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PC is going to be operating in 100 degree temp room

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January 29, 2008 5:24:07 PM


What kind of additional cooling should a PC have if its going to be operating in a room that sometimes exceeds 100 degrees or more? I'm building a new pc for a restaurant and it will be placed in the kitchen. The kitchen sometimes exceeds 100 degrees. Not to mention all the flour and other junk that will be clogging the fans.

Anybody have suggestions for a cooling setup? Is a hard drive cooler necessary?

Thanks

January 29, 2008 5:49:33 PM

You need one of these...LOL
http://dustfreepcinfo.com/?gclid=CO_aga6anJECFQ6iiQodjE...
-For real though… place it in a spot that is relatively safe and enclose it. Just leave some room for air to get in.

** Assuming you mean 37 Celsius.. You won’t have a heat issue if you run a simple work PC.
If you are slapping a quad core in there OC'd and a 8800GTX you gunna need some Water cooling.
Anonymous
January 29, 2008 5:51:03 PM

http://www.swiftnets.com/

you can pick your parts from there and then shop around on the net for best pricing.
Related resources
January 29, 2008 5:58:41 PM

By 100 degrees I figure its safe to assume that's 100C.

Edit: Apparently no one found the above line funny but me. 100F ~ 38C for the record. That was a prod directed towards the reluctant to switch from fahrenheit but I digress...

Harddrives are usually rated for 60C.
CPUs are usually rated for 65-75C.

These are their operating temperatures, sometimes referred to their environmental operating temperatures but that's almost a misnomer as they intend to mean the temperature of the device itself when operating in that environment, not the temperature of the enviroment around the device.

Harddrive wise, go single platter only, I'ld suggest a Spinpoint F1 if you need the storage, otherwise you can find something significantly cheaper in the smaller ranges. If harddrive access is considerable then yes, you will need to invest in a cooler, most likely active (fans).

CPU wise you're probably best going for an E1200/2140/4300/6300. Anything beyond that will probably be a nightmare for cooling.

For the most part the motherboard(integrated video?)/power supply/etc should be fine with those temperatures.

I would suggest either getting a chasis with replaceable or washable intake filters as well. Exhaust filters are usually more of a hinderance than anything.

I'm guessing this PC somehow integrates in their POS system? If the storage requirements are meager ie if its a client/server system you can pickup the smaller transcend SSDs in the 4GB or less rage for quite cheap, the caveat is they are in the 44pin ide notebook factor and you will need an adaptor, and of course a motherboard to boot off of IDE instead of SATA.

Good luck.
January 29, 2008 6:02:04 PM

praeses said:
By 100 degrees I figure its safe to assume that's 100C.


I would think people in a kitchen would not work in 100 C
lol...Talk about labor issues
January 29, 2008 6:05:52 PM

Generally speaking your machine will run 15C hotter then room temp. so if you are 37C, count on this machine idle @ 52C, well within limits as long as you don’t push that machine.


***edited spelling
January 29, 2008 6:24:22 PM

Praeses, do you understand what 100 Celcius is? That's when water boils. No human would be able to be in that kind of environment operating a PC.
January 29, 2008 6:29:29 PM

I guess one of the main questions determining the parts is what is it going to be used for? Browsing online/ running some type of recipe/payroll software? I'll assume not playing games...
January 29, 2008 6:32:59 PM

nickr336 said:
Praeses, do you understand what 100 Celcius is? That's when water boils. No human would be able to be in that kind of environment operating a PC.


Unless they put it in the oven with the breadsticks;)
January 29, 2008 7:06:00 PM

Water only boils at 100c at sealevel. Maybe he means 100c 5000m under sealevel?
January 29, 2008 7:23:47 PM

nickr336 said:
Praeses, do you understand what 100 Celcius is? That's when water boils. No human would be able to be in that kind of environment operating a PC.

You've never been in a finnish sauna? :pt1cable: 
100C is maybe a bit too warm, but something like 80-90C works great for me. :p  :bounce: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sauna
http://www.sauna.fi/englanti/englanti.html

The pc wouldn't handle it but the operator would be just fine, a bit sweaty though
January 29, 2008 8:00:02 PM

Wolfdale + SSD Hard Drive + Watercooling.

oh yes.
January 29, 2008 8:29:44 PM

nickr336 said:
Praeses, do you understand what 100 Celcius is? That's when water boils. No human would be able to be in that kind of environment operating a PC.


Exactly, my assumption was safe.
January 29, 2008 8:50:11 PM

Good luck dude. Make sure you drink a lot of water to keep your self hydrated. Your best bet is a TEC cooling set up. 100C is the temp in which water boils! 100F is 37.7C, then normal water cooling will work. Yes I know that you are talking about 100F, but thats still pretty hot. My basement is at 68-75F during summer and lower in the winter.
January 29, 2008 8:58:12 PM

praeses said:
Exactly, my assumption was safe.


Um... I'm not even going to touch that.
January 29, 2008 9:13:55 PM

praeses said:
Exactly, my assumption was safe.


praeses, did you fail science class?

Your assumption was flat out dumb. Working in a room at 100 C would kill a person. Let alone anything in the kitchen with water would boil away. So unless the whole kitchen is a giant oven go back and pass elementary level science.
January 29, 2008 9:39:31 PM

i think im just more shocked that people thought of 100C and not 100F.

I understand the US is one of the only countrys that have to be different in there temps and standard Vs. Metric.

BUT COME ON PEOPLE Ha Ha


January 29, 2008 9:51:53 PM

Back on topic people. Robrich, I would suggest that you definitely get filters over all of the fans on that computer. The grease and flour in the air will kill it faster than you would believe. As long as it won't be used for gaming or something of that sort a E2140 would be a really good choice because it wouldn't need a very high flow ventilation setup, which would cut down on clogged filters. You could even use a passive cooling setup with no fans and a large CPU heatsink, which would mean you wouldn't have to worry about making sure that the filters get cleaned.
January 29, 2008 9:59:04 PM

I have worked in a kitchen befor, why dose the tower have to be there? we had ours in the Office with cables ran to monitors over each station.

Can it be stored in another room while you run a cable to the monitor? I dont know if cooks on the line need to type while cooking. I think it would save a few dallors in cooling issues this way

At that temp IMPO, i would go watercooled. This way you wouldnt have to worrie so much on checking fans over the CPU. just the one on the cooling unit
January 29, 2008 10:06:38 PM

Dan_P said:
i think im just more shocked that people thought of 100C and not 100F.

I understand the US is one of the only countrys that have to be different in there temps and standard Vs. Metric.

BUT COME ON PEOPLE Ha Ha




Not true. We are so over taught Fahrenheit, that any unlabeled temperature is perceived to be in Fahrenheit. Now, as smart as we Americans actually are, we realize that the rest of the world uses celsius, so we automatically assume that any unmarked temperature is in celsius, also assuming that the poster is not from America.

However, when I looked at the temperature, I assumed he meant Kelvin, as it requires no temperature denomination. -280degrees F might allow for some sweet overclocking, though I probably couldn't resist licking the CPU,only to find my tongue stuck to it, which realllllly is a bad position to find yourself in when you are the only IT person in the Arctic Research facility (aka IARC www.iarc.uaf.edu/).

January 29, 2008 10:06:41 PM

grieve said:
Generally speaking your machine will run 15C hotter then room temp. so if you are 37C, count on this machine idle @ 52C, well within limits as long as you don’t push that machine.


***edited spelling

LOL
January 30, 2008 2:01:32 AM

wow. people are way over-thinking this one. no environment where a human works NORMALLY will get to 100C. are there any budgetary constrains? what is the primary purpose of the machine? you can get an IDE <-> CF adapter with a 4GB media on it, and use a Celeron 440 (conroe-L 35w) or an Athlon 64 LE-1600 (45W) with a BIG heatsink like a Coolermaster Hyper 212 with the fan remove. Just eliminate as many moving parts as possible and only use fans as a means to exhausting the hot air. It's possible to optimize an XP intstall to fit on that CF card with the page file, and so long as nothing is saved to it, it should be VERY reliable, even in that sort of environment. load it up with a gig+ of samsung or micron ram (try and find some ECC ram and mount heat spreaders to it for ultimate stability, and use only one stick)

this wont be a speed demon, but after it boots, it should be more than adequate for inventory or ordering supplies. Get a High-speed Patriot or Kingston CF card @ 8Gigs if there needs to be some applications installed outside of the OS :) 
January 30, 2008 2:37:22 AM

THOUGHT I'D PUT MY POST IN CAPS AND BOLD CAUSE THE POST GOT OFF TOPIC...

ANYHOW, ANOTHER SUGGESTION IS TO BUY EXPENSIVE, LARGE PASSIVE COOLING HEATSINKS FOR THE CPU AND/OR HARDDRIVES. DEPENDING ON THE CHIPSET, I WOULD MOUNT LARGER HEATSINKS ON THE MOTHERBOARD AND USE AN ONBOARD GPU.

A "PASSIVE" SETUP WITH HEATSINKS WILL REQUIRE LESS FANS, AND THUS LESS AIRFLOW TO SUCK UP FLOUR AND STUFF....

HOWEVER, TEMP MONITORING WOULD BE A MUST AS TOO FEW FANS WILL CAUSE OVERHEATING.
January 30, 2008 2:39:07 AM

100C=212F at sea level
January 30, 2008 2:56:09 AM

If you are speaking of Fahrenheit which I'll just assume you are, air cooling with artic silver 5 and a well ventilated case should be good enough. I operate my PC sometimes in 80 Fahrenheit or more room temperature, it depends on the weather, I only have air cooling and I have overclocked as well.
January 30, 2008 12:54:21 PM

Maybe he means 10c and put an extra zero in? I'm sure that is it.
January 30, 2008 1:28:00 PM

The biggest problem is going to be the combination of dust (flour) and moisture/grease, the machine will require regular (probably daily) cleaning; a case with removeable (and spare) air filters is a must.

Have you considered the "Public Health" side? Having a PC, keyboard and monitor in a kitchen area would be a major breeding ground for all kinds of nasties (Specialy the keyboard).
January 30, 2008 2:03:28 PM

watercooling and air cooling aren't going to be that helpful.

they will only be able to bring the machine to around ambient temperature, and not any lower.

What about getting a thin client or a dumb terminal and have the real server/workstation somewhere else?
January 30, 2008 2:31:54 PM

Or build a column and put the computer(s) in it, and give it its own air duct.
January 30, 2008 3:15:56 PM

praeses said:
By 100 degrees I figure its safe to assume that's 100C.

Harddrives are usually rated for 60C.
CPUs are usually rated for 65-75C.

These are their operating temperatures, sometimes referred to their environmental operating temperatures but that's almost a misnomer as they intend to mean the temperature of the device itself when operating in that environment, not the temperature of the enviroment around the device.

Harddrive wise, go single platter only, I'ld suggest a Spinpoint F1 if you need the storage, otherwise you can find something significantly cheaper in the smaller ranges. If harddrive access is considerable then yes, you will need to invest in a cooler, most likely active (fans).

CPU wise you're probably best going for an E1200/2140/4300/6300. Anything beyond that will probably be a nightmare for cooling.

For the most part the motherboard(integrated video?)/power supply/etc should be fine with those temperatures.

I would suggest either getting a chasis with replaceable or washable intake filters as well. Exhaust filters are usually more of a hinderance than anything.

I'm guessing this PC somehow integrates in their POS system? If the storage requirements are meager ie if its a client/server system you can pickup the smaller transcend SSDs in the 4GB or less rage for quite cheap, the caveat is they are in the 44pin ide notebook factor and you will need an adaptor, and of course a motherboard to boot off of IDE instead of SATA.

Good luck.




ROFL!!!! :lol:  :lol:  :pt1cable: 


Some people need to learn to think before they post...
January 30, 2008 3:38:03 PM

No, no, people, you have it all wrong!!! By 100 degrees, he means 100 Kelvin, which translates into -173 degrees celsius or -279 degrees fahrenheit. I would suggest to the OP that he makes sure to bundle his computer up in a nice comforter in order to make sure the cpu doesn't throttle up in an attempt to avoid damage. This technology, known as 'thermal throttling' is used in order to protect the CPU, such as in this extreme case where the CPU may get frostbite, which can/may develop into gangrene.

I thought before I posted, but I just think in the wrong direction. :D 
January 30, 2008 3:44:56 PM

LOL :bounce: 

How could you use WaterCooling in a room at 100C when the water would boil inside the computer! :pt1cable: 

To OP, could you have the computer in another room but very close? You could have the monitor with you with very long cable (through the wall?), a wireless Keyboard/Mouse?
January 30, 2008 6:13:57 PM

Water cooling doesn't require water. Sand perhaps, is a better replacement.....

Yes...

Sand.

It doesn't matter, like I said much earlier, he means 100 K
January 30, 2008 6:28:53 PM

CompTIA_Rep said:
Water cooling doesn't require water. Sand perhaps, is a better replacement.....

Yes...

Sand.

It doesn't matter, like I said much earlier, he means 100 K


huh? -173C?

I've worked as a kitchen bit.. uhh. whatever, and i'm pretty sure the OP means 100F (37.7C).

January 30, 2008 6:31:57 PM

No. Kelvin. Just accept it. The freezing cold makes the food taste better. :D 
January 30, 2008 7:09:09 PM

LOL this post got out of control.

robrich22 you’ll want to place the machine elsewhere and run a monitor/keyboard to the desired room... I think even more then heat you need to worry about grease, if that crap gets inside the rig, its hooped.

*** I would suggest buying a pencil and paper for the boys in the kitchen and spend the left over cash on air conditioning!
.
January 30, 2008 7:49:39 PM

Stemnin, you got your program wrong. you must convert 100 k into distance before you can convert it into Fahrenheit. It should come out to 78F.
January 30, 2008 8:06:16 PM

Quote:
Here ways to protect your from dust or powder.
http://dirtbag.biz/
http://www.clean-aire.com/


OMG LOL

Look at the 'with' and 'without' pics on the bottom right.
http://dirtbag.biz/

Never ever have I seen that much dust... I have seen some nasty stuff too.
Also I don’t think having the PC in a bag is going to help for his main issue, heat.

January 31, 2008 4:14:17 AM

Zalman used to make a pasively cooled case (no fans), the whole case was a big heatsink with heat pipes to fit a number of MoBo's; don't know if they still make it, it would get round the dust/steam/grease problem.

The other alternative is an industrial ITX PC (depending on the processing power needed).
January 31, 2008 5:35:47 AM

robrich22 said:
What kind of additional cooling should a PC have if its going to be operating in a room that sometimes exceeds 100 degrees or more? I'm building a new pc for a restaurant and it will be placed in the kitchen. The kitchen sometimes exceeds 100 degrees. Not to mention all the flour and other junk that will be clogging the fans.

Anybody have suggestions for a cooling setup? Is a hard drive cooler necessary?

Thanks


How about a Panasonic Toughbook 30?
January 31, 2008 8:20:43 AM

Check www.ibt.ca and never look back, I have the IBT268 and it is great.
!