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nvidia 9000 series

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February 14, 2008 10:14:25 AM

anyone heard any new information on the 9000series release?

More about : nvidia 9000 series

February 14, 2008 10:23:05 AM

I've only seen about the 9600GT:

"Nvidia has informed the partners regarding the changes required to be performed to the GeForce 9600GT card in order to reduce overall transient. The NVVDD is change to 1.15V by placing a 0 ohm resistor at R587 and remove R561, R566, and R570. To enable load-line feature, a 0 ohm resistor is placed at R522 and 2.2nF capacitor is placed at C519 and R527 is removed. The cards are already fixed and launch date is set at 21st Feb 2008."

http://www.vr-zone.com/articles/GeForce_9600_GT_Voltage_Issue_Fixed/5556.html
February 14, 2008 10:27:38 AM

scooter7975 said:
anyone heard any new information on the 9000series release?


The 9800GX2 will come out in the middle of March, shortly thereafter (a few months) the 9800GTX along with the cheaper 9800GT are all based on the G80/G92 and will have full 128SP's and 24 ROPs. Nvidia is having trouble with running two 9800GX2's together in SLI, ATI isn't any better off in the area either. Nvidia has told its partners not to show off the 9800GX2 cards at Cebit.
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February 14, 2008 10:36:41 AM

Thanks guys. I guess its the best and worse news ive had this week. Im building a new machine with my taxes. I dont really like to wait but if theres one component i dont skimp on......Its my gpu. Do you figure prices will be close to the 8000series when it was released back in 4th quarter of '06?
February 14, 2008 11:20:44 AM

Should be. If you're going for the 9800GTX or 9800GX2 look at spending over $500-$600 for them.

From what I've heard they'll only be about 30% better at best over the 8800GTS. Not sure if its worth the wait and extra cash.
February 14, 2008 11:52:59 AM

The 9800GX2 looks to be simply two g92 cards slapped together. Not much to get excited about if you ask me unless it spurs them to develop better SLI drivers.

The 9800GTX is somewhat of a mystery to me. I don't think it's the new chip we've all been waiting for (GT200?) but I can't see it being a g92 either.

The 9600GT does look impressive though; better mainstream cards mean better looking games for all of us. It's what I like to call the lowest common denominator effect.
February 14, 2008 8:57:10 PM

homerdog said:
The 9800GX2 looks to be simply two g92 cards slapped together. Not much to get excited about if you ask me unless it spurs them to develop better SLI drivers.


Your not using SLI with one 9800GX2, therefore there are no scaling issues.
February 14, 2008 9:03:43 PM

Yes ya are.
February 14, 2008 9:25:36 PM

FireGS said:
Yes ya are.


Then would you care to comment on why ATI's 3870x2 doesn't need CrossFire for only one card, Nvidia is doing the same thing because that limits the 9800GX2's sales to only Nvidia mobo's and why would they shoot themselfs like that.

Quote:
Yes ya are.


Sorry I don't plan on buying one but thanks. :sarcastic: 
a c 86 U Graphics card
a b Î Nvidia
February 14, 2008 9:43:57 PM

Sys its called internal sli, just like the 3870X2 is internally a crossfire setup and the drivers are treating it like that...
February 14, 2008 9:44:03 PM

Erm.. both the 3870x2 and the 9800GX2 use sli/crossfire respectively, if you are disagreeing with that? Its done ON the cards and SLI is only limited to nvidias motherboards when you use 2 cards, 9800GX2 is SLI on a single card. One PCI-E slot = single card :) 

As SLI/crossfire drivers improve so will the performance of the cards respectively.


Although I may have just misinterpreted your posts as this is common knowledge.

February 14, 2008 11:50:07 PM

Hatman said:
Erm.. both the 3870x2 and the 9800GX2 use sli/crossfire respectively, if you are disagreeing with that? Its done ON the cards and SLI is only limited to nvidias motherboards when you use 2 cards, 9800GX2 is SLI on a single card. One PCI-E slot = single card :) 

As SLI/crossfire drivers improve so will the performance of the cards respectively.


Although I may have just misinterpreted your posts as this is common knowledge.


What I meant is that with one graphics card with dual GPU's is not SLI in the same way as having two cards in SLI. SLI = two cards working together on the same mobo.

Your also only using one 16x slot/lanes with one 9800GX2, I saw a review of the 3870x2 on an Nvidia mobo that worked perfectly. You could call it SLI on a stick though.


February 15, 2008 12:00:26 AM

G92 is actually 9 series.
February 15, 2008 1:01:26 AM

the 9800 GX2 is 2 g92 (8800 GTS) put together on 2 seperate boards combined together by SLI. the 3870 x2 is 2 GPU's on one board. both only use 1 PCIe slot, and the SLI/Crossfire drivers affect both.
February 15, 2008 2:01:14 AM

Quick question, I understand the launch date is Feb 21st. Is that when nvidia releases the new chip design and we have to wait several months for the board makers to release their cards? Or is that when the new cards will be available?

I guess I have another question, how quickly do prices fall on the 8 series cards?
February 15, 2008 2:54:14 AM

systemlord said:
Your not using SLI with one 9800GX2, therefore there are no scaling issues.

A dual GPU card may not be SLI in the traditional sense but it certainly will share the scaling issues that plague current SLI implementations.
February 15, 2008 2:54:46 AM

systemlord said:
What I meant is that with one graphics card with dual GPU's is not SLI in the same way as having two cards in SLI. SLI = two cards working together on the same mobo.

Your also only using one 16x slot/lanes with one 9800GX2, I saw a review of the 3870x2 on an Nvidia mobo that worked perfectly. You could call it SLI on a stick though.


:lol:  As everyone said... Its a SLI/Crossfire built into one package. If you've read any of the reviews out there on the 3870X2 they break it down pretty simply. Theres actually a Crossfire chip and bridges both GPUs. Its true that it recognizes it as one card and its true that it will work for any chipset but fact remains... its still a crossfire setup.

http://www.anandtech.com/video/showdoc.aspx?i=3209&p=2
Quote:
Single-board CrossFire
The Radeon HD 3870 X2 features a single CrossFire connector at the top of the PCB, meaning you'll eventually be able to add a second card to it to enable 3X or 4X CrossFire modes (depending on whether you add another 3870 X2 or just a single 3870).

Unfortunately driver support for the ATI CrossFireX technology isn't quite there yet, although AMD tells us to expect something in the March timeframe. Given that CeBIT is at the beginning of March we're guessing we'll see it at the show.

As we alluded to earlier, the fact that the 3870 X2 features two GPUs on a single board means that it doesn't rely on chipset support to enable its multi-GPU functionality: it'll work in any motherboard that would support a standard 3870.

Driver support is also seamless; you don't have to enable CrossFire or fiddle with any settings, the card just works. AMD's Catalyst drivers attempt to force an Alternate Frame Render (AFR) mode whenever possible, but be warned that if there are issues with the 3870 X2's multi-GPU rendering modes and a game you may only get single-GPU performance until AMD can fix the problem. In our testing we didn't encounter any such issues but as new games and OS revisions come out, as we saw with the GeForce 7950 GX2, there's always the chance.

AMD insists that by releasing a multi-GPU card it will encourage developers to take CrossFire more seriously. It is also committed to releasing future single-card, multi-GPU solutions but we'll just have to wait and see how true that is.


http://www.tomshardware.com/2008/01/28/ati_r680_the_rag...

Quote:
Technically, this Radeon HD 3870 X2 can really be understood as a CrossFire of two HD 3870 on a single PCB. The card only integrates a PCI Express 1.1 bridge to connect the two GPUs. They communicate via a bidirectional bus that has 16 lines for a bandwidth of 2 x 4 Gb/s. Even the access time shouldn't be significantly lower than that of a classic CrossFire solutions based on two distinct cards. Thus, this explains why we'll have to wait for drivers supporting Quad-CrossFire to pair two Radeon HD 3870 X2 on a single motherboard. On the other hand, a chipset supporting CrossFire isn't required to make this card work.


Also these reviews touch on the fact that not all games support Crossfire therefore suffering in performance.

This will be (for the most part) true for the the GX2.



February 15, 2008 3:10:42 AM

Erm...
February 15, 2008 4:12:14 AM

pchoi04 said:
:lol:  As everyone said... Its a SLI/Crossfire built into one package. If you've read any of the reviews out there on the 3870X2 they break it down pretty simply. Theres actually a Crossfire chip and bridges both GPUs. Its true that it recognizes it as one card and its true that it will work for any chipset but fact remains... its still a crossfire setup.


Quote:
You could call it SLI on a stick though.


Did you miss that? What I was saying was a dual GPU card may not be SLI in the traditional sense, not saying it isn't. Like I've already stated, "You could call it SLI on a stick though".


February 15, 2008 4:49:03 AM

systemlord said:
Quote:
You could call it SLI on a stick though.


Did you miss that? What I was saying was a dual GPU card may not be SLI in the traditional sense, not saying it isn't. Like I've already stated, "You could call it SLI on a stick though".



Yes... Sorry I missed that one statement after all that nonsense on how the 3870X2 was not a Crossfire setup and how the GX2 will not have any scaling issues, but I'll let you sly. ;) 
February 15, 2008 9:16:42 AM

pchoi04 said:
Yes... Sorry I missed that one statement after all that nonsense on how the 3870X2 was not a Crossfire setup and how the GX2 will not have any scaling issues, but I'll let you sly. ;) 


Smart move. :hello: 
!