Help with P5N32-E SLI + e8400

I just bought a brand spankin new e8400 Wolfdale and I cant find a BIOS that will run it on my ASUS P5N32-E SLI board. I have tried BIOS 1205 and 1302, both uncompatible. For the time being I put it in my old XFX 680i LT board, and it worked right away with no bios flash. I really want to be able to use it on my Asus, please help.
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  1. sorry mate but it will not work i have that mobo and i looked evry were
  2. for a bios for it and it is a no go
  3. sorry mate but it will not work i have that mobo and i looked evry where for a bios for it wat a bummer
  4. yup, I just talked to Asus tech support, and they will NEVER release a BIOS that will support Wolfdale e8400. The bummer about it was the main selling point on that mobo for me was the big "SUPPORTS 45nm CPU!" emblem on the outside of the box. Tech support tells me that it only supports 1 45nm cpu.
  5. Nvidia chipsets can not deliver the power to intel cpu's. Nvidia underestimated the efficacy of intel cpu's. This is top secret!

    The power required is governed by 2 factors: the thermal profile (125w or upto 150w add water and behind the mobo cooling to boost it) and the power required for maximum speed.

    The 650i can only power quad cores too 2.8-3ghz with 100% stability, the 680i can only do run them at 3.2-3.3ghz. What does a quad have too do with an E8400? The higher the effeciency the more power for max speed at stablity. Your cpu requires more power since its faster and more effecient, it does not get as hot and more power goes into calculations instead of heat.

    power = heat+ work (data cpu calculations)

    With new bios updates the temperature had dropped 4c over 6-9 months, this goes into speed.
    Now take the same cpu's in a 780i and you run 3.6-3.8ghz first try - no hours of fine tuning! Why nvidia mobos have too small power system for the cpu itself. The boxes and cylinders around the cpu - that's why they get so hot!

    The main update in the 780i mobo is not pci-e 2.0! no! Its the beefier power system.

    Nvidia under estimated the efficiency of intel cpu's that's why you can not overclock you mobo.

    Your P5NE32 lacks big enough capacitors mosfets etc - the hinksinks people add too the square boxes around the cpu are too over heaty since the nvidia mobo's are under powered. cooling those boxes increases the power to cpu - amps x voltage! its the amps or the inability to supply the 1.45v current sufficiently.

    you have 2 choices if this is the issue - go with intel or newer 780i

    example: a Pentium speed was a factor of both the thermal profile (they got hot) and maximum speed stability around 4.25-4.5ghz for northwoods and after. With a 560j at 3.6ghz pentium 90nm, at 4.25ghz you an "exponential thermal event" - we call leakage. Electrons stop dead and all energy converts too heat. The temperature of cpu increases and the speed decreases. since lower the temperature the lower the resistance the faster the electrons can travel.

    the electrons in an E8400 can move much freer but they need power - if you keep pumping in electrons they need energy.......

    o boy maybe i got off the subject?
  6. That's odd, according to Asus it is '45nm ready' http://www.asus.com/products.aspx?l1=3&l2=11&l3=495&l4=0&model=1567&modelmenu=1

    So you've definitely tried the latest BIOS? Might be worth emailing Asus...
  7. epsilon84 said:
    That's odd, according to Asus it is '45nm ready' http://www.asus.com/products.aspx?l1=3&l2=11&l3=495&l4=0&model=1567&modelmenu=1

    So you've definitely tried the latest BIOS? Might be worth emailing Asus...



    The board you linked is the Plus which is a 650i board, he is talking about the 680i board here
    http://usa.asus.com/products.aspx?l1=3&l2=11&l3=397&l4=0&model=1459&modelmenu=1

    I was waiting for the same thing. When I built the system, about 10 months ago, my goal was to put a 45nm quad in it when they were available because everything at that time said they would be compatable. This was the same reason I never bought a Q6600 but it's begining to look like my only option. I want to build a new system with Nehalem in about a year so I don't really want to buy a new motherboard just so I can upgrade my CPU. Right now the boards are selling on Ebay for about $60 so I guess I could go that route but it just sucks that we were told it would work and now it doesn't.
  8. I had an old XFX 680i LT board lying around, and my e8400 works perfect in it. I am OC to 3.7ghz, and running stable. I have talked to Asus tech support, and they will never ever release a BIOS for that processor for that mobo(p5n32-E).
  9. OK, this is the correct link for the 680i version:
    http://www.asus.com/products.aspx?l1=3&l2=11&l3=397&l4=0&model=1459&modelmenu=1

    Still says 45nm ready?!
  10. dragonsprayer said:
    Nvidia chipsets can not deliver the power to intel cpu's. Nvidia underestimated the efficacy of intel cpu's. This is top secret!

    The power required is governed by 2 factors: the thermal profile (125w or upto 150w add water and behind the mobo cooling to boost it) and the power required for maximum speed.

    The 650i can only power quad cores too 2.8-3ghz with 100% stability, the 680i can only do run them at 3.2-3.3ghz. What does a quad have too do with an E8400? The higher the effeciency the more power for max speed at stablity. Your cpu requires more power since its faster and more effecient, it does not get as hot and more power goes into calculations instead of heat.

    power = heat+ work (data cpu calculations)


    uh... no. Nvidia chipset does have the required VRM to support both Penryn and Kentsfield. The problem with 680i and 650i is their architecture design. According to Wuzy, it has something to do with GTL reference voltage, and you have to tweak it enough to allow faster overclocks on quads.

    http://www.evga.com/forums/fb.asp?m=224343

    This guy has his 680i with Q6600 @ 4.0Ghz. He also talked about the GTL reference voltage on the A1/T1 version.
    I'm not entirely sure how it works, but I'm certain it has nothing to do with the VRM.

    Afterall, even P965 supports 45nm Penryn.
  11. iancarnage said:
    I just bought a brand spankin new e8400 Wolfdale and I cant find a BIOS that will run it on my ASUS P5N32-E SLI board. I have tried BIOS 1205 and 1302, both uncompatible. For the time being I put it in my old XFX 680i LT board, and it worked right away with no bios flash. I really want to be able to use it on my Asus, please help.


    I'm sorry OP, but you're out of luck. Intel tweaked something in their Penryn right before release, and they didn't send a reference chip to Nvidia to help with the development of BIOS support. You would need an Intel chipset, or Nvidia 7xx chipset to have Penryn support. I would highly recommend an Intel chipset over Nvidia chipset (P35, P45 / X38, X48)
  12. I am running a P5N32-E SLI with an E8400 and 1503 BIOS. It will work. Just get the new BIOS.
  13. lol 10 months too late..
  14. Better late than never. The 1503 has only been out a week. Until a couple days ago I was not sure it was a fix.
  15. OldMarine said:
    Better late than never. The 1503 has only been out a week. Until a couple days ago I was not sure it was a fix.

    Hi,
    I'm a bit late coming to this but I have the P5N32E SLI plus with an Intel E8400.
    I have some overheating showing up on the CPU. The current BIOS is 1002.
    I looked at the Asus site after reading your post but I couldn't find a 1503 BIOS.
    The highest value I saw was 1301.
    Can you advise ?
    Thanks
    Ken Piper
  16. Sorry for my mistake. Your board is a slightly different version ( Must get better glasses !!)
    I see that the 1503 has an upgrade description very similar to the 1104 version for my board.
    Do you have any idea if moving to the 1104 would help me ?
    I guess I'm a bit scared to leap in.
    Regards
    Ken Piper
  17. What is the complete Model Number of the board you have? Are you overclocked now? Have you checked your CPU heat sink for dust clogging? Is the CPU heat sink compound appyed correctly. Is the heat sink fit down well on the CPU and the latches closed properly? Is you fan running up to speed? Is the fan in auto sense CPU temperature (a BIOS setting). Have you changed your CPU voltage setting? Give me a little to work with and I will try to help.
  18. Hi, thank you for your quick response. I hope I can give you the info you want.
    The motherboard model is P5N32 - E SLI Plus ( I don't see any further ID info)
    I'm not overclocking. The Heat sink is firmly located, has good thermal contact and is dust free. The CPU fan is on 100% Duty Cycle Mode at 2250 rpm.
    I haven't modified the CPU volts. The values are Vcore = 1.21v Vtt = 1.15v
    My CPU temp at 'idle' is 55C. It rises to 75C during a video render but then returns fairly quickly to the idle level.
    What I believe is my 'overheating problem' shows up when playing a game - Supreme Commander - Forged Alliance.
    Whilst playing this with several CPU opponents on a large game map I have had lock ups and restarts which I felt was due to CPU overload.
    When I investigated and installed Asus ProbeII it showed me the CPU temperatures I described which were clearly high compared to the Asus Probe defaults and thus I felt confirmed my initial feeling
    My graphics card is a 512Mb GeForce 9600GT
    I don't really know whether 55 'idle' and 75 'working' are acceptable CPU temperatures and so I don't want to do a BIOS change without better guidance
  19. Sorry I have not been very attentive to the thread. I had a thought. I use an E8400. With air cooling and gaming for hours mine never gets over 65 c. I have a 120 mm fan in the back of the case and an 80 mm in the top and 2 120 mm in the front of the case. A vent at the rear of the box for the video cooler. Their is a vent in the door with a duck for the CPU fan. It sounds like you are recirculating hot air from the CPU and video card. I would before I flashed the BIOS put a ducked fan on the CPU and add another exist fan on the top of the box or next to the Video. A Ducked Fan CPU just means that you have a hole in the door with a tube that goes to the fan on top of the CPU. That lets the CPU fan pull cool air form the out side of the case. A vent for the video card could be as simple as holes for the hot air form the video cooler to exit and maybe a duck for the fan on the card.

    Just to be clear. The CPU throttles the speed down if the cpu start to overheat. This means it's hard to lock up a 65 nm or 45 nm CPU. Just be sure it's not disabled in the BIOS. It's there just for over clocking.
    Throttling explained.
    http://www.heise.de/english/IDF-Why-many-system-info-tools-give-incorrect-CPU-temperatures--/newsticker/news/114881

    All this having been said I think you do have a heat problem. But I don't it BIOS related. I think if you don't get above 75 you would be OK. Although that is hot. Tell me about your case fans.
    Thanks
    Jim
  20. OldMarine said:
    Sorry I have not been very attentive to the thread. I had a thought. I use an E8400. With air cooling and gaming for hours mine never gets over 65 c. I have a 120 mm fan in the back of the case and an 80 mm in the top and 2 120 mm in the front of the case. A vent at the rear of the box for the video cooler. Their is a vent in the door with a duck for the CPU fan. It sounds like you are recirculating hot air from the CPU and video card. I would before I flashed the BIOS put a ducked fan on the CPU and add another exist fan on the top of the box or next to the Video. A Ducked Fan CPU just means that you have a hole in the door with a tube that goes to the fan on top of the CPU. That lets the CPU fan pull cool air form the out side of the case. A vent for the video card could be as simple as holes for the hot air form the video cooler to exit and maybe a duck for the fan on the card.

    Just to be clear. The CPU throttles the speed down if the cpu start to overheat. This means it's hard to lock up a 65 nm or 45 nm CPU. Just be sure it's not disabled in the BIOS. It's there just for over clocking.
    Throttling explained.
    http://www.heise.de/english/IDF-Why-many-system-info-tools-give-incorrect-CPU-temperatures--/newsticker/news/114881

    All this having been said I think you do have a heat problem. But I don't it BIOS related. I think if you don't get above 75 you would be OK. Although that is hot. Tell me about your case fans.
    Thanks
    Jim

    Hi there,
    Thanks for the reply. I'm quite happy to put aside the BIOS possibility. I have not seen a temp above 75c (from Asus Probe)
    I have a CoolerMaster case where the front is all mesh.
    The CPU fan is fed by a conical duct from a 3 inch dia. vent in the side.
    A further 4.5inch x 3.5 inch vent is placed below this to provide air to the Graphics card.
    There is one 120mm case fan at the rear.
    My machine is under warranty and went to the suppliers recently for "repair" to cover the problem I have described. When it came back all the readings were exactly the same but it has (so far ?) not locked up or crashed and the supplier states that "the temps are fine".
    Probably I am fretting about nothing but I have just downloaded Real Temp (having read the article on Throttling - thank you) and will be interested to see what it reveals.
    Thank you for your interest and help
    Best Regards
    Ken Piper
  21. OldMarine said:
    Sorry I have not been very attentive to the thread. I had a thought. I use an E8400. With air cooling and gaming for hours mine never gets over 65 c. I have a 120 mm fan in the back of the case and an 80 mm in the top and 2 120 mm in the front of the case. A vent at the rear of the box for the video cooler. Their is a vent in the door with a duck for the CPU fan. It sounds like you are recirculating hot air from the CPU and video card. I would before I flashed the BIOS put a ducked fan on the CPU and add another exist fan on the top of the box or next to the Video. A Ducked Fan CPU just means that you have a hole in the door with a tube that goes to the fan on top of the CPU. That lets the CPU fan pull cool air form the out side of the case. A vent for the video card could be as simple as holes for the hot air form the video cooler to exit and maybe a duck for the fan on the card.

    Just to be clear. The CPU throttles the speed down if the cpu start to overheat. This means it's hard to lock up a 65 nm or 45 nm CPU. Just be sure it's not disabled in the BIOS. It's there just for over clocking.
    Throttling explained.
    http://www.heise.de/english/IDF-Why-many-system-info-tools-give-incorrect-CPU-temperatures--/newsticker/news/114881

    All this having been said I think you do have a heat problem. But I don't it BIOS related. I think if you don't get above 75 you would be OK. Although that is hot. Tell me about your case fans.
    Thanks
    Jim

    Hi Jim,
    Just thought it would be good to add that having installed Real Temp I find the CPU temperature is only 40C (not the 56 reported by Asus Probe) and this rises to just 55C when doing a video render (instead of the 75 reported by Asus Probe)
    Naturally I am getting rid of Asus Probe and I am pleased to tell you that I was worrying about nothing due to being misinformed !!
    Thanks again
    Ken Piper
  22. That's Great news. Better lucky than smart.
    Jim "OldMarine" Metz
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