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CableCard

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Anonymous
June 27, 2005 12:13:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In considering the Pioneer 4350, I see (and have read about others) that
comes with a CableCard that replaces teh set-top box. Honestly, I am not
very clear on what it does and is it necessary. Is this something that my
cable company must offer to use? Mine happens to be Charter Media.

Thanks again.

More about : cablecard

Anonymous
June 27, 2005 11:37:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Felice wrote:
> In considering the Pioneer 4350, I see (and have read about others) that
> comes with a CableCard that replaces teh set-top box. Honestly, I am not
> very clear on what it does and is it necessary. Is this something that my
> cable company must offer to use? Mine happens to be Charter Media.
>
> Thanks again.
>
>
With a cable card your tv does the decoding of the digital signal
instead of the "set top box" from the cable company. You lose 2 way
(Video On Demand) and "menu" that is sorted by categories.
I have one and am very happy not to have another controller to mess with.
If you don't have one you won't receive any encrypted channels.
Tee Jay
Anonymous
June 27, 2005 11:37:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Thanks for the explanation. Since I will want to access VOD I assume that I
can just not use the CableCard and have a set-top box. True?


"Terry Joyce" <terrynospamjoyce@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:9oydndmVJd1ueSLfRVn-qQ@comcast.com...
> Felice wrote:
> > In considering the Pioneer 4350, I see (and have read about others) that
> > comes with a CableCard that replaces teh set-top box. Honestly, I am
not
> > very clear on what it does and is it necessary. Is this something that
my
> > cable company must offer to use? Mine happens to be Charter Media.
> >
> > Thanks again.
> >
> >
> With a cable card your tv does the decoding of the digital signal
> instead of the "set top box" from the cable company. You lose 2 way
> (Video On Demand) and "menu" that is sorted by categories.
> I have one and am very happy not to have another controller to mess with.
> If you don't have one you won't receive any encrypted channels.
> Tee Jay
Related resources
Anonymous
June 27, 2005 5:39:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Felice" <delcolle@charter.net> wrote in message
news:ALidnT5n4eSOZCLfRVn-qg@giganews.com...
> Thanks for the explanation. Since I will want to access VOD I assume that
> I
> can just not use the CableCard and have a set-top box. True?
>
>
Currently the CableCards are only capable of one-way communication, so video
on demand won't work with them. You will need a box from the cable company
for VOD. You can order pay per view with the card, but only by calling the
office for a CSR to enter your order in the computer and authorize the box
(or via automated phone ordering if your company is capable of it). Two way
cable cards are still expected to be a couple of years away, and will most
likely not work with the slots in current model TVs.
Anonymous
June 28, 2005 2:03:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Mike Rush wrote:
> Currently the CableCards are only capable of one-way communication...

As I understand it...

A more accurate statement is that few if any CableCARDs are being plugged
into two-way capable DTVs/STB. When inserted, a CableCARD will query a
DTV/STB for its capabilities (relates to OpenCable profiles), and today's
CableCARDs are capable of supporting DTVs/STBs that report two-way
capability. Now as many people probably know, OpenCable based two-way
DTVs/STBs are practically non-existant, and one could imagine by the time
OpenCable based two-way DTVs/STBs start to popularize, a new card
slot/connector/capability may emerge (pure speculation on both our parts).

One item that is not supported/supportable by the current crop of CableCARDs
is multiple streams, an there is work underway to create multi-stream
capable cards.

In short, CableCARD is suppose to support two-way, but for now that is an
academic fact.

--tg
Anonymous
June 28, 2005 2:03:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"news.cup.hp.com" <thomasDELME_gilgDELME@hpDELME.com> wrote in message
news:o I_ve.7713$TX3.2437@news.cpqcorp.net...
> Mike Rush wrote:
>> Currently the CableCards are only capable of one-way communication...
>
> As I understand it...
>
> A more accurate statement is that few if any CableCARDs are being plugged
> into two-way capable DTVs/STB. > In short, CableCARD is suppose to support
> two-way, but for now that is an academic fact.
>

My mistake. I assumed that since the CEA is still arguing with the NCTA (and
CableLabs?) over the interface specifications and implementation of the two
way set up, that the cards as well as the sets faced some likely changes
that would render the current wave of cards unusable with the DTV's and
STB's that eventually support two way. Last I heard, they were still
fighting over whether remote control pass-through should allow customers to
control services and features through the cable company's card. The CEA was
against allowing the cable companies having the ability to offer future
features that were not part of the TV firmware or software.
Anonymous
June 28, 2005 9:33:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Mike:
> I assumed that since the CEA is still arguing with the NCTA ...

While the current CableCARD may support two-way as defined by
CableLabs' OpenCable spec, it indeed remains to be seen if the
negotiations might break the current two-way capability in the CableCARD.

--tg
Anonymous
June 30, 2005 9:53:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Trade-offs using a CableCard include anything that you get from your cable
company by communicating with them via the remote, such as VOD. They are
only 1 way. This also makes it harder for the cable company to see on their
computers what's going on with your TV when there are problems, so they are
more likely to have to send a cable person out.

Also, you get no cable guide and no DVR box, such as the SA 8300HD, on which
you can record HDTV programs. Plus, the CableCard technology is not very
far along so, depending on your cable company, your brand of TV set and
other factors, you could have problems.

On the other hand, it is nice not to have to mess with a cable box and the
SD pictures are better, I found, via CableCard than through at least a basic
HDTV cable box. (The 8300 DVR transmits them pretty nicely, though.)

When we had a CableCard, we had a lot of dropouts, lasting from a few
seconds to forever -- until we would pull the CableCard and re-insert it --
or re-scan for all the digital channels. Big hassle and always happens in
the middle of something you want to see -- for obvious reasons.

In the end, after a trail of a couple of months, we ditched the CableCard
and went with a SA8300 DVR box. MUCH better option, IMO.

mack
austin



"Felice" <delcolle@charter.net> wrote in message
news:zs2dnWFyYO9q8yLfRVn-oA@giganews.com...
> In considering the Pioneer 4350, I see (and have read about others) that
> comes with a CableCard that replaces teh set-top box. Honestly, I am not
> very clear on what it does and is it necessary. Is this something that my
> cable company must offer to use? Mine happens to be Charter Media.
>
> Thanks again.
>
>
Anonymous
June 30, 2005 11:39:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Mack McKinnon wrote:
> Trade-offs using a CableCard include anything that you get from your cable
> company by communicating with them via the remote, such as VOD. They are
> only 1 way. This also makes it harder for the cable company to see on their
> computers what's going on with your TV when there are problems, so they are
> more likely to have to send a cable person out.
>
> Also, you get no cable guide and no DVR box, such as the SA 8300HD, on which
> you can record HDTV programs. Plus, the CableCard technology is not very
> far along so, depending on your cable company, your brand of TV set and
> other factors, you could have problems.
>
> On the other hand, it is nice not to have to mess with a cable box and the
> SD pictures are better, I found, via CableCard than through at least a basic
> HDTV cable box. (The 8300 DVR transmits them pretty nicely, though.)
>
> When we had a CableCard, we had a lot of dropouts, lasting from a few
> seconds to forever -- until we would pull the CableCard and re-insert it --
> or re-scan for all the digital channels. Big hassle and always happens in
> the middle of something you want to see -- for obvious reasons.
>
> In the end, after a trail of a couple of months, we ditched the CableCard
> and went with a SA8300 DVR box. MUCH better option, IMO.
>
> mack
> austin
>
>
>
> "Felice" <delcolle@charter.net> wrote in message
> news:zs2dnWFyYO9q8yLfRVn-oA@giganews.com...
>
>>In considering the Pioneer 4350, I see (and have read about others) that
>>comes with a CableCard that replaces teh set-top box. Honestly, I am not
>>very clear on what it does and is it necessary. Is this something that my
>>cable company must offer to use? Mine happens to be Charter Media.
>>
>>Thanks again.
>>
>>
>
>
>

I am currently troubleshooting dropouts that last several seconds at a
time, often on a one minute cycle. The cable person came out today and
of course it didn't happen so he went away without doing anything.

Only drops out on HD channels. Panasonic TH-42DX50U plasma set, on
Adelphia HD cable with their provided cablecard.

Chip Gallo
Anonymous
July 2, 2005 8:59:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Chip Gallo" <cgallo@nospamcitlink.net> wrote

> I am currently troubleshooting dropouts that last several seconds at a
> time, often on a one minute cycle. The cable person came out today and of
> course it didn't happen so he went away without doing anything.
>
> Only drops out on HD channels. Panasonic TH-42DX50U plasma set, on
> Adelphia HD cable with their provided cablecard.
>
> Chip Gallo

Well, good luck. We had dropouts from several seconds to several minutes
all the time when we were using a CableCard from TW Cable in Austin. We
had two types of dropouts, which would generally affect all the HD channels
except local stations. (1) comes back on its own and (2) requires cutting
off the TV, pulling and reseating the CableCard, turning the TV back on (or
rescanning for digital channels, which takes a lot longer).

Some problem with the interaction of the TW CableCard computers, our Sony TV
set, the Scientific Atlanta CableCard -- who the hell knows? Time-Warner
never could fix it. Eventually, we gave up and got an 8300HD DVR box. MUCH
better!

I think we have to wait for 2-way CableCards. Then, when they can sell VOD
etc. via CableCard, the cable companies will get a LOT more interested in
making them work right.

mack
austin
!