Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Fridge as a chassis cooling system

Last response: in Components
Share
March 4, 2008 10:21:47 AM

Hello again!

I had an idea on using a fridge as a case. I think it's a great idea, since it produce alot of icecold air around the components. Now, my idea was to cut out the side on the chassis, where you put the components on. And put it in the fridge/freezer. And maybe cut some holes in the front, and put some fans that can push out the air. And the fridge push cold air in. But I was thinking, does it get muggy in there? If so, isn't that dangerous for my hardware?
(Edit: A colleague at my work, said that it won't get muggy inside the fridge, if I keep it closed all the time. If I open the door, it'd can get muggy).
If not, I was thinking of setting a watercooling in the fridge where the freezer itself is. So it gets extra cold, and will cool down my components even more.
The noise? Yeah, it'll be really noisy, but I don't care 'bout that. Even though I'll set some Nexus DampTek Noise Absorption Material around the freezer/fridge inside (maybe outside too? If that helps).

Noise Reduction:
- DynaMat
DynaMat is actually for cars. But in great use for this too. Reduce vibration and noise.
Price: 67$
- DampTek
This will reduce noise.
Price: 67$

I will cover the walls inside with these materials. Maybe on the outside too?

Fans:
- Akasa Crystal 80mm LED Fan
Fan speed: 2500 RPM
Airflow: 28.76 CFM
Noiselevel: 27.45 dBA
Price: 19$
- Akasa 120mm LED Fan
Fan speed: 1700 RPM
Airflow: 59.05 CFM
Noiselevel: 29.75 dBA
Price: 25$
- Delta 120mm EFB1212SHE
Fan speed: 3700 RPM
Airflow: 141.96 CFM
Noiselevel: 52.5 dBA
Price: 17$

I'm not using the fans for cooling, but to move the air around in the chassis. I'll be using between 7 to 10 fans for optimal airflow around the chassis. And some extra cooling?
Well, I'll put some fans on the heatsink though, for extra cooling.
My colleague said that I won't be needing to cut holes in the frontdoor and put some fans there to push the air out. The fridge itself will do the job.

The heatsink system:
Motherboard: Thermalright HR-05/IFX
http://www.thermalright.com/new_a_page/product_page/chipset/hr05_ifx/product_chitset_cooler_hr05_ifx.htm
CPU: Thermalright Ultra-120 Extreme
http://www.thermalright.com/new_a_page/product_page/cpu/u120ex/product_cpu_cooler_u120ex.htm?art=MTQyMywxLCxoZW50aHVzaWFzdA==
VGA: Thermalright HR-03 GT
http://www.thermalright.com/new_a_page/product_page/vga/hr03gt/product_vga_cooler_hr03gt.htm?art=MTQyMywxLCxoZW50aHVzaWFzdA==
RAM: Thermalright HR-07 Duo
http://www.thermalright.com/new_a_page/product_page/ram/hr07duo/product_ram_cooler_hr07duo.htm?art=MTQyMywxLCxoZW50aHVzaWFzdA==
MOSFET: Thermalright HR-09 S/U (type 1)
http://www.thermalright.com/new_a_page/product_page/mosfet/product_mosfet_cooler_hr09.htm?art=MTQyMywxLCxoZW50aHVzaWFzdA==
I don't know if I'll be using only heatsinks, or a combo of watercooling and heatsinks. Maybe you guys got experience enough to tell me what would be best to use. My opinion is to use heatsink only. Since the cold air that flows around will cool down the heatsink even more. But when I'm thinking of to connecting the watercooler to the freezer, I'm thinking that would be even more efficient.
Price: 256$ (All heatsinks)
Price: 117$ (MOS, RAM & MB)

The watercooling system:
- Swiftech H20-220 Ultra + Water Cooling Kit http://www.xoxide.com/swiftech-h2o-apex-ultra-plus.html
If I'm gonna use the watercooling. Then it'll only cool down the CPU, VGA and maybe the MB? And use heatsinks on the rest. But I was thinking, maybe I can make the fridge itself cool down the watercooler, so I get icecold water and air!
Price: 288$ (CPU & VGA Only)

Chassis:

Name: In-Win EAR-010
HxWxD: 415 x 190 x 445 mm
Case size: Mid Tower Chassis
Price: 58$

Fridge:

Name: Samsung SR-G118
HxWxD: 836 x 453 x 495 mm
Weight: 25 Kg
Energyclass: Class B
Noise: 36 dBA
Price: 289$

Freezer:

Name: Elto F11
HxWxD: 850 x 550 x 600 mm
Weight: 45 Kg
Energyclass: Class A
Noise: 45 dBA
Price: 386$

Fridge & Heatsink; Total price: 798$
Fridge, Watercooling & Heatsink; Total price: 947$

Freezer & Heatsink; Total price: 895$
Freezer, Watercooling & Heatsink; Total price: 1044$

Yes, it is expensive, but is it efficient? And if it is efficient, is it efficient enough to be worth the money?
We'll see when I've built it up. Just need to order the products first.
Still, I'm wondering if I should go for Fridge & Heatsink, Fridge, Watercooling & Heatsink, Freezer & Heatsink or Freezer, Watercooling & Heatsink?

So what do you guys think about this solution for chassis cooling?

Kind regards,
Nymph.
March 4, 2008 10:26:48 AM

Expensive and incredibly inefficient.
A better idea for the cost would be phase-change cooling.
In a fridge you'd have massive condensation problems, you would need something to keep the humidity low, otherwise you woudl ruin your components.
March 4, 2008 10:35:29 AM

LukeBird said:
Expensive and incredibly inefficient.
A better idea for the cost would be phase-change cooling.
In a fridge you'd have massive condensation problems, you would need something to keep the humidity low, otherwise you woudl ruin your components.


That's what I also thought, but my colleague told me that the humidity will be low, if I just keep the door closed. And I don't need the door open, only when I'm gonna change parts or so, but I'll just shut everything down before opening the door.
But I'm gonna test this chassis solution on some crappy old parts, and see how it'll work out.

But inefficient? I don't think so, since you can control the temperature on the fridge. I was thinking something around 5-10 celcius, and have 7-10 fans to move the cold air around. Plus, I'll be using heatsink and/or watercooling.
So, I think this will be very efficient! But we'll see.

Kind regards,
Nymph.
Related resources
March 4, 2008 10:45:41 AM

I think you really would be better off with phase-change cooling. That's what I'm using on a couple of FX-74's and it works brilliantly. Cost a whole heck of a lot less than your proposed system and I don't need to worry at all about condensation. That's going to be your biggest problem. Just keeping the door shut won't help as fridges aren't completely air-tight. Think about it, if they were air-tight you wouldn't be able to open the door easily when the outside air-pressure rises....
March 4, 2008 10:46:56 AM

I think a fridge computer would be fantastic!
Ryan
March 4, 2008 10:51:05 AM

...Or maybe the world first quad core freezer??
March 4, 2008 10:57:27 AM

Not a good idea.

Quote:

The fridge can't remove enough heat per unit time to keep up with the computer's heat output. Since the fridge itself is a big insulated box, it means that putting a computer in a fridge will accelerate heating rather than reduce it.


http://totaldrek.blogspot.com/2005/09/return-of-icebox.html
March 4, 2008 11:01:06 AM

Actually, thinking about it... why not just hermetically seal the whole room and mount the fridge/freezer - minus door - in a whole in the wall. Instant cooling for all electronic cooling in the room :) 

If you want a really cheap cooling solution try Tom's oil cooled PC. Watertight your case, take off all the fans and fill it up with cooking oil. Works a treat apparently.
March 4, 2008 11:12:53 AM

Wouldn't that write off the guarantees on ALL the parts though?
RyaN
March 4, 2008 11:14:23 AM

tstebbens said:
I think you really would be better off with phase-change cooling. That's what I'm using on a couple of FX-74's and it works brilliantly. Cost a whole heck of a lot less than your proposed system and I don't need to worry at all about condensation. That's going to be your biggest problem. Just keeping the door shut won't help as fridges aren't completely air-tight. Think about it, if they were air-tight you wouldn't be able to open the door easily when the outside air-pressure rises....


You've gotta point there. But I'm sure it really is air-thight, since it got a very thick rubber lining around the door that keeps the air out. I guess? Or that's what I've been told.

Kind regards,
Nymph.
a b ) Power supply
March 4, 2008 11:15:47 AM

This wouldn't work in the long run I fear, the heat your computer would generate would heat up such a small area incredibly quickly in comparison to the cooling action of the fridge itself.
March 4, 2008 11:17:22 AM

tonyp12 said:
Not a good idea.

Quote:

The fridge can't remove enough heat per unit time to keep up with the computer's heat output. Since the fridge itself is a big insulated box, it means that putting a computer in a fridge will accelerate heating rather than reduce it.


http://totaldrek.blogspot.com/2005/09/return-of-icebox.html


First off, he didn't have any airflow at all. Secondly, you can turn up or down the temperature, wich I will have at 5-10 celcius. I'm almost sure that this will work. But we'll see when I've rigged it up.

Kind regards,
Nymph.
March 4, 2008 11:19:26 AM

mi1ez said:
This wouldn't work in the long run I fear, the heat your computer would generate would heat up such a small area incredibly quickly in comparison to the cooling action of the fridge itself.


Well, I'll turn the temperature at 5-10 celcius, with 7-10 fans moving the icecold air around the case. And having heatsinks or/and watercooling. I'm almost sure that this will work. But we'll see.

Kind regards,
Nymph.
March 4, 2008 11:24:13 AM

How air-tight it is or isn't depends on the fridge, surely? (where are fridge experts when you need one??) Trouble is you need contact cooling, rather than convection cooling, on the hot parts. It would be better to use the fridge to cool say 20 litres of water and run the water through a water cooled system.
Ryan
March 4, 2008 11:24:39 AM

tstebbens said:
Actually, thinking about it... why not just hermetically seal the whole room and mount the fridge/freezer - minus door - in a whole in the wall. Instant cooling for all electronic cooling in the room :) 

If you want a really cheap cooling solution try Tom's oil cooled PC. Watertight your case, take off all the fans and fill it up with cooking oil. Works a treat apparently.


But if I sealed the whole case, how I'm supposed to get to my components? :p 

Well, I'm not actually looking for a cheap cooling solution. BUT! If everything goes to hell, I still got the heatsinks and/or the watercooler. Then I'll just throw the fridge away, and use a normal chassis, wich will be Cooler Master Cosmos Silver.

Kind regards,
Nymph.
March 4, 2008 11:26:57 AM

Ironnads said:
How air-tight it is or isn't depends on the fridge, surely? (where are fridge experts when you need one??) Trouble is you need contact cooling, rather than convection cooling, on the hot parts. It would be better to use the fridge to cool say 20 litres of water and run the water through a water cooled system.
Ryan


Indeed, and I guess these ones is. But not completely sure.

Yeah, that's what I've wrote.
xzec said:
But I was thinking, maybe I can make the fridge itself cool down the watercooler, so I get icecold water and air!

If I'm gonna use a watercooler, I will try to get the fridge to cool down the water.

Kind regards,
Nymph.
March 4, 2008 11:33:18 AM

Interesting idea. Don't think it can work though for reasons already mentioned.
a b ) Power supply
March 4, 2008 11:35:06 AM

xzec said:
Well, I'll turn the temperature at 5-10 celcius, with 7-10 fans moving the icecold air around the case. And having heatsinks or/and watercooling. I'm almost sure that this will work. But we'll see.


I'm pretty sure most any fridge won't be efficient enough to lose all the heat a pc generates.

Give it a try and let us know how it goes.
March 4, 2008 11:42:37 AM

Ironnads said:
How air-tight it is or isn't depends on the fridge, surely? (where are fridge experts when you need one??) Trouble is you need contact cooling, rather than convection cooling, on the hot parts. It would be better to use the fridge to cool say 20 litres of water and run the water through a water cooled system.
Ryan


Found out that the freezer and the fridge is completely air-thight. But as soon as I open the door, it'll be high humidity. That's why I shut everything down, before opening the door, by then nothing will get harmed.

Kind regards,
Nymph.
March 4, 2008 11:45:40 AM

mi1ez said:
I'm pretty sure most any fridge won't be efficient enough to lose all the heat a pc generates.

Give it a try and let us know how it goes.


I don't either think that any fridge will be efficient enough, if you don't modify it. If I make the freezer inside the fridge push out more air and make it colder. And having fans moving the air around to the important areas, also having heatsinks (with fans onto 'em) and/or watercooling. This will really work ...or I can't say for sure, that's why I'll say: "We'll see".

Kind regards,
Nymph.
March 4, 2008 11:47:47 AM

deuce271 said:
Interesting idea. Don't think it can work though for reasons already mentioned.


I myself, is also worried that it might won't work, but I got a good feeling that it will. But as stated before; we'll see.

Kind regards,
Nymph.
March 4, 2008 11:52:29 AM

I had this idea about two years ago. But I dropped it because of :

1. Powerfull pc produces more heat than cheap average small/medium sized fridge, that You would like to use, can take away. Not even talking about overclocking which is probably reason why You want to put it in a fridge.
2. HDD and CD/DVD drive would need to be mounted outside of fridge.
3. Taking too much space.

Modern powerfull PC's produce more heat than my average system 2 years ago so You will need even more powerfull cooling.

If You are going this way I would suggest to use powerfull (industrial) fridge or even better freezer. Keep moving parts like CD/DVD drive and HDD out of it. I would not worry to much about condensation as it will happen on the coldest part - evaporator of the fridge/freezer. If You want to be 100% sure You can spray Your system with silicon spray that is used for car ignition systems to keep moisture away.

If You want to know what I did:
1. 320W Peltier cooling for cpu and Peltier element cooled by water.
2. Video card cooled by the same watercooling system that was cooling Peltier.

My old Athlon XP 3200+ (2.2GHz) was running stable at 2.8GHz at 7-10 degrees Celsium on full load.

Anyway if You want best results use phase coolig system but You may need more than one. One for cpu and separate for VGA, don't forget chipsets as well.

March 4, 2008 12:22:41 PM

Let's take a look at it under the assumption that fridge is highly power efficient and that all computer components turn their electrical energy into heat (1:1).

The Elto F11 has a power consumption of 0,4 kw per day (Elto F11).
Under the assumption that the heatpump used within that fridge is very advanced, it may have a coefficient of performance (COP) of 5. Multiplying the Wattage with the Coefficient results in a daily cooling power of 2000 Watts or 2 kw.

A processor like the core 2 duo e6400 (Intel Thermal Specifications) with a TDP of 65 watt (the processor actually produces less than 50 Watt, let us stick to intels specs though) produces, under full load, a daily heat of 65*24=1560 Watt.

The Elto F11 would be sufficient to cool an operating intel dual core processor.


Since you can not physically separate the processor from the mainboard, the mainboard chipsets will need cooling too. Given that the mainboard will have a graphics adapater, as well as other things, the cooling requirements rise.

Taking an average system (THG Test) like the Intel System THG tested, you will end up with 87 Watts with all components idling. That is 87*24=2088 Watts. Since not all power drawn from the socket is turned into heat, it should work - theoretically. Bad insulation etc. will make this a pretty close call already. Once you start using the system and the power consumption rises to 163,5, which turns to ~4kw of heat per day. Twice the amount the Elto F11 can handle under perfect working conditions.

Since you want to cool your components in a more extreme way, i assume you are not running an ordinary office pc. A quad core with a GTX or two will produce enough heat to turn your fridge, thanks to it's insulation, into a perfectly capable oven. I suggest using a nail gun to secure your electrical fuse, fire up 3dmark 06 and set a stop watch to roughly 15 minutes. Don't let the smell of burnt plastic, thre cracking sound of fire or the toxic fumes deter you from your mission.

Fun aside, if you really want to make this work, i would suggest using water cooling. Put the radiator outside of the case and run a loop on GPU, CPU and chipset. Generally the cooling of a fridge is not strong enough to handle all your components. The insulation is not necessary an advantage and the size isn't quite the benefit either. The idea is nice, but a few fans and a decent water cooler will work better.



March 4, 2008 12:26:25 PM

This has to be the dumbest idea i have ever seen on toms forums.
March 4, 2008 12:28:21 PM

ainarssems said:
I had this idea about two years ago. But I dropped it because of :

1. Powerfull pc produces more heat than cheap average small/medium sized fridge, that You would like to use, can take away. Not even talking about overclocking which is probably reason why You want to put it in a fridge.
2. HDD and CD/DVD drive would need to be mounted outside of fridge.
3. Taking too much space.

Modern powerfull PC's produce more heat than my average system 2 years ago so You will need even more powerfull cooling.

If You are going this way I would suggest to use powerfull (industrial) fridge or even better freezer. Keep moving parts like CD/DVD drive and HDD out of it. I would not worry to much about condensation as it will happen on the coldest part - evaporator of the fridge/freezer. If You want to be 100% sure You can spray Your system with silicon spray that is used for car ignition systems to keep moisture away.

If You want to know what I did:
1. 320W Peltier cooling for cpu and Peltier element cooled by water.
2. Video card cooled by the same watercooling system that was cooling Peltier.

My old Athlon XP 3200+ (2.2GHz) was running stable at 2.8GHz at 7-10 degrees Celsium on full load.

Anyway if You want best results use phase coolig system but You may need more than one. One for cpu and separate for VGA, don't forget chipsets as well.


It's like no-one reads my thread and just post what they think about my cooling solution.
Okay, listen, I'm going to use a freezer or a fridge, and I will also use fans to move the icecold air to the important areas. Also I will use heatsinks and/or a watercooler. Wich the watercooler will go through the freezer itself (if possible).
Plus, I will lower the temperature to 5-10 celcius and make the freezer pump out more air. But if I'm gonna use a freezer, the temperature will be at 10 minus, wich can't be good, when the computer are on idle. Wich will make all the components to ice. But setting the freezer up to 1-5 celcius will make it totally safe.

But I was wondering, why do I need to have the HDDs outside? I do understand with the CD/DVD drivers, since I can't open the fridge when the computer is on. But that's no problem, I'll just have the CD/DVD drivers outside and make a room where the CD/DVD drivers will be onto. But taking space is no problem for me, I've got plenty of space. But when it comes to LANing, it would be another problem. But I guess I'll figure that out, when that time comes.

Silicon spray? On my components? ...Is that safe? Won't it be like throwing water on my components?
And what will it help for?

Kind regards,
Nymph.
March 4, 2008 12:36:18 PM

uk_gangsta said:
This has to be the dumbest idea i have ever seen on toms forums.


First off, have you even read my thread? Secondley, if you have. Then you're just a smartass who have no plain idea on how this works and just go for: "Gee, what a dumb idea, but still I don't know **** of what I'm talking about...".
March 4, 2008 12:38:05 PM

I don't think it's a good idea, but I REALLY want you to try it... just use a junk system you can live without and send us pictures and tell us how it goes.
March 4, 2008 12:40:18 PM

Slobogob said:
Fun aside, if you really want to make this work, i would suggest using water cooling. Put the radiator outside of the case and run a loop on GPU, CPU and chipset. Generally the cooling of a fridge is not strong enough to handle all your components. The insulation is not necessary an advantage and the size isn't quite the benefit either. The idea is nice, but a few fans and a decent water cooler will work better.


Yeah, I am going to use, either heatsink only or heatsink and watercooling. But I am going to try to make the freezer in the fridge pump out more air and lower the temperature to 5-10 celcius. Or if it's a freezer, I have to take the temperature higher, to 1-5 celcius. Plus having fans moving the icecold air around to the important areas.

Kind regards,
Nymph.
March 4, 2008 12:42:29 PM

rodney_ws said:
I don't think it's a good idea, but I REALLY want you to try it... just use a junk system you can live without and send us pictures and tell us how it goes.


Yeap, my testbed will be a really crappy computer. And I'll post pictures and write detailed on how I did it.

Kind regards,
Nymph.
March 4, 2008 12:50:49 PM

Put some dry ice into the mix while your at it. That way when you do finally open the door you'll get a really cool stage effect of 'white smoke', and maybe a little contact buzz as well.

Lan via the same sealed external connects you put the dvd through, or just wireless through the walls of the box via usb. Course, you might have to mount the access point on the freezer itself to see it over the e-noise caused by the freezer motors power draw and operation.

March 4, 2008 12:58:44 PM

I'd love to see this!
You would want to keep the HD's out of a fridge, because they would be effected by the cooling.
You would get water condensing onto the platter which would damage it when it spins up.
Can't wait to see the pictures! :D 
March 4, 2008 12:59:36 PM

Gentlemen and Ladies,
there are tons of people who have came up with the same idea. Some people have already mentioned that. A fridge or a freezer is only meant to keep already cool air cool. That's why there's insulation on the fridge/freezer. Having a computer in the f/f would make the compressor run non stop due to the heat being produced by the computer.

If you'd like to test how long a compressor will run non stop, open your refrigerator door at night and see if it's still running in the morning.

Good idea in theory though =o)
Cheers!
a c 121 ) Power supply
March 4, 2008 1:02:48 PM

I know a guy who did this in college. He cut holes in a small fridge for the power, keyboard, and monitor cables. The system would not work reliably outside the fridge, but inside it worked fine.
The catch? Well, if you notice I didn't mention a mouse cable. That's because this system was an IBM XT back in the days of DOS. They produced miniscule amounts of heat. All he probably needed was a CPU cooler, which PCs didn't even have back then.
While I could see running a watercooling loop into a fridge, it seems today this method just isn't the best way.
March 4, 2008 1:03:09 PM

We sell some commercial refrigeration products, ref/freezers, walk in cooler/freezers, and ice machines, and one thing we do for water cooled ice machines in hotter climates is to run a copper loop through a walk in cooler to help drop the water temps.

However, 2 things are going to kill your box.

1. Moisture. WAY too much moisture inside the freezer or cooler for your components to handle. Just a smidge of condensation and bye bye cpu!

Anything below ambient temps are going to cause problems in the long run due to condensation.

2. Domestic refrigeration units typically have passive cooling vs forced air cooling on commercial units. They are made to keep cold stuff cold, not reduce temps or freeze unfrozen stuff. Yes, you can make popsicles in your home freezer, but it takes a long time to remove heat from a "cooked" product, be it a cpu at 65c, or soup at 65c.

It requires a much larger compressor, say 1/3 hp or better to really remove heat at a fast pace, vs a fractional 1/12 hp on the units you were referring to.

A standard 100 watt light bulb produces more heat than the dorm fridge you were talking about can remove. Test it by running the cord through the sidewall and leave the bulb on for 3 hours. I will guarantee you over 75c by then.

Having said all this, I am eager to hear your results, but as Rodney said, use junk stuff first....
a c 121 ) Power supply
March 4, 2008 1:05:16 PM

Howard_Stern said:
If you'd like to test how long a compressor will run non stop, open your refrigerator door at night and see if it's still running in the morning.





Now THAT was funny...


(and the thought that there are probably some drones who will try this)
March 4, 2008 1:12:00 PM

This is a monumentally stupid idea. Take pictures; I like to see blue smoke and maybe even a house fire.
March 4, 2008 1:16:09 PM

Tried to find the thread I did about 5 or 6 years ago on the same subject on another site, guess it's gone now. What I used was a small chest freezer. Tried 2 variations. First I put the system in the freezer, then I did watercooling with the system outside. What I found:
1. My power bill did go up by about 8$ a month.
2. With the system inside and keeping the door closed, condensation was not an issue as most new refer/freezers are frost free. To do this they dry the air through some process. As long as you keep the door closed should not be an issue. You have to seal around any holes made in the fridge case.
3. Need a decent fan inside the refer to move the air around, I used a 120 at full speed, can't hear it.
4. Best and consistent cooling came from water. What I did here was to first use a large container as a tank, about 10 gallons inside the freezer. I also tried 50' of hose looping around inside. Both worked well enough, with the 10 gal system a few degrees cooler.
5. Be careful putting holes in the fridge. Some models incorporate the heat removing components of the refer system itself into the case. Puncture the gas line and you have problems.
Over all, it was fun, and not that expensive to do for me as I got the freezer at a garage sale for 50$. Did do decent cooling, but I did have to adjust the freezer temp to prevent condensation when on water. Would I do it again? No. Not worth the hassle for the benefits. My Coolit Freezone does a great job, and with decent air cooling on my mobo components I get 90% of the oc ability at 2% of the effort.
March 4, 2008 1:25:53 PM

The thing is that normal household fridge/freezer can ger rid of 180-250W of heat per hour and overclocked cpu alone will produce 150W + for a full system I would say at least 300W. That means that if you have freezer running with pc off and keep it at -20 celsius and then switch pc on it will slowly heat up your freezer and You will be running at +20 and rising after half hour. Because pc will produce more heat than freezer can get rid off.
If You want this to work You will need high power freezer like ones used in supermarkets or industrial freezer.

As for putting temperature higher if using freezer I would not worry about that. Just put it to coldest setting. Because You would like to keep it as cool as possible. Guys running extreme overclocking cool cpu below -100 celsius using liquid nitrogen.

About HDD. Due to them working below specified operational temperatures and the fact that they are built from different materials and different materials have different expansion due to temperature You never know what ill will do when cooled too much. It might seize up or heads can touch disc too hard or may move away from disc. You can try them in a freezer but I would put them outside, that will also save some heat from freezer. And having HDD colled will not give You any benefits.

On the other thought I would also keep power supply outside to save some heat from beeing released in to the freezer.

About silicon spray. It is used on car ignition systems to keep water away to prevent short circuits and corosion. Thre are voltages above 20 000V and it keeps it safe. In pc however highest voltage 12V(not including psu) and even water could not cause enough short circuit to do permanent damage. Use of silicon spray wiil prevent of water condensate reaching conductive parts and keep it safe from short circuits and corosion if condensation were to happen. But please note that there are many kinds of silicon and its sprays where some may be highly conductive and others very good insulators. I am talking about the one that is used for car ignition sytems to keep moisture away and that is a very good insulator.
March 4, 2008 1:30:51 PM

Because you've already made it clear that even though you're asking for opinions, you refuse to accept negative ones, I'll save my effort and make this quick:

You're not the smartest person in the world. Therefore, your ideas are not new, unique or special. If they're not new, unique or special, why are they not being used already? There must be a reason this is not the standard practice of every overclocker and enthusiast.
March 4, 2008 1:46:25 PM

A refrigerator does not "make things cold". Rather it draws the heat out and insulates from any more heating coming in resulting in a cold environment. Standard home fridges are only capable of extracting a limited amount of heat. If you put a cup of boiling water in a fridge it has a finite amount of heat which over time the fridge will extract and eventually the water will be cold. Once it's cooled the water will stay cold because the fridge is insulated. But it takes a lot of energy just to remove a small amount of heat. With a computer you do not have a finite amount of heat because as it runs it's constantly generating heat; way more heat than a standard refrigerator can remove. Then what makes it even worse is that the insulation starts to work against drawing heat out by trapping it in. This will happen very rapidly. So what you'll have in just a few minutes of running a PC in a fridge is a nice oven.
March 4, 2008 1:48:08 PM

I had the same thoughts about a wine cooler a number of months ago
March 4, 2008 1:59:01 PM

I just want to add to the OP who seems insistent on trying this. IT WILL NOT WORK! You might as well try digging to China or jump off your roof while flapping your arms to fly. It's a simple matter of physics. Have you actually stopped to think about how many watts of heat a PC (or even just a CPU) will generate compared to how much the refrigerators you're looking at can actually remove?
a b ) Power supply
March 4, 2008 2:05:52 PM

I'm glad people agreed with me eventually...
March 4, 2008 2:24:21 PM

Well, the question I have that nobody has asked is, "why?" All this effort for what? Since the OP won't listen to people giving him explanations as to why the physics just don't work, I have a solution that will work even better than this proposed refrigerator idea.

Better than oil, just take out your fans and fill your whole case with peanut butter and top it off with some jelly.

Or, better yet, take out the fans and fill your whole case with cement. This prevents any future upgrading and makes it heavy as hell, but it should keep it quite cool. As long as you bury it 60 feet underground and run cables up to your desk.

March 4, 2008 2:54:04 PM

YES. YES, it will WORK. just go ahead. do it. then sent us pics. i would love to share them with the world.

P.S run prime95 for 12 hrs. n tell us ur load temp. . . . . . . . if u ever get it to work for 12 hrs. LOL
March 4, 2008 3:03:43 PM

Slobogob said:


Since you want to cool your components in a more extreme way, i assume you are not running an ordinary office pc. A quad core with a GTX or two will produce enough heat to turn your fridge, thanks to it's insulation, into a perfectly capable oven. I suggest using a nail gun to secure your electrical fuse, fire up 3dmark 06 and set a stop watch to roughly 15 minutes. Don't let the smell of burnt plastic, thre cracking sound of fire or the toxic fumes deter you from your mission.


I was laughing so hard at that part. I think it was a novel idea it just won't work that's all. Hell even I have been guilty of thinking this up. I was in an overclocking contest not to long ago and used air and was able to get 4.15 Ghz out of my system taking second place until the last minute when every jumped in with their $1100 Q9650s and smacked me down to 7th. I actually took advantage of mother nature for this task though and stuck my $h!7 out side in the freezing 10 degree wheather. It worked rather well though as I was beating people with water cooling.

Any way aren't peltiers expensive?
March 4, 2008 4:26:58 PM

scj said:
You're not the smartest person in the world. Therefore, your ideas are not new, unique or special. If they're not new, unique or special, why are they not being used already? There must be a reason this is not the standard practice of every overclocker and enthusiast.


Internally, I go through a thought pattern like that any time I have a good idea... and then I re-think my idea eventually spot the absurdity/flaw in it. However, in this case... I think the OP just wants to do something fun... I don't see the harm in it. It's not like he's recommending we all go out and do it. I'd really like to see pics and know how long it took before something went wrong... horribly wrong.
March 4, 2008 5:23:38 PM

People, people! Christ, I haven't said that this will work. I said I think this will work, and we'll see. I'm open to every theory, and what most of you said about that the fridge won't be able to cool down the computer, and not even the CPU.
I believe it's true, since the fridge is all sealed up, and after a while, the components will burn out. But I was thinking of something to push out the old air, without any air coming in (so there always will be low humidity). So that the fridge will never heat up. Since it'll be just as a normal chassis, only that this will have a freezer inside it.
Anyways, it's only crap that'll be damaged. Someone told me that I should try to have the fridge open all night, and see what would happen. Well? I've many times forgotten to close the fridge, and nothing have happened. But having the fridge open for a certain time, will damage the fridge.
By the way, I'm not saying this idea is unique, special, new or anything like that! Why do you all have to flame me for coming up with an idea for my chassis? I mean, I've never said that I'm the first who's gonna do this or anything like that. Seriously.
But thanks for your thoughts, and we'll see how it'll work out.

Kind regards,
Nymph.
March 4, 2008 5:40:28 PM

xzec said:
People, people! Christ, I haven't said that this will work. I said I think this will work, and we'll see. I'm open to every theory, and what most of you said about that the fridge won't be able to cool down the computer, and not even the CPU.
I believe it's true, since the fridge is all sealed up, and after a while, the components will burn out. But I was thinking of something to push out the old air, without any air coming in (so there always will be low humidity). So that the fridge will never heat up. Since it'll be just as a normal chassis, only that this will have a freezer inside it.
Anyways, it's only crap that'll be damaged. Someone told me that I should try to have the fridge open all night, and see what would happen. Well? I've many times forgotten to close the fridge, and nothing have happened. But having the fridge open for a certain time, will damage the fridge.
By the way, I'm not saying this idea is unique, special, new or anything like that! Why do you all have to flame me for coming up with an idea for my chassis? I mean, I've never said that I'm the first who's gonna do this or anything like that. Seriously.
But thanks for your thoughts, and we'll see how it'll work out.

Kind regards,
Nymph.

but you throw a fit every time someone comes up with a reason it wont work. either go ahead and do it for **** and giggles or realize it wont work and dont do it. dont keep defending it like a child insisting that "my dad can beat up your dad!"
!