Wall monutef TV help needed

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I am planning to buy a HDTV for the family room. I think I am going for a
42" or 50" flat to be installed on the wall. I am not technical so I am all
confused about different TVs. How do I educate myself just enough to select
one? What should I look when I am buying one?

I am going to use it watch cable TV, DVD, VCR. I also have a Telestar 5
sattelite. I like to be able to connect my laptop to watch our digital
photos.

I also want to know how high a TV can be installed. I like to install it
above fireplace. The fireplace is not used.

There are 3 plasma 42" listed on Sams Club site. a CDS for $1500, a Samsung
for $1800, and a Dell for $2800. Why such a big range? Is any of them good?

Thanks
14 answers Last reply
More about wall monutef needed
  1. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    "Ed" <Please@DontEmail.me> wrote in message
    news:c9aa4$42bcbc46$18d68135$30855@KNOLOGY.NET...
    > I am planning to buy a HDTV for the family room. I think I am going for a
    > 42" or 50" flat to be installed on the wall. I am not technical so I am
    all
    > confused about different TVs. How do I educate myself just enough to
    select
    > one? What should I look when I am buying one?
    >
    > I am going to use it watch cable TV, DVD, VCR. I also have a Telestar 5
    > sattelite. I like to be able to connect my laptop to watch our digital
    > photos.
    >
    > I also want to know how high a TV can be installed. I like to install it
    > above fireplace. The fireplace is not used.

    You've got a problem. The center of the (visible display) portion of the
    monitor should be no higher than eye level from your planned viewing area,
    when you are sitting down. Put it above the fireplace, and you'll be
    straining your neck to see a poor quality image (looking up is not a good
    viewing angle for any monitor). That is, unless you intend to raise your
    couch up about five feet off the floor. :)

    This specific problem is the reason that when I was house shopping I
    insisted that (among other things) the house I bought would NOT have a
    fireplace. It serves no useful purpose unless you really LOVE fireplaces
    (some people do). Other than that, a fireplace is just a major pain in the
    ASS when you are trying to organize a room. That goes double if you are
    trying to set up a home theater of some kind in the same room.

    If the fireplace is not used, consider removing it. Have a contractor wall
    in that area, as where the fireplace is, is exactly where your monitor
    should be. I say that as you were planning to put the monitor ABOVE The
    fireplace. That tells me that the wall where the fireplace is would be a
    good location for a monitor, if it was installed somewhere in front of where
    the fireplace currently is. -Dave
  2. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    In article <42bdc27f$1$62508$892e7fe2@authen.white.readfreenews.net> "Dave
    C." <noway@nohow.not> writes:


    >You've got a problem. The center of the (visible display) portion of the
    >monitor should be no higher than eye level from your planned viewing area,
    >when you are sitting down. Put it above the fireplace, and you'll be
    >straining your neck to see a poor quality image (looking up is not a good
    >viewing angle for any monitor). That is, unless you intend to raise your
    >couch up about five feet off the floor. :)
    >
    >This specific problem is the reason that when I was house shopping I
    >insisted that (among other things) the house I bought would NOT have a
    >fireplace. It serves no useful purpose unless you really LOVE fireplaces
    >(some people do). Other than that, a fireplace is just a major pain in the
    >ASS when you are trying to organize a room. That goes double if you are
    >trying to set up a home theater of some kind in the same room.
    >
    >If the fireplace is not used, consider removing it. Have a contractor wall
    >in that area, as where the fireplace is, is exactly where your monitor
    >should be. I say that as you were planning to put the monitor ABOVE The
    >fireplace. That tells me that the wall where the fireplace is would be a
    >good location for a monitor, if it was installed somewhere in front of where
    >the fireplace currently is. -Dave
    >

    All this is correct. However, one option available is for the user to
    adjust the tilt angle of the mount such that when seated at the normal
    viewing location the face of the display screen is straight-on and
    perfectly perpendicular to the viewer(s). Depending on viewing distance
    and installed height of the screen this could require as much as
    30-degrees of down-tilt for a small room, say something 8 x 10 and an
    installed height of approximately 6' and a seated (viewing) height of
    approx 3'. I mention that because although most wall-mount kits allow for
    minor tilt adjustments, none that I'm aware of can provide 30 degrees
    without modification of the bracket or shimming the mounting surface.

    I can understand the need or desire to place it high enough as to be "out
    of reach" of toddlers who can easily destroy the face of the screen with
    one of their toys.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    >
    > I can understand the need or desire to place it high enough as to be "out
    > of reach" of toddlers who can easily destroy the face of the screen with
    > one of their toys.

    Well, the proper solution to that is to remove the toddlers from the home.
    (JUST KIDDING!!!) Actually, your idea to tilt the monitor down would
    probably work OK. Especially if you always sat in a reclined position while
    watching TV. If it was my home, I'd just remove the fireplace and put a
    heavy CRT monitor where it used to be. Then you wouldn't have to worry
    about the toddlers too much. That is, unless you want to strap the TV to
    the wall to prevent a toddler from tipping it over. (not a bad idea) -Dave
  4. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    In article <42bdce91$0$62503$892e7fe2@authen.white.readfreenews.net> "Dave
    C." <noway@nohow.not> writes:

    >Well, the proper solution to that is to remove the toddlers from the home.
    >(JUST KIDDING!!!) Actually, your idea to tilt the monitor down would
    >probably work OK. Especially if you always sat in a reclined position while
    >watching TV. If it was my home, I'd just remove the fireplace and put a
    >heavy CRT monitor where it used to be. Then you wouldn't have to worry
    >about the toddlers too much. That is, unless you want to strap the TV to
    >the wall to prevent a toddler from tipping it over. (not a bad idea) -Dave

    We actually came up with a slightly different solution to the toddler
    problem and one which is extremely effective and failsafe. I promise you
    by all things holy, the toddler absolutely **WILL NOT** touch that screen.

    Given that virtually all toddlers bounce around the house either
    barefooted or in sock feet or crawling on all fours, you can (and we did)
    place a 24" deep by 7' wide strip of **DEEP PILE** plastic carpet runner
    in front of the new entertainment center with the CLEATS FACING UP!!

    I personally guaran-Goddamn-tee that will immediately halt any toddler as
    well as all cats and dogs in their tracks! More importantly the child will
    immediately learn, all by itself and without any further need of
    corrective instruction that the area in front of the TV is OFF LIMITS,
    without their parents (who don't believe in capital punishment) having to
    ever once correct them or repeatedly holler at them while sitting there
    watching the child completely ignore them as it destroys the screen of a
    $3000 television.

    Don't misunderstand. We love children. I just have little tolerance for
    parents who allow their children to be out of control or completely ignore
    them while they are allowed to run at large, wreaking havoc in their wake.
    We are firm believers that there is nothing nicer than a well-trained dog
    and nothing worse than a rude, ill-mannered child.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    "nonone" <noone@nowhere.com> wrote in message
    news:lGeve.1024551$w62.11337@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > My hubby wanted to get a "big TV", so I did some research. I wanted a TV
    > that could truly handle high definition and be usable ten years from now
    > when HDTV will be the norm rather than the exception.

    I stopped right there. Nothing you buy now will be acceptable ten years from
    now. Think how computers were ten years ago, and at that time, those of us
    that started in 1980 felt that 1995 computers were pretty darn good
    (remember 8.3 file names????!). Technology changes too fast, gets too much
    better, and gets too much less expensive. Don't you agree?
  6. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    "Mr Fixit" <MrFixit@msn.com> wrote in message
    news:54brb11n5aivq4gt91iq942b21im4cjepf@4ax.com...
    > The bottom line is stay with recommended major brands and purchase
    > whatever looks good _to you_ while staying within your price range from
    > among those recommended brands. Set the max price you can afford -before-
    > going in to shop and stick to your budget.
    >
    > The only difference between EDTV and HDTV is the difference you can see
    > and appreciate. If you can't readily see that difference, or the
    > difference seems only minimal, then the extra money spent for the HD model
    > is money wasted (except for bragging rights).
    >
    > Most wall-mountable Plasma screens are EDTV and the few that are true HDTV
    > are doggoned expensive, so make sure the viewable performance difference
    > really is worth the price difference to you. That price difference is
    > likely to be substantial, so be sure this is a 9/9 decision that both you
    > and your hubby are comfortable with. Prices are also dropping and the
    > technology improving. I know you're looking for a "10-yr TV" but honestly
    > I/m not sure that animal exists right now. At the current rate of
    > technical advancement in widescreen televisions, the set you purchase
    > today could be "yesterday's news" by next year and close to being obsolete
    > in 6 or 7 years.
    >

    Most standard tv channels are broadcast at 480i whihc is roughly equivalent
    to EDTV (480p), while HDTV is broadcast at 720p or 1080i. Here is my logic
    as to why HDTV is better than EDTV. On my 42" TV, there is a huge
    difference between normal TV channels (EDTV at 480i) and HDTV channels (720p
    and 1080i). On the Discovery HD channel, the difference is like wearing
    glasses and not wearing glasses, like the difference between having black
    and white TV and having color TV. Granted, you need to have a larger TV to
    see the difference, but it is a big difference.

    But to be fair to the EDTV folks....
    If you look at the CNET ratings, the 42" lower resolution Panasonic EDTV
    received top ratings although they do point out that it does have lower
    resolution. The top rated Panasonic 42" EDTV is $2k at either samsclub or
    costco and teh HDTV pioneer 42" is $3k, so there is a price difference, but
    the price difference isn't huge. But then if you go to the Cnet ratings the
    Panasonic 42" EDTV did quite well beating out other displays wiht higher
    resolutions. I chose not to buy the Panasonic 42" EDTV; instead I opted for
    the higher resolution display, and I am glad I did.

    http://reviews.cnet.com/Home_video/4521-6531_7-5021476-3.html?tag=prmo1

    > The only difference between EDTV and HDTV is the difference you can see
    > and appreciate. If you can't readily see that difference, or the
    > difference seems only minimal, then the extra money spent for the HD model
    > is money wasted (except for bragging rights).

    Most stores do not have a high def. signal for their TVs, so you can't see
    the difference in the stores. It is utterly stupid. How are they supposed
    to sell high def TVs, if they don't show people the difference between high
    def. and not high def? I went to Costco and looked at my TV on display
    showing a horrible standard TV picture off of standard TV. The picture
    looked lousy, nothing at all like when I see Discovery HD at home on the
    same model. You really won't see the high def. difference until you get the
    TV home and hook it up to a good high def. channel that happens to be
    broadcasting high def. signals filmed with a high def. camera (like
    Discovery HD). If you don't see a difference between normal TV channels and
    high def. channels, you don't have a high def. TV. (assuming the picture is
    filmed and broadcast in high def.) So that leaves us using reviews or word
    of mouth to decide which TV is best.

    At the higher end Best Buy store they only had one TV hooked up to a high
    def. satellite signal (and you will only see high def. if is on a high def.
    channel filmed with a high def. camera); all the rest of the high def. TVs
    were mass fed a standard 480i DVD signal. I know all of this now, I did not
    know it before I bought my TV.

    But Mr. Fixit is right in that you have to choose how much you are going to
    pay, and there will be something better and cheaper next month.

    noone
  7. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    "Z Man" <z1z@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:Yulve.10458$ik5.8715@fe12.lga...
    >
    > "nonone" <noone@nowhere.com> wrote in message
    > news:lGeve.1024551$w62.11337@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > > My hubby wanted to get a "big TV", so I did some research. I wanted a TV
    > > that could truly handle high definition and be usable ten years from now
    > > when HDTV will be the norm rather than the exception.
    >
    > I stopped right there. Nothing you buy now will be acceptable ten years
    from
    > now. Think how computers were ten years ago, and at that time, those of us
    > that started in 1980 felt that 1995 computers were pretty darn good
    > (remember 8.3 file names????!). Technology changes too fast, gets too
    much
    > better, and gets too much less expensive. Don't you agree?
    >
    >

    I agree with you on computers, but I don't agree that TVs will be obsolete
    in ten years. The technology may change fast, but changing the
    infrastructure to support TV technology is whole different story. With PCs,
    you only have to change one box. With TVs, you have cameras, video game
    systems, recording media, over the air broadcast infrastructure, satellite
    infrastructure, tuners, receivers, and on and on. It is a lot more than just
    changing out one box like a PC.

    TVs are a different technology than chips and memory. A color TV from the
    1960s would probably work just fine today and with enough adapters, you
    could hook up anything to it. So TV technology is very slowwwwww. I am
    assuming the slow change is due to the infrastructure that has to
    change.technology?

    At the rate HDTV is going, I think we will be lucky to have HDTV the norm in
    ten years. Don't they want 85% of households to have an HD tuner before they
    switch over?

    noone
  8. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    Thanks everyone for very informative responses.

    I looked at the Pioneer on the costco.com and I liked it. Unfortunately, the
    sale is over and we are not a Costco member. We are a member in Sams club.
    We may become a member just for the TV. Is the Pioneer a lot better than the
    Dell advertised by Sams?

    We have decided against the installation over the fireplace. My wife wants
    to cover the fireplace and use the wall for TV. I want to use another wall.
    I agree the fireplace wall is better but it will be expensive.

    We'll see what happens.

    Thanks again.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    "nonone" <noone@nowhere.com> wrote in message
    news:Cryve.1030182$w62.475954@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    >
    > "Z Man" <z1z@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:Yulve.10458$ik5.8715@fe12.lga...
    >>
    >> "nonone" <noone@nowhere.com> wrote in message
    >> news:lGeve.1024551$w62.11337@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    >> > My hubby wanted to get a "big TV", so I did some research. I wanted a
    >> > TV
    >> > that could truly handle high definition and be usable ten years from
    >> > now
    >> > when HDTV will be the norm rather than the exception.
    >>
    >> I stopped right there. Nothing you buy now will be acceptable ten years
    > from
    >> now. Think how computers were ten years ago, and at that time, those of
    >> us
    >> that started in 1980 felt that 1995 computers were pretty darn good
    >> (remember 8.3 file names????!). Technology changes too fast, gets too
    > much
    >> better, and gets too much less expensive. Don't you agree?
    >>
    >>
    >
    > I agree with you on computers, but I don't agree that TVs will be obsolete
    > in ten years. The technology may change fast, but changing the
    > infrastructure to support TV technology is whole different story. With
    > PCs,
    > you only have to change one box. With TVs, you have cameras, video game
    > systems, recording media, over the air broadcast infrastructure, satellite
    > infrastructure, tuners, receivers, and on and on. It is a lot more than
    > just
    > changing out one box like a PC.
    >
    > TVs are a different technology than chips and memory. A color TV from the
    > 1960s would probably work just fine today and with enough adapters, you
    > could hook up anything to it. So TV technology is very slowwwwww. I am
    > assuming the slow change is due to the infrastructure that has to
    > change.technology?
    >
    > At the rate HDTV is going, I think we will be lucky to have HDTV the norm
    > in
    > ten years. Don't they want 85% of households to have an HD tuner before
    > they
    > switch over?

    The norm for whom? For some of us, myself included, HDTV is the norm right
    now. Over the past couple of years, DirecTV has periodically added hi def
    channels to the point where I now don't watch standard definition. I get all
    the networks ABC, NBC, CBS, and Fox) in HDTV format, and I also get
    Showtime and HBO. Add to that DiscoveryHD, UHD, HDNet and HDNet Movies, and
    its enough TV to fill my schedule. Go one more step and add my Hidef DirecTV
    Tivo, and I am normally watching HDTV almost 100% of the time I have the set
    turned on. If you go back even two years, I was watching barely 10% hidef,
    and that was the norm. I like this norm a lot better. I get far more
    enjoyment from the enhanced video and sound. Yet, some people just don't
    care. I think they should watch whatever they want. Have you ever passed by
    a car blasting a loud distorted sound system that made you cringe? The
    person doing that actually likes it, and that's normal for them, and fine by
    me. 'Nuf said?
  10. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    Get the Pioneer.

    In article <ba168$42bf29c9$18d68135$14310@KNOLOGY.NET> "Ed"
    <Please@DontEmail.me> writes:

    >Thanks everyone for very informative responses.
    >
    >I looked at the Pioneer on the costco.com and I liked it. Unfortunately, the
    >sale is over and we are not a Costco member. We are a member in Sams club.
    >We may become a member just for the TV. Is the Pioneer a lot better than the
    >Dell advertised by Sams?
    >
    >We have decided against the installation over the fireplace. My wife wants
    >to cover the fireplace and use the wall for TV. I want to use another wall.
    >I agree the fireplace wall is better but it will be expensive.
    >
    >We'll see what happens.
    >
    >Thanks again.
    >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    I agree. I got the Pioneer. Honking box, though.

    On Sun, 26 Jun 2005 21:15:36 -0500, MrFixit@msn.com (Mr Fixit) wrote:

    >Get the Pioneer.
    >
    >In article <ba168$42bf29c9$18d68135$14310@KNOLOGY.NET> "Ed"
    ><Please@DontEmail.me> writes:
    >
    >>Thanks everyone for very informative responses.
    >>
    >>I looked at the Pioneer on the costco.com and I liked it. Unfortunately, the
    >>sale is over and we are not a Costco member. We are a member in Sams club.
    >>We may become a member just for the TV. Is the Pioneer a lot better than the
    >>Dell advertised by Sams?
    >>
    >>We have decided against the installation over the fireplace. My wife wants
    >>to cover the fireplace and use the wall for TV. I want to use another wall.
    >>I agree the fireplace wall is better but it will be expensive.
    >>
    >>We'll see what happens.
    >>
    >>Thanks again.
    >>
  12. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    What is Honking box?


    "Scribner" <walter3ca@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:fcavb1l8s35fhtg78jsjp4ianfjfc002lo@4ax.com...
    >I agree. I got the Pioneer. Honking box, though.
    >
    > On Sun, 26 Jun 2005 21:15:36 -0500, MrFixit@msn.com (Mr Fixit) wrote:
    >
    >>Get the Pioneer.
    >>
    >>In article <ba168$42bf29c9$18d68135$14310@KNOLOGY.NET> "Ed"
    >><Please@DontEmail.me> writes:
    >>
    >>>Thanks everyone for very informative responses.
    >>>
    >>>I looked at the Pioneer on the costco.com and I liked it. Unfortunately,
    >>>the
    >>>sale is over and we are not a Costco member. We are a member in Sams
    >>>club.
    >>>We may become a member just for the TV. Is the Pioneer a lot better than
    >>>the
    >>>Dell advertised by Sams?
    >>>
    >>>We have decided against the installation over the fireplace. My wife
    >>>wants
    >>>to cover the fireplace and use the wall for TV. I want to use another
    >>>wall.
    >>>I agree the fireplace wall is better but it will be expensive.
    >>>
    >>>We'll see what happens.
    >>>
    >>>Thanks again.
    >>>
    >
  13. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    Bigger than my car. A Costco guy had to disassemble it for me. He
    says that he does it all the time.

    On Mon, 27 Jun 2005 19:23:48 -0500, "Ed" <Please@DontEmail.me> wrote:

    >What is Honking box?
    >
    >
    >"Scribner" <walter3ca@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >news:fcavb1l8s35fhtg78jsjp4ianfjfc002lo@4ax.com...
    >>I agree. I got the Pioneer. Honking box, though.
    >>
    >> On Sun, 26 Jun 2005 21:15:36 -0500, MrFixit@msn.com (Mr Fixit) wrote:
    >>
    >>>Get the Pioneer.
    >>>
    >>>In article <ba168$42bf29c9$18d68135$14310@KNOLOGY.NET> "Ed"
    >>><Please@DontEmail.me> writes:
    >>>
    >>>>Thanks everyone for very informative responses.
    >>>>
    >>>>I looked at the Pioneer on the costco.com and I liked it. Unfortunately,
    >>>>the
    >>>>sale is over and we are not a Costco member. We are a member in Sams
    >>>>club.
    >>>>We may become a member just for the TV. Is the Pioneer a lot better than
    >>>>the
    >>>>Dell advertised by Sams?
    >>>>
    >>>>We have decided against the installation over the fireplace. My wife
    >>>>wants
    >>>>to cover the fireplace and use the wall for TV. I want to use another
    >>>>wall.
    >>>>I agree the fireplace wall is better but it will be expensive.
    >>>>
    >>>>We'll see what happens.
    >>>>
    >>>>Thanks again.
    >>>>
    >>
    >
  14. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    Tell you what, we installed our Sony 42" plasma over our unused fireplace,
    and couldn't be happier! Our living room has nothing but La-Z-boy recliners,
    so the viewing angle is absolutely perfect, much like a theater, actually.

    If you do decide to it yourself, make sure you have lots of help (big guys
    if possible.) My 4'11" wife helped me lift our 90 pound TV up to the mantle
    over the fireplace, then she said that she didn't think that she could get
    it up to the mount. There I was, holding the TV up against the wall on the
    mantle, all by lonesome, while she went and grabbed our daughter (4'10" at
    95 pounds) and some step stools, and all three of us finally managed to heft
    it into the mount. Damn near killed her, though! I had visions of my brand
    new multi-thousand dollar TV crashing to the floor, so I won't be trying
    THAT again without major help!

    Best of luck,

    Phil

    "Ed" <Please@DontEmail.me> wrote in message
    news:ba168$42bf29c9$18d68135$14310@KNOLOGY.NET...
    > Thanks everyone for very informative responses.
    >
    > I looked at the Pioneer on the costco.com and I liked it. Unfortunately,
    > the sale is over and we are not a Costco member. We are a member in Sams
    > club. We may become a member just for the TV. Is the Pioneer a lot better
    > than the Dell advertised by Sams?
    >
    > We have decided against the installation over the fireplace. My wife wants
    > to cover the fireplace and use the wall for TV. I want to use another
    > wall. I agree the fireplace wall is better but it will be expensive.
    >
    > We'll see what happens.
    >
    > Thanks again.
    >
    >
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