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Options for HD DVD.

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Anonymous
June 18, 2005 10:59:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Dear members:

I am trying to create a project that involves the creation of a
high-definition lecture that I intend to deliver on DVD. However, I have
heard (not sure if the information is correct) that DVD technology does not
offer current support for high-definition. Is this true ?

What is the best choice for having a project deliver (hopefully on DVD
media) in HD quality ? In case DVDs do not support HD can the file be saved
as a QuickTime or MEPG file and then saved on a DVD treating the disk as a
data disk instead of a conventional DVD ?

In case the information is relevant I am currently running a PowerMac G5
under Mac OS X Tiger.

Thank you in advance for your help and suggestions.

Best regards,


--
Dr. Joseph Chamberlain, D.D.S.
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

More about : options dvd

Anonymous
June 18, 2005 3:46:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Joseph Chamberlain, DDS" <drjchamberlain@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:BED91473.DA3D%drjchamberlain@earthlink.net...
> Dear members:
>
> I am trying to create a project that involves the creation of a
> high-definition lecture that I intend to deliver on DVD. However, I have
> heard (not sure if the information is correct) that DVD technology does
> not
> offer current support for high-definition. Is this true ?
>
> What is the best choice for having a project deliver (hopefully on DVD
> media) in HD quality ? In case DVDs do not support HD can the file be
> saved
> as a QuickTime or MEPG file and then saved on a DVD treating the disk as a
> data disk instead of a conventional DVD ?
>
> In case the information is relevant I am currently running a PowerMac G5
> under Mac OS X Tiger.
>
> Thank you in advance for your help and suggestions.
>
> Best regards,
>
>
> --
> Dr. Joseph Chamberlain, D.D.S.
> Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery


I think at this point the most compatible format for HD distribution is
probably WMHD. The viewers will need to have a "newer" computer running
Windows to play them back or a Windows Media Center PC connected to their
television. You might want to limit the res to 720P to allow slightly slower
computer to crunch it without stuttering. That certainly does not help you
much on the Mac side of things at this point.

Honestly I think a well mastered SD video presentation would be much easier
for you in the long run being far more compatible with the millions of
existing DVD players and computers regardless of OS and muscle.

Charles Tomaras
Seattle, WA
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 1:42:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Speaking of WMHD...are there any compatible DVD players on the market yet?

"Charles Tomaras" <tomaras@tomaras.com> wrote in message
news:iOWdnYxFeKmW8SnfRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
>
> "Joseph Chamberlain, DDS" <drjchamberlain@earthlink.net> wrote in message
> news:BED91473.DA3D%drjchamberlain@earthlink.net...
>> Dear members:
>>
>> I am trying to create a project that involves the creation of a
>> high-definition lecture that I intend to deliver on DVD. However, I have
>> heard (not sure if the information is correct) that DVD technology does
>> not
>> offer current support for high-definition. Is this true ?
>>
>> What is the best choice for having a project deliver (hopefully on DVD
>> media) in HD quality ? In case DVDs do not support HD can the file be
>> saved
>> as a QuickTime or MEPG file and then saved on a DVD treating the disk as
>> a
>> data disk instead of a conventional DVD ?
>>
>> In case the information is relevant I am currently running a PowerMac G5
>> under Mac OS X Tiger.
>>
>> Thank you in advance for your help and suggestions.
>>
>> Best regards,
>>
>>
>> --
>> Dr. Joseph Chamberlain, D.D.S.
>> Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
>
>
> I think at this point the most compatible format for HD distribution is
> probably WMHD. The viewers will need to have a "newer" computer running
> Windows to play them back or a Windows Media Center PC connected to their
> television. You might want to limit the res to 720P to allow slightly
> slower computer to crunch it without stuttering. That certainly does not
> help you much on the Mac side of things at this point.
>
> Honestly I think a well mastered SD video presentation would be much
> easier for you in the long run being far more compatible with the millions
> of existing DVD players and computers regardless of OS and muscle.
>
> Charles Tomaras
> Seattle, WA
>
Related resources
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 1:42:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Son of man" <sonofman1@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:E6edneWC3Ls2UCnfRVn-qA@comcast.com...
> Speaking of WMHD...are there any compatible DVD players on the market yet?

I'm not aware of any yet but I will do some more checking. For what it's
worth here is a link to a guide for authoring WM HD DVD's if the original
poster is interested:

http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windowsmedia/content_p...



>
> "Charles Tomaras" <tomaras@tomaras.com> wrote in message
> news:iOWdnYxFeKmW8SnfRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
>>
>> "Joseph Chamberlain, DDS" <drjchamberlain@earthlink.net> wrote in message
>> news:BED91473.DA3D%drjchamberlain@earthlink.net...
>>> Dear members:
>>>
>>> I am trying to create a project that involves the creation of a
>>> high-definition lecture that I intend to deliver on DVD. However, I have
>>> heard (not sure if the information is correct) that DVD technology does
>>> not
>>> offer current support for high-definition. Is this true ?
>>>
>>> What is the best choice for having a project deliver (hopefully on DVD
>>> media) in HD quality ? In case DVDs do not support HD can the file be
>>> saved
>>> as a QuickTime or MEPG file and then saved on a DVD treating the disk as
>>> a
>>> data disk instead of a conventional DVD ?
>>>
>>> In case the information is relevant I am currently running a PowerMac G5
>>> under Mac OS X Tiger.
>>>
>>> Thank you in advance for your help and suggestions.
>>>
>>> Best regards,
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Dr. Joseph Chamberlain, D.D.S.
>>> Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
>>
>>
>> I think at this point the most compatible format for HD distribution is
>> probably WMHD. The viewers will need to have a "newer" computer running
>> Windows to play them back or a Windows Media Center PC connected to their
>> television. You might want to limit the res to 720P to allow slightly
>> slower computer to crunch it without stuttering. That certainly does not
>> help you much on the Mac side of things at this point.
>>
>> Honestly I think a well mastered SD video presentation would be much
>> easier for you in the long run being far more compatible with the
>> millions of existing DVD players and computers regardless of OS and
>> muscle.
>>
>> Charles Tomaras
>> Seattle, WA
>>
>
>
June 19, 2005 6:29:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Joseph Chamberlain, DDS" wrote:

> Dear members:
>
> I am trying to create a project that involves the creation of a
> high-definition lecture that I intend to deliver on DVD. However, I have
> heard (not sure if the information is correct) that DVD technology does not
> offer current support for high-definition. Is this true ?
>
> What is the best choice for having a project deliver (hopefully on DVD
> media) in HD quality ? In case DVDs do not support HD can the file be saved
> as a QuickTime or MEPG file and then saved on a DVD treating the disk as a
> data disk instead of a conventional DVD ?
>
> In case the information is relevant I am currently running a PowerMac G5
> under Mac OS X Tiger.
>
> Thank you in advance for your help and suggestions.
>

You don't mention how the source will be generated. Will it be from studio
quality Hi Def cameras, computer graphics, or professionally shot 35 mm film
converted to Hi Def format?
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 7:21:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Iam going to hook my HD tv up to my Tv and get HD that way. their a
are NO Hd Bluray or any HD movies as yet for sale not even players i
dont think.

Iam just going to wait for people to beat the capoy protection and
start ripping the movies and stuff and encoding them to Divx 6 and WMV
HD and posing them on p2p networks.

Then all i have to do is download themand play them via my pc to my TV
to get HD Movies. When they do start relasing HD movies they willbe
Very expensive and plus the player would be VERY VERY expensive.

Iam going to connect my PC to my HD Tv up via componet. DVI or HDMI
would be better but you can still get HD via compent just fine.

/ps Iam using a PC but all i have siad can be ralted to you. With
maybe a few tweaks.


On Sat, 18 Jun 2005 06:59:48 GMT, "Joseph Chamberlain, DDS"
<drjchamberlain@earthlink.net> wrote:

>Dear members:
>
>I am trying to create a project that involves the creation of a
>high-definition lecture that I intend to deliver on DVD. However, I have
>heard (not sure if the information is correct) that DVD technology does not
>offer current support for high-definition. Is this true ?
>
>What is the best choice for having a project deliver (hopefully on DVD
>media) in HD quality ? In case DVDs do not support HD can the file be saved
>as a QuickTime or MEPG file and then saved on a DVD treating the disk as a
>data disk instead of a conventional DVD ?
>
>In case the information is relevant I am currently running a PowerMac G5
>under Mac OS X Tiger.
>
>Thank you in advance for your help and suggestions.
>
>Best regards,
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 11:32:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Son of man" <sonofman1@comcast.net> wrote

>> Speaking of WMHD...are there any compatible DVD players on the market yet?

I believe there's at least two out of Japan that will do WMV-HD. It
could be DivX HD that they do. Can't remember. Besides that, there are
certainly several on the drawing boards, if they're not actually being
produced already.
June 19, 2005 7:25:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <BED91473.DA3D%drjchamberlain@earthlink.net>,
"Joseph Chamberlain, DDS" <drjchamberlain@earthlink.net> wrote:

> Dear members:
>
> I am trying to create a project that involves the creation of a
> high-definition lecture that I intend to deliver on DVD. However, I have
> heard (not sure if the information is correct) that DVD technology does not
> offer current support for high-definition. Is this true ?
>
> What is the best choice for having a project deliver (hopefully on DVD
> media) in HD quality ? In case DVDs do not support HD can the file be saved
> as a QuickTime or MEPG file and then saved on a DVD treating the disk as a
> data disk instead of a conventional DVD ?
>
> In case the information is relevant I am currently running a PowerMac G5
> under Mac OS X Tiger.
>
> Thank you in advance for your help and suggestions.
>
> Best regards,

I heard that DVD Studio Pro for the Mac now has ability to master HD-DVD
projects. But Apple has recently announced support for Blu-Ray.

So probably towards the end of 2006, computer vendors will actually ship
some Blu-Ray drives, along with software to support it.

To play back HD content without hardware acceleration is too painful.
Apple has posted some movie trailers in 720p and 1080p. The latter are
eating up all the CPU on top PC systems and require a minimum G5 on the
Mac side.

So the infrastructure for playback will have to wait for set tops but
those will be expensive at first. PS3 is suppose to play back Blu-Ray
however and should be under $500. But it might not be out until towards
the end of 2006.
Anonymous
June 27, 2005 7:52:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On 6/19/05 2:29 AM, in article 42B53B0C.EF2B12D0@Backhome.org,
"Tim@Backhome.org" <Tim@Backhome.org> wrote:

>
>
> "Joseph Chamberlain, DDS" wrote:
>
>> Dear members:
>>
>> I am trying to create a project that involves the creation of a
>> high-definition lecture that I intend to deliver on DVD. However, I have
>> heard (not sure if the information is correct) that DVD technology does not
>> offer current support for high-definition. Is this true ?
>>
>> What is the best choice for having a project deliver (hopefully on DVD
>> media) in HD quality ? In case DVDs do not support HD can the file be saved
>> as a QuickTime or MEPG file and then saved on a DVD treating the disk as a
>> data disk instead of a conventional DVD ?
>>
>> In case the information is relevant I am currently running a PowerMac G5
>> under Mac OS X Tiger.
>>
>> Thank you in advance for your help and suggestions.
>>
>
> You don't mention how the source will be generated. Will it be from studio
> quality Hi Def cameras, computer graphics, or professionally shot 35 mm film
> converted to Hi Def format?
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks to all for replying to my original post. After reading your answers
and suggestions I kept wondering how simple this process could be (recording
improved resolution or HD footage on a "universal" medium such as DVDs).

The need to have the lecture recorded as HD instead of standard video
definition comes from the desire to deliver improved detail as it certainly
benefits the learning process for those watching. Considering the videos
will deal with nuances of facial anatomy, skin and dental textures, subtle
color and tone differences and other characteristics that are normally
examined under proper medical lighting and magnification (medical loupes),
it would be beneficial to have this lecture displayed on HD format instead
to try to approach the real feeling of being present during the examination.

It is my understanding that Apple's new Codec has been incorporated into
Quick-Time 7 and it can be downloaded for free for both Macintosh and
Windows for free (only the Pro version of Quick-Time needs to be purchased).
It is also my understanding that Quick-Time does support HD. This should in
theory allow anyone to download the latest version of Quick-Time and watch a
QT data file burned on a DVD in HD definition. Is this assumption correct ?

The cameras I plan to use are either Sony's "prosumer" model HDR-FX1 HDV
Handycam or the soon-to-be-released "consumer" model HDR-HC1 1080i Handycam.

Since the files could be created as Quick-Time files and compressed using
Apple's latest Codec H.264 I assume data transfer rates will not be an issue
as has been discussed here when feeding raw footage in HD format. Is this a
correct and fair assumption ?

What are your opinions about the approach described above ? Would you
suggest a simpler technique to achieve the same objective ?

Thank you in advance for your help and feedback.

Best regards,


--
Dr. Joseph Chamberlain, D.D.S.
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
!