restore CD, what exactly is it?

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

It seems that computer manufactures are reducing costs
by supplying less CDs. I want a windows XP
machine that will allow me to rebuild the system from
scratch (after reformatting the disk). I do not want
a CD that only updates system files for an already
existing XP installation.

I see that many computers come with a restore CD.
What exactly is that?
I can imagine several possibilities:
1. A CD that will reload system files, onto an existing
XP installation. This might be used after
a virus has removed critical system files, and you
do not want to install from scratch.
2. An image file (.iso) that will rebuild a system from
scratch (after reformatting the disk).
This is typically an image of the system
after it was built at the factory, with all the
updates and applications.
3. A windows XP CD (from MS).

And, sometimes it is called a recover CD.
Don't know if that is different than a restore CD?

I am looking at emachines, HP, gateway and DELL.
Can you make any general statements regarding their
policy on CDs? Such as: HP always provides
a MS windows CD.
13 answers Last reply
More about restore
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Brian,
    Thanks.
    To be clear, a restore/recover CD will do both:
    A. Restore a system after reformatting disk.
    B. Restore system files on an existing XP system
    (This is an over the top install).


    Brian A. wrote:
    > Recover applications that may be corrupt or missing with an over the top
    > install.
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    The Dell PC that I bought a few months back came with full software
    reinstallation CDs. The Windows XP version was Dell OEM, but it was
    still the full CD's.

    Brian

    <williams12345@excite.com> wrote in message
    news:1122665560.567247.117910@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > It seems that computer manufactures are reducing costs
    > by supplying less CDs. I want a windows XP
    > machine that will allow me to rebuild the system from
    > scratch (after reformatting the disk). I do not want
    > a CD that only updates system files for an already
    > existing XP installation.
    >
    > I see that many computers come with a restore CD.
    > What exactly is that?
    > I can imagine several possibilities:
    > 1. A CD that will reload system files, onto an existing
    > XP installation. This might be used after
    > a virus has removed critical system files, and you
    > do not want to install from scratch.
    > 2. An image file (.iso) that will rebuild a system from
    > scratch (after reformatting the disk).
    > This is typically an image of the system
    > after it was built at the factory, with all the
    > updates and applications.
    > 3. A windows XP CD (from MS).
    >
    > And, sometimes it is called a recover CD.
    > Don't know if that is different than a restore CD?
    >
    > I am looking at emachines, HP, gateway and DELL.
    > Can you make any general statements regarding their
    > policy on CDs? Such as: HP always provides
    > a MS windows CD.
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Restore and/or Recovery CD's supplied by the OEM are used to:

    Restore the system to the original factory state when it left the factory.
    This will first reformat the drive before reinstalling the OS and apps.

    Recover applications that may be corrupt or missing with an over the top
    install.

    --

    Brian A. Sesko { MS MVP_Shell/User }
    Conflicts start where information lacks.
    http://basconotw.mvps.org/

    Suggested posting do's/don'ts: http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    How to ask a question: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/555375


    <williams12345@excite.com> wrote in message
    news:1122665560.567247.117910@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > It seems that computer manufactures are reducing costs
    > by supplying less CDs. I want a windows XP
    > machine that will allow me to rebuild the system from
    > scratch (after reformatting the disk). I do not want
    > a CD that only updates system files for an already
    > existing XP installation.
    >
    > I see that many computers come with a restore CD.
    > What exactly is that?
    > I can imagine several possibilities:
    > 1. A CD that will reload system files, onto an existing
    > XP installation. This might be used after
    > a virus has removed critical system files, and you
    > do not want to install from scratch.
    > 2. An image file (.iso) that will rebuild a system from
    > scratch (after reformatting the disk).
    > This is typically an image of the system
    > after it was built at the factory, with all the
    > updates and applications.
    > 3. A windows XP CD (from MS).
    >
    > And, sometimes it is called a recover CD.
    > Don't know if that is different than a restore CD?
    >
    > I am looking at emachines, HP, gateway and DELL.
    > Can you make any general statements regarding their
    > policy on CDs? Such as: HP always provides
    > a MS windows CD.
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Dell may well be the only vendor on your list that supplies a Windows XP
    CD..

    --
    Mike Hall
    MVP - Windows Shell/User


    <williams12345@excite.com> wrote in message
    news:1122665560.567247.117910@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > It seems that computer manufactures are reducing costs
    > by supplying less CDs. I want a windows XP
    > machine that will allow me to rebuild the system from
    > scratch (after reformatting the disk). I do not want
    > a CD that only updates system files for an already
    > existing XP installation.
    >
    > I see that many computers come with a restore CD.
    > What exactly is that?
    > I can imagine several possibilities:
    > 1. A CD that will reload system files, onto an existing
    > XP installation. This might be used after
    > a virus has removed critical system files, and you
    > do not want to install from scratch.
    > 2. An image file (.iso) that will rebuild a system from
    > scratch (after reformatting the disk).
    > This is typically an image of the system
    > after it was built at the factory, with all the
    > updates and applications.
    > 3. A windows XP CD (from MS).
    >
    > And, sometimes it is called a recover CD.
    > Don't know if that is different than a restore CD?
    >
    > I am looking at emachines, HP, gateway and DELL.
    > Can you make any general statements regarding their
    > policy on CDs? Such as: HP always provides
    > a MS windows CD.
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    It depends on the manufacturer. IIRC not all manufacturers supply a disk that
    does anything other than format/reinstall. Some don't supply a disk at all, yet
    store the Recovery/Restore files on a hidden partition.
    To mention a few:
    Gateway computers now have all of your drivers, applications, and operating
    system backup files installed on a protected recovery partition of your hard
    drive.
    http://support.gateway.com/s/SOFTWARE/Medialess//MLXPH1/MLXPH1asi.shtml

    HP PCs that ship with Microsoft Windows XP do not come with recovery CDs.
    Instead, they use a hidden space (partition) on the hard drive to store the
    recovery information.
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?lc=en&lang=en&cc=us&product=468947&dlc=en&docname=bph07145

    Others have mentioned Dell.


    --

    Brian A. Sesko { MS MVP_Shell/User }
    Conflicts start where information lacks.
    http://basconotw.mvps.org/

    Suggested posting do's/don'ts: http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    How to ask a question: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/555375


    <williams12345@excite.com> wrote in message
    news:1122668099.082538.75180@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > Brian,
    > Thanks.
    > To be clear, a restore/recover CD will do both:
    > A. Restore a system after reformatting disk.
    > B. Restore system files on an existing XP system
    > (This is an over the top install).
    >
    >
    > Brian A. wrote:
    >> Recover applications that may be corrupt or missing with an over the top
    >> install.
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:emshycIlFHA.3336@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
    Mike Hall (MS-MVP) <mike.hall.mail@sympatico.ca> typed:

    > Dell may well be the only vendor on your list that supplies a
    > Windows
    > XP CD..


    And if what I've heard recently is true, even they don't do it
    anymore.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup


    > <williams12345@excite.com> wrote in message
    > news:1122665560.567247.117910@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    >> It seems that computer manufactures are reducing costs
    >> by supplying less CDs. I want a windows XP
    >> machine that will allow me to rebuild the system from
    >> scratch (after reformatting the disk). I do not want
    >> a CD that only updates system files for an already
    >> existing XP installation.
    >>
    >> I see that many computers come with a restore CD.
    >> What exactly is that?
    >> I can imagine several possibilities:
    >> 1. A CD that will reload system files, onto an existing
    >> XP installation. This might be used after
    >> a virus has removed critical system files, and you
    >> do not want to install from scratch.
    >> 2. An image file (.iso) that will rebuild a system from
    >> scratch (after reformatting the disk).
    >> This is typically an image of the system
    >> after it was built at the factory, with all the
    >> updates and applications.
    >> 3. A windows XP CD (from MS).
    >>
    >> And, sometimes it is called a recover CD.
    >> Don't know if that is different than a restore CD?
    >>
    >> I am looking at emachines, HP, gateway and DELL.
    >> Can you make any general statements regarding their
    >> policy on CDs? Such as: HP always provides
    >> a MS windows CD.
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Restore or recovery disks are used to quickly re-image your operating system
    and software back to your hard drive. Basically they return the system back
    to factory state. In other words how it was when you first purchased the pc.
    If you want to be in control of the operating system so that you can format
    the drive and install the operating system yourself rather than simply
    install everything that the manufacturer of yuor pc wants you to, then you
    are better off buying a retail boxed copy of windows xp. It does bump up the
    price of a new pc though because the retailer won't swap the oem version he
    has already installed on the pc for a retail version. He/she will simply
    prefer to sell you the boxed retail version. What you do with it after won't
    bother the retailer. He/she has imply made another sale.

    --
    John Barnett MVP
    Associate Expert
    http://xphelpandsupport.mvps.org


    <williams12345@excite.com> wrote in message
    news:1122665560.567247.117910@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > It seems that computer manufactures are reducing costs
    > by supplying less CDs. I want a windows XP
    > machine that will allow me to rebuild the system from
    > scratch (after reformatting the disk). I do not want
    > a CD that only updates system files for an already
    > existing XP installation.
    >
    > I see that many computers come with a restore CD.
    > What exactly is that?
    > I can imagine several possibilities:
    > 1. A CD that will reload system files, onto an existing
    > XP installation. This might be used after
    > a virus has removed critical system files, and you
    > do not want to install from scratch.
    > 2. An image file (.iso) that will rebuild a system from
    > scratch (after reformatting the disk).
    > This is typically an image of the system
    > after it was built at the factory, with all the
    > updates and applications.
    > 3. A windows XP CD (from MS).
    >
    > And, sometimes it is called a recover CD.
    > Don't know if that is different than a restore CD?
    >
    > I am looking at emachines, HP, gateway and DELL.
    > Can you make any general statements regarding their
    > policy on CDs? Such as: HP always provides
    > a MS windows CD.
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    John Barnett MVP wrote:

    > Restore or recovery disks are used to quickly re-image your operating system
    > and software back to your hard drive. Basically they return the system back
    > to factory state. In other words how it was when you first purchased the pc.
    > If you want to be in control of the operating system so that you can format
    > the drive and install the operating system yourself rather than simply
    > install everything that the manufacturer of yuor pc wants you to, then you
    > are better off buying a retail boxed copy of windows xp. It does bump up the
    > price of a new pc though because the retailer won't swap the oem version he
    > has already installed on the pc for a retail version. He/she will simply
    > prefer to sell you the boxed retail version. What you do with it after won't
    > bother the retailer. He/she has imply made another sale.
    >

    All the more reason to buy a generic custom built.
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    - HP does not provide any media. There is a hidden partition on the hard
    drive for restore. This is, of course, useless in the event of a hard drive
    crash and a thoroughly unacceptable practice in my view.
    - Dell used to provide a true XP CD (OEM version), and discontinued the
    practice several months ago, with some exceptions for the business division.
    They provide a one time mechanism to burn an OS CD and, allegedly, will
    provide one free on request.
    - EMachines - used to provide media. Don't know currently.

    Vendor recovery disks and partitions vary and you have to research the
    specifics. Some recovery media will only perform a full destructive
    reinstall and others may be used for repair or reinstall.

    The failure to provide a standard OS CD is a practice all consumers should
    complain about loudly. It may be needed for troubleshooting (like a boot to
    System Restore), users are cheated out of optional components (like ntbackup
    for XP HOME), hidden partitions are useless in a disk failure, etc. etc. It
    is widely believed that this practice is due, in part, to pressure from
    Microsoft no to include media that could possibly be pirated, though
    specifics on this are hard to come by. Clearly it is also driven by profit
    for the manufacturer to save a few dollars. I appreciate the tight margins
    in the business, but this is a little like not including a spare tire and
    jack with a new car.
    --

    <williams12345@excite.com> wrote in message
    news:1122665560.567247.117910@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > It seems that computer manufactures are reducing costs
    > by supplying less CDs. I want a windows XP
    > machine that will allow me to rebuild the system from
    > scratch (after reformatting the disk). I do not want
    > a CD that only updates system files for an already
    > existing XP installation.
    >
    > I see that many computers come with a restore CD.
    > What exactly is that?
    > I can imagine several possibilities:
    > 1. A CD that will reload system files, onto an existing
    > XP installation. This might be used after
    > a virus has removed critical system files, and you
    > do not want to install from scratch.
    > 2. An image file (.iso) that will rebuild a system from
    > scratch (after reformatting the disk).
    > This is typically an image of the system
    > after it was built at the factory, with all the
    > updates and applications.
    > 3. A windows XP CD (from MS).
    >
    > And, sometimes it is called a recover CD.
    > Don't know if that is different than a restore CD?
    >
    > I am looking at emachines, HP, gateway and DELL.
    > Can you make any general statements regarding their
    > policy on CDs? Such as: HP always provides
    > a MS windows CD.
    >
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    On Fri, 29 Jul 2005 18:40:56 -0700, Ken Blake wrote:

    > And if what I've heard recently is true, even they don't do it
    > anymore.

    If I understood that recent thread correctly, I think you can still get the
    Dell OEM CD (the OEM generic install with Dell name on it) if you request
    it specifically.

    --
    Sharon F
    MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:urBevQrlFHA.2988@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
    Sharon F <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> typed:

    > On Fri, 29 Jul 2005 18:40:56 -0700, Ken Blake wrote:
    >
    >> And if what I've heard recently is true, even they don't do it
    >> anymore.
    >
    > If I understood that recent thread correctly, I think you can
    > still
    > get the Dell OEM CD (the OEM generic install with Dell name on
    > it) if
    > you request it specifically.


    Thanks, Sharon. do you know if it's free or is there a charge for
    it?

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    On Mon, 1 Aug 2005 11:51:58 -0700, Ken Blake wrote:

    > Thanks, Sharon. do you know if it's free or is there a charge for
    > it?

    Keep in mind my memory is not the best but I think it was said: recovery
    disk set at time of order $10 and OEM XP CD free (can request anytime).

    (One of the MVPs posted the details in winxp.general after asking their
    source at Dell for details. So if my recollection is wrong, the right info
    is there somewhere.)

    A friend of mine posted in that same thread that he received an OEM XP CD
    by request. There was a $29 "charge" on his account to document the
    order/shipment but no invoice issued.

    --
    Sharon F
    MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:eVDWz5slFHA.2484@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
    Sharon F <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> typed:

    > On Mon, 1 Aug 2005 11:51:58 -0700, Ken Blake wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks, Sharon. do you know if it's free or is there a charge
    >> for
    >> it?
    >
    > Keep in mind my memory is not the best but I think it was said:
    > recovery disk set at time of order $10 and OEM XP CD free (can
    > request anytime).
    >
    > (One of the MVPs posted the details in winxp.general after
    > asking
    > their source at Dell for details. So if my recollection is
    > wrong, the
    > right info is there somewhere.)
    >
    > A friend of mine posted in that same thread that he received an
    > OEM
    > XP CD by request. There was a $29 "charge" on his account to
    > document
    > the order/shipment but no invoice issued.


    Thanks, Sharon.


    Ken Blake

    kblake@mvps.org
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