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I'm worried that i have damaged my CPU.

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March 1, 2008 6:23:05 PM

Hello!

I'm worried that i might have damagede my CPU upon placing it in it's socket and applying the CPU cooler on the top. It is the first time i collect a computer and the only knowledge i have is from the internet (which i have studied carefully)

My Motherboard is a MSI p35 neo2-FR (lovely motherboard by the way).
My CPU cooler is a Xigmat HDT-s1283.
And finally my CPU is a E8400.

I really saved a lot of money for this PC so i have taken some pictures and described in detail what i did (i'm so worried :( ).
-
If you see any flaws please write it down!


How i installed the CPU:

- I followed the guide that came with my Intel CPU. I swung out the little handle in the side and up in an about 120 degree angle. I then swung the CPU protection shield up in a 120 degree angle and removed the plastic protecting the CPU.
- I carefully placed the CPU in the socket and it seemed to be in the right spot since the CPU surface was at the same level as the CPU socket. The two half-moon holes in the CPU was also aligned with the surface of the CPU. (this really seemed right).
- I tipped the CPU iron shield protection on to the cpu and it was really tight and while pushing down it made a little crackling noise, nothing big. Then i locked it. And it looked ok.

Questions:
1a - Is it supposed to be that tight when you lock it with the shield plate?
1b - Could i in anyway have placed the CPU wrong? (i know it's hard for you to answer but think of it like this: Is it hard to notice if it's positioned the wrong way?) I have seen a lot of clips on youtube and everything seemed right, it was just so damn tight.


Install the CPU fan.

- I assemled the CPU fan itself correctly.
- I placed the thermal grease onto the CPU heatsink (not too much, a transparant layer).
- I placed the CPU cooler onto the CPU.
- My motherboard is positioned onto a flat surface with a thin black foam layer at the bottom and the anti-static plastic ontop.


- I had a lot of trouble getting it stuck to the motherboard. I tried for 1 hour as hard as i could press down onto it. I tried so many times! I only pressed with major force onto the four black plastic clips and not the CPU cooler itself (allthough mild pressure on the CPU cooler itself might had happend doing my frustration and rage).
- Yes i admit i was frustrated and might have pressed too hard (why i'm writing this] onto the plastic clips.
- A piece of the CPU cooler fell off. Nothing serious (or is it?)


- I finally got it down and stuck onto the surface. Everything looks perfect, it sits very tight, i can't even turn it in any way.




Questions:
2a - Could i have damaged my motherboard by pressing that hard onto the surface?
2b - Could i have damaged my CPU by pressing so hard onto the four plastic clips (I might have applied mildly pressure on top of the CPU Heatsink(could by why a CPU fan part fell off - picture)

2c - The little metal plate. Does it make any difference if i remove? it might fall off when it's turned on
2d - Upon removal will this cause my CPU-fan to loose noticeable preformance (0,1+ degrees)? (it's just one metal plate out of. 1. . 2. . . 3 . . 22. . . A lot!)

I'm sorry i had to write such a long "letter" but i am really worried! I've spend all my money on this CPU, motherboard and fan! and if they are broken i will be ever so depressed! (it would take over a month to get a new chip (E8400) here in Denmark!).

Anyhow, i thank you kindly for reading my paper! Thanks! :)  really! :) 

More about : worried damaged cpu

March 1, 2008 7:07:04 PM

That "CPU shield protection" piece of plastic is only for protecting the motherboard socket. It is not part of a running system. You use it only for shipping the motherboard when no CPU is in place. If it has a small crack, that should be no problem when transporting the motherboard alone as it'll still protect the socket pins.

Removing one of the numerous aluminum fins from the heatsink is also not a problem.

Once you take out that piece of plastic, putting down the lever to lock the CPU should be much easier, as should installing the heatsink.
a b V Motherboard
March 1, 2008 7:08:44 PM

possibly..not likely. boot it up and see what happens. the piece that broke isn't a big deal, don't worry about it.
the only 'flaw' really i see in your procedure is that you apply the thermal compound to the cpu, not the heatsink.

the amount of pressure you have to put on a cooler just depends on the cooler. i remember i had a heck of a time putting new coolers on some athlons i had a while back. they worked just fine, even after looong times of pushes and pressure.
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March 1, 2008 7:18:23 PM

WR said:
That "CPU shield protection" piece of plastic is only for protecting the motherboard socket. It is not part of a running system. You use it only for shipping the motherboard when no CPU is in place. If it has a small crack, that should be no problem when transporting the motherboard alone as it'll still protect the socket pins.

Removing one of the numerous aluminum fins from the heatsink is also not a problem.

Once you take out that piece of plastic, putting down the lever to lock the CPU should be much easier, as should installing the heatsink.


I did not lock it with the plastic shield ofc.
On my socket there is a shield made of some kind of iron. To protect the CPU when it's seated. :)  I can see that you get confused.

Thanks mate! :) 
March 1, 2008 7:21:08 PM

frozenlead said:
possibly..not likely. boot it up and see what happens. the piece that broke isn't a big deal, don't worry about it.
the only 'flaw' really i see in your procedure is that you apply the thermal compound to the cpu, not the heatsink.

the amount of pressure you have to put on a cooler just depends on the cooler. i remember i had a heck of a time putting new coolers on some athlons i had a while back. they worked just fine, even after looong times of pushes and pressure.


thank you for your answer :)  That cheered me up. Also, i'm glad that i can remove that iron plate on the heatsink, it was a bit anoying (kept falling off).

I actually only placed the thermal grease onto the heatsink, not the CPU itself. :)  (i'm sorry for the misunderstandings).

Thank you! :) 
a b à CPUs
March 1, 2008 8:01:02 PM

Have you tried it out yet....

It should still work....
March 1, 2008 8:22:11 PM

Nah i havn't.

The fact is that it is the first time i build a computer and. . . . it takes a while to get it all right! :) 
I will at some point within the next few days have it fully assembled and then i will report back if there was any problems.

This little incident just created another problem, because if i power it up and nothing happends i would be terrified to death that i might broke my CPU!! and then there's a 95% chance that it's everything else than the CPU, but i will still have my doubts! :(  that's the problem.
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March 1, 2008 8:28:12 PM

Moondrinker said:
Nah i havn't.

The fact is that it is the first time i build a computer and. . . . it takes a while to get it all right! :) 
I will at some point within the next few days have it fully assembled and then i will report back if there was any problems.

This little incident just created another problem, because if i power it up and nothing happends i would be terrified to death that i might broke my CPU!! and then there's a 95% chance that it's everything else than the CPU, but i will still have my doubts! :(  that's the problem.


I understand when its your first time you want to make sure its all good but don't doubt yourself. When I built may first PC(back in the PGA478 days yay!!!) I was nervous too. But after I got it all together and booted it and it posted I was happy.

The new LGA775 is different. PGA478 had the pins on the CPU. LGA775 has the pins on the socket. Well they are not pins really. They are tiny balls that give better contact that the pins ever did. When I built my current system mine made a slight noise too but I just thought it was the protection plate being pushed down. And it booted fine the first time and ever since.
March 1, 2008 8:50:51 PM

Heh, you should have no worries, I just bought that exact cooler myself, and no doubt it was the root of all your frustrations.

The push pins on that bitch WOULD NOT lock down for me, regardless of pressure, and one side would pop off when I got the other side down. It was by far the most frustrating experience in my 4+ years of building.

I took less precautions than you, no foam and anti-static bag, and was bending and stressing the hell out of my mobo in pure rage, on the verge of chunking the cooler into the wall and sledge hammering it. I finally ended up using the mounting bar and backplate from my old Zalman CNPS9500, and since it was not designed for this cooler, it actually took even more pressure to secure it, and slides around a bit.

But guess what? After all the seeming abuse and improper mounting, my comp booted fine with temps 6 degrees below my old Zalman, enough to push my old trusty E6400 from 3.2 to 3.4, whoopy-frickin-do!

Sounds like you did everything just fine, even overly-precaution by my lax standards (Put the thermal grease on the heatsink instead of CPU? Pfft, there's no difference, I put it on the CPU to assure I get the whole thing covered). You'd be surprised how rugged mobos can be. Good luck with everything else, and I'll doubt you'll have much trouble hitting those tasty 4Ghz!
March 1, 2008 10:13:18 PM

As far as I can remember hearing a crunch while locking down an LGA775 CPU is normal, from the little gold leads rubbing against the metal pads on the cpu. Sounds like other than a poorly designed cooler fastening system on that one, you did just fine. Just make sure that you can still mount your motherboard into the case with the HSF in place. Going by your pics and description all should go well though, the only other challenge could be properly mounting into the case, depending on what you have.

Now as far as HSF installation goes, the only ones I've ever had major issues with was the socketA coolers on the Athlon XP's, the one that came with the retail processors took a lot of pressure to latch, and with the XP's having the die more or less exposed, you get my drift.
March 1, 2008 11:54:56 PM

Coolers are a pain to put in. I thought I was gonna break my mobo when I built my first computer.
March 2, 2008 6:47:29 AM

Hm......your motherbord yet count down in yo'wos,cooler is OK back
March 2, 2008 6:56:58 PM

xjrjfcs said:
Hm......your motherbord yet count down in yo'wos,cooler is OK back


eh?
March 2, 2008 7:03:30 PM

JuiceJones said:
Heh, you should have no worries, I just bought that exact cooler myself, and no doubt it was the root of all your frustrations.

The push pins on that bitch WOULD NOT lock down for me, regardless of pressure, and one side would pop off when I got the other side down. It was by far the most frustrating experience in my 4+ years of building.

I took less precautions than you, no foam and anti-static bag, and was bending and stressing the hell out of my mobo in pure rage, on the verge of chunking the cooler into the wall and sledge hammering it. I finally ended up using the mounting bar and backplate from my old Zalman CNPS9500, and since it was not designed for this cooler, it actually took even more pressure to secure it, and slides around a bit.

But guess what? After all the seeming abuse and improper mounting, my comp booted fine with temps 6 degrees below my old Zalman, enough to push my old trusty E6400 from 3.2 to 3.4, whoopy-frickin-do!

Sounds like you did everything just fine, even overly-precaution by my lax standards (Put the thermal grease on the heatsink instead of CPU? Pfft, there's no difference, I put it on the CPU to assure I get the whole thing covered). You'd be surprised how rugged mobos can be. Good luck with everything else, and I'll doubt you'll have much trouble hitting those tasty 4Ghz!


Exactly what happend to me! It's impossible to mount! It might preform well but the fact that it's so hard to mount does not make me satisfied with this product. Furthermore, mounting the fan itself was also pain!
Thanks lad! :)  actually, 4ghz is what i'm going for. It should give most preformance for the money (there's a big leap from 3.6ghz to 4ghz according to the various statistics found on the internet).

It's also a fine motherboard and i'm very happy about my build so far, it's just that damn cooler! Well, i can't recommend it, that's for sure. (How does it preform? I bought it because it outpreforms Scythe Ninja rev.b and it seems very big with a lot of potential.)

Cheers! and thanks! :) 
March 2, 2008 7:08:28 PM

Mathos said:
As far as I can remember hearing a crunch while locking down an LGA775 CPU is normal, from the little gold leads rubbing against the metal pads on the cpu. Sounds like other than a poorly designed cooler fastening system on that one, you did just fine. Just make sure that you can still mount your motherboard into the case with the HSF in place. Going by your pics and description all should go well though, the only other challenge could be properly mounting into the case, depending on what you have.

Now as far as HSF installation goes, the only ones I've ever had major issues with was the socketA coolers on the Athlon XP's, the one that came with the retail processors took a lot of pressure to latch, and with the XP's having the die more or less exposed, you get my drift.


That's a relief. I thought it to be too tight and cracking noises are never good. :) 

Cheers
March 2, 2008 7:34:40 PM

I had a hard time with my cooler for this build. The tunic tower required a clip for the AM2 board but did not specifi so I thought I had to remove the retension frame. Then found out the thing would not fit then I saw te clip and put it on. Now I'm worried that the heatsink will fall over on my 8800 Ulra. lol luckly it has not and has been over a month.
March 2, 2008 9:33:29 PM

Moondrinker said:
Exactly what happend to me! It's impossible to mount! It might preform well but the fact that it's so hard to mount does not make me satisfied with this product. Furthermore, mounting the fan itself was also pain!


Oh geez, I know, I was leery of the push-pins in the first place, but with all the positive reviews and exceptionally cheap price, I took my chances. After the 3+ hours of pulling my hair out and worry of breaking things, I never would of bought the damn thing. The fan was a pain too, I probably had pulled it on and off at least four times between the push-pins popping off and re-mounting it, and as we both know, this is not a tooless process. I had to use needle-nose pliers to pull the rubber tabs out, and a screwdriver to push them in, occasionally bending the fins. Xigmatek could have a real winner if they took some cues and included optional screw-mounting. I don't know why they'd go with push pins on such a beast anyway.

Oh, and to top it all off, the price dropped ten bucks on it right after I finally got it in there -_-
March 4, 2008 12:15:40 PM

Ok guys! it works!! I think! :) 

I'm really happy! :)  but i don't know what to do next, so i need some help!

When i turn on the switch the computer starts but then it quickly turns off again. Then it starts a few seconds after.

Then there is a screen, i think you guys call it the POST screen (i have an MSI motherboard and there's a picture of a aircraft when i turn the computer on, then it says press tab. . .).

It passes this screen and says the following:

"Reboot and select proper boot device or insert boot media in selected boot device and pres a key."

What now? :) 

(i don't have much time, i have to go to work, i will come back later and give you some more detail if needed)
March 4, 2008 12:27:50 PM

Put in your Windows XP/Vista DVD and select your DVD/CD drive as your boot device. Windows setup should start and you can start installing your OS.
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a b V Motherboard
March 4, 2008 1:33:21 PM

^what he said + the boot order can be found in BIOS, hit del during post to get into bios.

Looks like your build is working just fine, congrats! :D 
March 4, 2008 4:22:33 PM

JuiceJones said:
Oh geez, I know, I was leery of the push-pins in the first place, but with all the positive reviews and exceptionally cheap price, I took my chances. After the 3+ hours of pulling my hair out and worry of breaking things, I never would of bought the damn thing. The fan was a pain too, I probably had pulled it on and off at least four times between the push-pins popping off and re-mounting it, and as we both know, this is not a tooless process. I had to use needle-nose pliers to pull the rubber tabs out, and a screwdriver to push them in, occasionally bending the fins. Xigmatek could have a real winner if they took some cues and included optional screw-mounting. I don't know why they'd go with push pins on such a beast anyway.

Oh, and to top it all off, the price dropped ten bucks on it right after I finally got it in there -_-



FAIL

If your CPU overheats I will buy it off you. ;) 
March 4, 2008 6:58:18 PM

Thanatos421 said:
Put in your Windows XP/Vista DVD and select your DVD/CD drive as your boot device. Windows setup should start and you can start installing your OS.


oh, ok, i figured that i had to update my BIOS before i could use the computer since i'm running with E8400 on a P35 motherboard that shouldn't* support the CPU.

Well, that's cool. Thank you guys! :) 
March 4, 2008 7:16:18 PM

If it POSTs, then a BIOS update isn't necessary.
March 4, 2008 7:45:30 PM

I have the xigmatek heatsink also.

Don't listen to anything anyone says regardless of the pushpins, it is the best damned aircooler on the market and a slap in the face to thermalright and their way overpriced items. I have the one with the orange fanblades. i think they call it the red scorpion but it's the same as the one pictured minus the fan.

I didn't happen to notice it being included in the heatsink reviews here either....why is that? the best one left out?

The pushpins are hard to engage, but it was done right by sitting it on a piece of foam. that is how I did it too.

Glad the system fired up! And yes, they all make a weird sound since you are literally forcing the cpu down flat against the pins. it's ok.

Enjoy!


March 4, 2008 8:22:32 PM

Sorry, but Thermalright has the best air cooling solutions out there. They are expensive for a reason.
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March 4, 2008 8:23:10 PM

Moondrinker said:


- I had a lot of trouble getting it stuck to the motherboard. I tried for 1 hour as hard as i could press down onto it. I tried so many times! I only pressed with major force onto the four black plastic clips and not the CPU cooler itself (allthough mild pressure on the CPU cooler itself might had happend doing my frustration and rage).
- Yes i admit i was frustrated and might have pressed too hard (why i'm writing this] onto the plastic clips.
- A piece of the CPU cooler fell off. Nothing serious (or is it?)
http://img131.imageshack.us/img131/5093/billede001ce2.jpg

- I finally got it down and stuck onto the surface. Everything looks perfect, it sits very tight, i can't even turn it in any way.



Always a bad idea to apply force. Should have asked us all/every question you had during the installation process itself.
March 4, 2008 8:38:16 PM

ye. . ok :(  It's just. it seemed so easy! I've seen people doing it all the time in videos and the manual described it pretty well too. But when i finally began to mount it, it was so damn difficult and tight! Really pain in the a**!!
I doubt it would have worked without force. . or well, it properly would, i do not have a lot of insight in this particularly matter.

Well, it works! :)  Now i know for my next build.
December 3, 2008 9:23:54 PM

FYI Socket 775 CPU's are incredibly durable, I don't think they can be damaged in any physical way easily due to the new pin set up. I've dropped a Q9550 from my hand to a tile floor about 3 feet down, it landed "pin" side down and slit about a foot, I picked it up and installed it, runs like a dream.
!