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CPU Temperature problem

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February 3, 2008 7:25:25 PM

I have a P4 3.00GHz ... have had it for over 4 years and still love it, does me just good!

now, I remember a long while ago that the CPU temp was around the 50 mark....but now it seems to be around the 80 mark!

What is the normal temp or good running temp for this proc? What can I do to make it cooler?

It's not in a corner or anything at all....

Thanks.
February 3, 2008 7:32:14 PM

Get the dust out of the heat sink. Clean off all of the old thermal paste that is probably by now a solid crusty mess. Apply new top of the line thermal paste making sure to work it in nicely. You should see a good temp decrease if that was the problem. You don't want to break 70. 60's are getting high. If you are at 80 you should do this right away before you get thermal damage.
February 3, 2008 7:48:57 PM

Thanks....shall do
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February 3, 2008 9:19:33 PM

hmmm. lemme upload a pic of how much i cleaned up that CPU FAN!

getting it out from the module was hard, but im so worried and scared that I may have damaged it :( 

basically, the "lever" was still down but the entire CPU itself came off/out with the fan....the CPU is stuck with the fan (probably because of the thermal paste)

but would I have damaged it? I really hope not because .... well, its my baby!

I just dont wanna put it back in and risk causing some harm to any components or a fire or something start.... i really hope not.

the CPU is stuck to the fan, what should I do? Can I just pull it off carefully, then clean out the existing paste and apply new paste on the CPU?

February 3, 2008 9:53:27 PM

thats what happened when i took my old p4 northwood apart just twist the cpu off, clean and reassemble
February 3, 2008 10:03:42 PM

thing is, its really stuck...and im too scared to force it apart from the fan incase if the board seperates...... of all days, had to be today and its my main computer - in very high use!
February 3, 2008 10:17:29 PM

Holy SH*T. That is one filthy sob. Umm....yeah I don't know about the socket / CPU. Nothing broke off did it? Does everything look in order? Nothing was left behind in the socket? I have my fingers crossed for you that nothing happened.

You should be able to take the fan off as well if you need to clean it even further. Vacuums work well to get dust out of the sinks. I would attempt to twist the CPU off the sink first...just don't yank on it. If it is really cemented on there maybe a gentle prying/chisel action with a flat screwdriver will work better. Just try to hit the paste and not the CPU.

Yeah, seeing that it has been in there for 4 years and sounds like the paste is solidified, you will for sure need to clean off all of the old paste and apply the new. If you get airflow blockage your temps will go up and if your CPU isn't making a good contact with the sink your temps will go up too. Good luck!
February 3, 2008 10:18:45 PM

You aren't going to do any more damage than what you potentially just did by ripping it out of the socket.


Here is a good article to look into

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/274/4

When you reapply the thermal paste, put a small small amount on the CPU and work it in with a q-tip so that you get a nice thin film. This will make sure that you get the paste in all of the nooks and crannies of the surface. Do it with the heat sink too. Go back and put a small dab then put it all back together.
February 3, 2008 10:30:44 PM

thanks

well everything does seem in tact...no pin loses, no pin bents or anything which im greatful for.

I was thinkin about buying a new system...but then found a northwood 3GHz for a few bucks which i could potentially buy,then buy another CPU fan....cheaper and probably my only option right now.

Hmmm. no main computer...very lonely since I play my tv through it!
February 3, 2008 10:38:51 PM

Good, heres hoping that it all goes back to normal. Dude, sorry to hear that.
February 3, 2008 10:43:42 PM

thanks :)  Much appreciated for your help.

just...dont want to rip off the thing from the fan...confused on what to do. either a new system...or buy a cpu for a few bucks....
February 3, 2008 10:50:28 PM

What CPU fan should I get for the P4 socket 478? Id' rather use the one I am using now (Intel)..... but obviously cant because the CPU is stuck to it
February 3, 2008 10:51:58 PM

Come on..twist it off.. your already talkin about buyin a another CPU so whats the diff if you screw it up. GO FOR IT! It will probably POP right off!
February 3, 2008 11:51:17 PM

Is your fan still working? Why do you want a new one? Are you talking about a new heat sink and fan combo? Wait...are you giving up on your CPU?

It should come off with a little elbow grease. Use some rubbing alcohol or some nail polish remover to clean up the surfaces and you are ready to grease it back up.

I am confused if you are buying a new CPU because it is stuck on the sink or if you just wanted to get a new one.
February 3, 2008 11:55:27 PM

put the assembly in the freezer then, when frozen, the CPU should be easier to remove. Use a thin blade to separate them.
February 4, 2008 12:03:36 AM

pat said:
put the assembly in the freezer then, when frozen, the CPU should be easier to remove. Use a thin blade to separate them.



Nice, never hear\thought of the freezer.
February 4, 2008 5:16:51 AM

well yeh, the reason I'm thinking about buying another CPU (same model) is because it is stuck with the fan.... and don't want to ruin it :-/

I could put it in the freezer but worries the water, would ruin it when unfrozen.... ha! Sorry, just really careful. I don't want the CPU to snap off in half or something from the fan.

The fan works fine :) 
February 4, 2008 5:32:20 AM

water wont hurt it, just let it dry
February 4, 2008 6:19:19 AM

firehawk_1 said:
well yeh, the reason I'm thinking about buying another CPU (same model) is because it is stuck with the fan.... and don't want to ruin it :-/

I could put it in the freezer but worries the water, would ruin it when unfrozen.... ha! Sorry, just really careful. I don't want the CPU to snap off in half or something from the fan.

The fan works fine :) 

Put it in a plastic bag to keep condensation off. Works .
February 4, 2008 6:26:20 AM

It's funny... I don't remember if it was this forum or a different one, but I read about a guy that had the same thing happen with an old Athlon XP.

He put it in the toaster oven! He thought that would help it. And I guess it did, because he got it off. But it landed on the floor or something, and a few pins got bent. He got it working again though.

I just remember I couldn't believe that someone put their processor in a toaster oven. It was pretty funny...

But anyway, the water won't do anything, just make sure it's completely dry before using it. I remember reading about a guy that would clean his motherboards in the sink with a toothbrush....

And don't be afraid man. Come on. Why are you afraid of hurting it when you're going to buy a new one anyway if you can't get it off? It most likely won't get hurt anyway.

And your current heatsink is probably fine. After cleaning the dust, and putting thermal paste on it, I'm sure your temps will be much more reasonable.
February 4, 2008 6:33:54 AM

Thanks :) 

yeh.... well, see how it goes. I'd NEVER put any computer component in the freezer but well, worth a shot - so now the CPU and heatsink/FAN are in the freezer the past 10 minutes.....

Just wish I could get a hold of another CPU today rather than waiting for tomorrow if I place an order if this one doesn't work or something.

Whats the worst that could happen when you place back the CPU on the motherboard given the current situation? ....
February 4, 2008 6:52:44 AM

well ive bent some pins now :(  ****!

taken it out the freezer.... and its still hard as anything and in the process of trying to get it out using elbow grease....bent some pins and cant straighten them :( 
February 4, 2008 6:53:58 AM

You dont really want to know, but put it this way.
It involves lots of smoke, and we all know that those things run on smoke, so if you let it all out, you computer wont ever run again.

JK Most likely, if there is a problem, the computer wont start till you clear it.
Make sure you use new paste to put the thing back together.
Next time use a slight twist to break the bond between hsf and cpu. It may take a lot of slight twists to do the job, but it's still a lot easier than going through what you just have.
good luck.
February 4, 2008 8:07:21 PM

firehawk_1 said:
well ive bent some pins now :(  ****!

taken it out the freezer.... and its still hard as anything and in the process of trying to get it out using elbow grease....bent some pins and cant straighten them :( 



Sh!t dude, you were better off taking your chances of having case fire. Sorry for the bad luck.
February 4, 2008 8:32:20 PM

The best way to bend back pins in my experience is to have a small metal tube of some sort, which has a hole just big enough for a pin and is thin enough to fit between the individual pins.

As mentioned, many small twists will do it.

As I like to say, gently, but with force.
a b à CPUs
February 4, 2008 8:35:29 PM

SpinachEater said:
You aren't going to do any more damage than what you potentially just did by ripping it out of the socket.


Here is a good article to look into

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/274/4

When you reapply the thermal paste, put a small small amount on the CPU and work it in with a q-tip so that you get a nice thin film. This will make sure that you get the paste in all of the nooks and crannies of the surface. Do it with the heat sink too. Go back and put a small dab then put it all back together.

Never USE a Q-TIP for this kind of work. The cotton from it gets in with the CPU thermal pase esp. with some thing like AS5. You should use a plastic strip (ie. old credit card,etc) or your finger covered with some plastic bag.
February 6, 2008 1:37:36 PM

Woa there anal captain, that is just a taboo. I did it for mine and that didn't happen. It is working just dandy. I did inspect it for cotton deposits too because I was aware that it might happen. If you use a sloppy EZ-value q-tip and do it in the dark with a blindfold...yeah you might be asking for trouble, but it worked fine for me.
February 6, 2008 1:51:07 PM

Using a mechanical Pencil (0.5mm) will work by taking the lead out of it. I just tried it on my old P4 2.66ghz CPU, and it fit on the pin just fine. I was able to bend on pin, then bend it back. :lol: 

Edit:

Even worked (fit) on my old AMD Thunderbird pin.
a b à CPUs
February 6, 2008 7:52:08 PM

LOL

Straighten the pins as suggested, using a mechanical pencil with no lead.

Without a way to protect the pins, its going to be difficult to work on the heatsink-to-cpu connection. As you no doubt have discovered. :) 

You might try just laying the assembly on its side . . . put something under the cpu/heatsink joint to get those pins off the table and in the air, pointing horizontal to your table surface . . . and then try HEAT, SOLVENT, and a blade. Like a hairdryer, nailpolish remover, and a single edge razor blade.

A little heat . . . a little solvent on the seam . . . work the razor blade in between . . . IOW soften, disolve, and cut the glue seam between your heatsink and cpu. By working two, three, or worst case four sides slowly, you will eventually melt/dissolve/cut through the "glue" bond . . . and the cpu will drop a short distance to the cushion you have thoughtfully placed underneath it :) 

When considering a replacement, look at the Arctic 7 Freezer Pro. I did my first build in November, and have done four since then, and no heat sink will give a rookie a better result quicker and easier than this one.

Good luck!
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