PM

Proximon said:
Works fine either way :) 


*SNIFF* Only for 775. I picked up the 1284 for my PII 940, and sadly it can only blow up, blocking my first two RAM slots. Only plus is its in an Antec 300, so I get a nice push-pull with the top exhaust.
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May 25, 2009 11:42:47 PM

xtream_ocer_intel_nvidia said:
also you've mounted it the wrong way, the fan is supposed to face the fron of the case :D 


Depends on the airflow in your case :) 

B-Unit said:
*SNIFF* Only for 775. I picked up the 1284 for my PII 940, and sadly it can only blow up, blocking my first two RAM slots. Only plus is its in an Antec 300, so I get a nice push-pull with the top exhaust.


What board are you using? And is the orientation because of the mounting bracket or some other heatsink?

May 25, 2009 11:51:27 PM

Due to the mounting bracket, I guess I hadn't thought as far as this, but can you rotate the bracket on AM* boards?
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May 26, 2009 12:06:57 AM

Don't know.
June 11, 2009 8:26:44 PM

So... Push or pull? That's the question!

I looked at the Xigmatek instructions .PDF on the Xig website, and I've read this thread. But it seems to me there is still one question that remains unanswered.

Regardless of the airflow, whether you go front to back or back to front, there's still the question of whether it is better for the fan to be "pushing" air into the heatsink or "pulling" air through the heatsink.

I don't know about computers, but with cars, "pull" is absolutely better than "push".


BTW, fantastic detailed step-by-step, Proximon. Great for idjits like me! ;) 
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June 12, 2009 3:44:56 AM

You can always test, but as far as I know the nature of computer fans make it far better to push air through the heatsink.
June 12, 2009 3:12:12 PM

LOL - I'd hafta be more motivated than I expect to be to do testing! I'll mount it pushing air thru an' go from there. Stuff's due to hit today!
!