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44 degrees Celcius.. is that normal in BIOS Idle?

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February 2, 2008 8:41:43 AM

Hi,

I have a question about my CPU temp using the stock Intel Heatsink.

I just built my new computer today. My specs are:

GA-P35-DS3L / E2180 / 2gb 1.8v A-data ddr2800 sticks / Inno3D 7600GT / etc

After successfully putting all the basic parts like vid, cpu, mobo, psu, mem (just for successful post) ... I entered the BIOS ... left the computer running because I ate (about 30 mins) ..

When I came back, I went to PC Health Status and noticed that my cpu is running at

44C = cpu temp

fan speed = 1245rpm
*SMART FAN is enabled


No overclocking was done .. everything is running at stock speed.

I live in asia and its actually hot here .. its about 29-36C weather temp ALL THE TIME .. lol

Is this a normal temp of a CPU, running inside the BIOS (of course, its IDLE)?

This is my first Intel PC (I use AMD usually) ... Please help.

Thank you very much.

More about : degrees celcius normal bios idle

February 2, 2008 10:08:11 AM

Yes, those seem normal for your room temps being 29-36C. That is an aweful warm (36C) room to be in. I can usually stand 79-80F (26-27C) but any higher... ugggg. :lol: 

You may want to turn Smart Fan off to continuously run the fan for lower temps when its at idle. Generally that fan will kick on when it hits a certain temp (say 45C, then when it drops, the fan turns off), but if its already continuously running, then turning that feature off won't make a difference.

Hopefully you have good airflow, if not then cable management, and adding the right fans could help more.

Edit:

Another thought is perhaps get a 3rd party HSF. Something that is generally going to be big. The reason for that, it can help absorb more heat, then the stock one.

And example of that, different CPU:

P4 2.66ghz (533fsb) OC to 3ghz (this was my older system a while back)

Stock Idle 44C
Zalman 7700 44C

Stock Load - 65/68C
Zalman 7700 - 55/58C

Just to give you a general idea.
February 2, 2008 10:35:27 AM

Say.. could you d/l CoreTemp?

That 44C temp you mention, is actually the Tcase temp I'm thinking. That might be to high I'm guessing. Getting the temps off your cores would be a better indication if that stock HSF is on correctly.

Cause I just checked my temp, and the Tcase sensor is at 44/45C with both cores (57C/57C) on load in folding, and my ambient temp is 27C.
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February 2, 2008 10:56:48 AM

Since BIOS don't have any CPU power management drivers, like the OS, it means that power to the internal cpu section cannot be turned on/off when not used, like the ALU, that is not really needed in BIOS but receive full power anyway.

That's why, in BIOS, even when idling, temp will raise higher than in the OS.
February 2, 2008 12:04:00 PM

Thanks for all of your reply. Its very helpful.

Right now, I'm installing the OS (WinXP, halfway done) and im going to run some stress test and stuff ... Is it advisable to disable C1E / EIST / Smart fan (even without overclocking)?

I just removed my antec 120mm from my older PC and put it in this new one .. I havent checked the difference because I'm still installing the OS.

BTW, thanks for the info Pat .. that explains why temps are higher in the BIOS .. ill report temps later after installing xp.

Thanks :D 
February 2, 2008 12:13:42 PM

If you don't care about power savings, you can disable them.

The thing is, with it enabled, it will provide lower heat outputs on the CPU.

So the C1E will adjust/lower vcore voltage, and EIST does the same with voltage, but also changes the multiplier.

Doh.. didn't realize you haven't installed windows. :oops: . o O ( and I should have known while being in the bios will cause higher idle temps vs windows)
February 2, 2008 12:31:12 PM

Grimmy said:
If you don't care about power savings, you can disable them.

The thing is, with it enabled, it will provide lower heat outputs on the CPU.

So the C1E will adjust/lower vcore voltage, and EIST does the same with voltage, but also changes the multiplier.

Doh.. didn't realize you haven't installed windows. :oops: . o O ( and I should have known while being in the bios will cause higher idle temps vs windows)


Ahh .. I think thats a bad thing :D  I wont disable EIST and C1E .. ill just disable smart fan (sometimes it scares me when fan is not spinning .. lol) :D 

Yup .. as soon as I built the PC .. thats it .. I went to BIOS .. ate my food .. went back .. and checked the BIOS again and found out that its 44C :) 

Thanks for your help :D 
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February 2, 2008 12:57:29 PM

hmm with your ambient being so high I'd say thats just fine, meaning that the heatsink is properly mounted.
You'll need good airflow through the case to keep your harddrive(s) 'cool' as well
February 2, 2008 1:26:38 PM

Kari said:
hmm with your ambient being so high I'd say thats just fine, meaning that the heatsink is properly mounted.
You'll need good airflow through the case to keep your harddrive(s) 'cool' as well


Yeah, when I was installing the heatsink .. i cant figure it out at first (since its my first intel) ... I'm kinda afraid of pushing too hard .. i feel like the mobo will break .... I was waiting for one stand to give me a snapping sound but it didn't.. when I pushed harder .. well .. it kinda snapped .. but not as loud as the other 3.

Could that be a problem? I installed the heatsink while the mobo was out of the case.

Thanks
February 2, 2008 1:33:46 PM

Since I had to clean out the dust in my dad's rig, it uses a HS that has the pins.

Basically you want to make sure you have those black nobs turned all the way opposite of the arrows on them. When you set it on the MB, make sure the white clamps go through all the way. Push down on the pin that is hardest to get to (first). For example where the north bridge, my thumb got more room to push down. Then make sure you apply pressure on the center of the HS fan, and press till you hear the click on each pin.

The click is when the black part clips to the white or clear plastic. And if you want to verify that it really is on correctly, you take the MB out and look at the bottom. It should look like:

February 2, 2008 3:56:51 PM

Grimmy said:
Since I had to clean out the dust in my dad's rig, it uses a HS that has the pins.

Basically you want to make sure you have those black nobs turned all the way opposite of the arrows on them. When you set it on the MB, make sure the white clamps go through all the way. Push down on the pin that is hardest to get to (first). For example where the north bridge, my thumb got more room to push down. Then make sure you apply pressure on the center of the HS fan, and press till you hear the click on each pin.

The click is when the black part clips to the white or clear plastic. And if you want to verify that it really is on correctly, you take the MB out and look at the bottom. It should look like:


Hey Grimmy,

Thanks for your help and for the picture. Yes, I think mine pretty much looks like the same. I made sure that all the stands are seated properly. :D  I just didnt hear the last stand to snap as loud as the others. But it seems ok :D 

By the way, I'm using the computer right now :)  .. and its fast!. XP is installed and nothing else .. No AV/Security Suite / Just windows .. and I windows updated it (I'm thinking of using Sp3 beta, but maybe later). I'll reformat to Vista anyway .. so viruses doesnt matter ATM

I'm just going to run this system overnight .. just to make sure that it will be stable. What are the best programs to run to check if this system is stable (even at stock speed)???? Should I use the same programs they use in OCing?

If not, what are the best programs that measure stability at stock speed?

BTW, I made a screenshot of my temps using Speedfan 4.34 beta release 38



Is this bad?

Thanks :D 

EDIT:

I'll add this too:



*Speed step is enabled* .. Should I disable it when running stress test and other stability programs stuff?
February 2, 2008 4:24:06 PM

Dirty_Barry said:
yes.


Yes .. meaning this is bad? :( 

Or should I disable Speedstep when running stability test programs?

I just now realized that my post asks too many questions ... sorry for that. My next posts will be clearer next time :) 

Thanks so much :) 
February 2, 2008 4:36:49 PM

No, you really don't have to, I've done the stress testing with it (speedstep) off and on, with mine OC'd to 3ghz.

You can test it with Orthos or Prime95 (update: Prime95 version 25.4)

You can run a bunch of 3dmark tests as well to stress everything for an hour or so.

If you haven't looked:

HOWTO: Overclock C2Q (Quads) and C2D (Duals) - A Guide v1.4
&
Core 2 Quad and Duo Temperature Guide

That should help ya along. :D 

Edit:

Actually those temps are pretty good for the ambient room temps. :D 
February 3, 2008 4:02:30 AM

hey grimmy

Thanks for the reply and the links :D 

I just ran memtest86 for hours and it passed :D  8 passes

I think ill do some simple stress test .. just to make sure everything is stable

:D 

Thanks for your help!!

EDIT:

I just ran orthos and these are the cpu temps:

*still running at stock speed*





I think im good :)  I dunno though ... but its not reaching 60C while running orthos ..

Are these good for stock? or is too hot?

Thanks again.

February 3, 2008 12:40:44 PM

If those were obtained while the ambient room/PC case temp were around 28/36C, it looks fine to me. If you can, when you want to show your temps to mention your ambient temp.

Most people would just jump to the conclusion that those temps are kinda high for stock, if they didn't read the beginning post.

If you plan on OC'ing, the most (highest temp I'd keep an eye on) I'd go to would prolly be 68C for the cores (stock HS), since your room temps are pretty warm. Other then that, if you could find a big HSF that you could afford, it would be more efficient then the stock. Just not sure what you could get in your area, since I'm in USA.
February 3, 2008 12:44:23 PM

Skimmed through some posts, sorry if this has been said already. But the temp in Bios isn't idling. So it's alright to have higher temps, your actual temperature in the bios will be close to your load temp due to no idling process such as windows' "System Idle Process". So don't fret too much ^_^.

I thought someone would of said this earlier, but skimming through, not many/anyone has. =P.

If this has been covered, just ignore it =P.
February 3, 2008 9:37:33 PM

Thanks guys :)  I'm now relieved ..

Too bad Grimmy, I was in the US before (1 week ago / I was there for 3 months) .. as a matter of fact, I bought all of my computer parts there (Clubit/Newegg/mwave) .. however, I didn't buy a bigger HFS .. I should have!!! My BIG mistake .. :( (

Anyway, thanks for your help guys .. I think ill be fine. I hope I'll never bump into any other problems since this system is new. .. I'm kinda scared to OC it .. I dont want to break it because of the warranty .. shipping parts to the US from our country is more expensive that the part itself .. lol ..

Parts here are too expensive and also obsolete :( 

I hope I can get a good HFS deal .. thanks again!!!
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