Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Cheap PSU vs. Expensive PSU?

Last response: in Components
Share
March 9, 2008 4:30:45 AM

I'm going to get a new rig soon and the total parts will eventually add up to the following:
Intel Core 2 Duo e8400
4GB DDR2-800 (4 sticks total)
NVIDIA GeForce 8800GTS 512MB
160GB SATA2 + 120GB IDE HDDs
2x 120MM fans + 1x 140MM fan.
1 Lightscribe DVD+/-RAM drive.
No overclocking, and on a medium end, standard Gigabyte board (nothing special)

What would be the benefit of getting this PSU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Instead of this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
The price difference is not a small one. Why would I pay $40+ extra the Corsair PSU that I saw recommended several times by different people in another thread? I don't like wasting cash. Thanks for any answers.

March 9, 2008 5:02:48 AM

IMO, it's all about the quality of the components used. More expensive units from reputable companies tend to use higher quality components that are usually less likely to fail. Cheap PSUs have a nasty reputation of taking other components with them when they fail. Personally, I would rather get a quality unit to protect the 1k+ system that I just built.
March 9, 2008 5:20:08 AM

First off, you get what you pay for

From what I've heard and experienced, Rosewill PSU's are kind of hit and miss. I have friends who have had Rosewill PSU's in their computers and nearly all of them have failed due to a faulty capacitor or two. One time, one of my friends had just turned his PC on and I saw smoke coming out the back of his Rosewill PSU. After we unplugged it and let it cool down, we took it out, opened it up, and most of the inside was charred. I put in a spare I had lying at home to test everything and thankfully, his PC booted up and ran just fine. The next day, he went out and bought a well known PSU brand. (It was either Antec or Thermaltake, don't remember) He has had no problems with it ever since.

I haven't heard anything but great things about Corsair PSU's. I'm not saying that a Rosewill PSU will blow up on you, but if it does, you will wish you had spent that extra $40
Related resources
March 9, 2008 5:27:40 AM

DUDE!!!!! i just had that psu, fried my mobo!!!!!, maybe i just got bad psu, it worked for 2months,
March 9, 2008 5:27:41 AM

Rosewill is considered a rather sketchy PSU brand. Apparently, they may have a few decent models, but most are considered low quality. I think popular consensus here is, as lostandwandering said, it's worth the extra money to ensure a quality, reliable PSU.

Think of it as building a custom, expensive and high performance hot-rod car. Would you put a cheap, low-grade and unreliable fuel injector in it?
March 9, 2008 5:58:06 AM

A good PSU will stay cool, supply your comp with power properly and not die and take your MoBo, GPU and HDDs with it. With MoBos and PSUs you get what you pay for more then any other components. These pieces can take others with them if they die so spending a little more money is always worth it. My PSU is beautiful and she cost $219, but it never gets hot and i have never had a power problem. Unlike my last PSU that was noisy hot and unreliable.
Also OP you should get 2x2gigs sticks of RAM if your buying all 4 gigs at once...more stable usually, plus you could get 8 down the road if you ever need to.
a c 83 ) Power supply
March 9, 2008 6:03:46 AM

Whats wrong with the cheap ones? Something like this is much more likely to happen.

http://enthusiast.hardocp.com/article.html?art=MTM5Nywx...

Quote:
Immediately upon finishing Test #3 I noticed a very strong hot plastic/burning smell that had been slowly building through testing, but since the unit was still running I continued on and turned the power supply on for Test #4. Upon doing so I was immediately surprised by what sounded like a couple of Black Cat firecrackers going off inside our test incubator...The loud firecracker sound was a pair of the cheap Asia-X capacitors on the secondary side literally exploding off the PCB, burning a hole in the acetate shield, and generally pinballing around the interior of the power supply housing.


Cheap PSUs have cheap components inside of them, and when they die, it can do a lot of damage. I LOVE reading articles where the cheap PSUs are put through the paces. They tend to die in fiery deaths.

By the way, here is a review of the RP500, should be similar to the RP550 you inquired about.

http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=...
March 9, 2008 6:06:06 AM

doomsdaydave11 said:
I'm going to get a new rig soon and the total parts will eventually add up to the following:
Intel Core 2 Duo e8400
4GB DDR2-800 (4 sticks total)
NVIDIA GeForce 8800GTS 512MB
160GB SATA2 + 120GB IDE HDDs
2x 120MM fans + 1x 140MM fan.
1 Lightscribe DVD+/-RAM drive.
No overclocking, and on a medium end, standard Gigabyte board (nothing special)

What would be the benefit of getting this PSU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Instead of this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
The price difference is not a small one. Why would I pay $40+ extra the Corsair PSU that I saw recommended several times by different people in another thread? I don't like wasting cash. Thanks for any answers.


www.jonnyguru.com

If you are too lazy to do your own research, then please don't come back here when your system fries asking for advice. Harsh? Yep.

I assume that you already own the HDD's listed...
March 9, 2008 6:22:52 AM

croc said:
www.jonnyguru.com

If you are too lazy to do your own research, then please don't come back here when your system fries asking for advice. Harsh? Yep.

I assume that you already own the HDD's listed...

To cynical people such as yourself...
I have been doing my own research for the last couple of weeks. I've been on gamer sites, hardware sites, etc. looking for reviews on the units I posted, and finding reasons why it makes a difference. Hell, I've even been on that site and looked around.
So thank you for bashing me for my laziness, but I did do my research, and you wasted 10 seconds of typing.
March 9, 2008 6:30:21 AM

Also, I've looked around at power supply calculators all over the place and they all tell me different numbers for that system, ranging from 250-watts to 600-watts. I would like to know if a 450-watt model of the same type (Corsair 450VX) would be enough. I want it to be plenty for future upgrades for the next 3-5 years. Many of you probably have more experience in this topic then I do, and I don't want to make any more wrong decisions.
March 9, 2008 6:50:53 AM

doomsdaydave11 said:
To cynical people such as yourself...
I have been doing my own research for the last couple of weeks. I've been on gamer sites, hardware sites, etc. looking for reviews on the units I posted, and finding reasons why it makes a difference. Hell, I've even been on that site and looked around.
So thank you for bashing me for my laziness, but I did do my research, and you wasted 10 seconds of typing.


If you'd actually done the research that you claimed, then you'd know that Rosewill is a tier 5 PSU at best. From memory, one of their PSU's self-destructed in Jonny's lab with rather interesting results, such as smoke, flame, small explosions...

But, hey its your PC, your money, do what you feel is best. Personally, I'd also look at the Antec Neo HE units, also in the 550 watt range. Should be a bit less than the OCZ, although not as highly rated, and I can personally vouch for their overall performance. Not exactly quiet though. I don't see anyone saying to get a PCP&C, or a Silverstone, etc, just recommending that you stay away from the rosewill's. Some from personal experience.

So, back to the research slog, and this time pay attention. There's a difference between cynacism and realistic expectations. And now I've wasted a whole 30 seconds trying to save you some grief.
March 9, 2008 7:04:58 AM

OUCH!

I case you didn't already understand the Rosewill is junk and will probably force a complete upgrade on you, if it doesn't burn down your house.

According to eXtreme Power Supply Calculator v2.5 for your current configuration you need a PSU with a wattage of 313W. That does not take into consideration current (amperage) per rail. It is also understood that you aren't looking for a Rosewill or Coolermaster or some other such junk in order to save a few bucks. Avoiding the junk PSU can be done with a little research. The Amperage on the 12V rails concern can pretty much be eliminated by getting a single rail PSU. As far as upgrading etc. that is why you buy a PSU that is larger, i.e., has some headroom.

Here is the PSU list Official XS Tiered PSU Manufacturer Brand Listing Phase III - XtremeSystems Forums. It's not exactly up to date, but it will give you a good idea.
March 9, 2008 7:19:59 AM

Here is the OP from jhyukkang, he posted earlier about his experience with the Rosewill. All of the PSUs are good although I'm not sure about the Antec Neo. Croc seems to think they are good. All you need to do is determine what upgrades you might be doing and the headroom that you want to have. psu recondations? I suggest you read the whole thread, it's less than one page.
jhyukkang said:
man. im having hard time to narrow down the psu choices.
im down to these psus, from newegg, tigerdirect, and buy.com (depends on the price, - lowest) all shipped price

please select that is very very safe and the one that i can bet my 1500build. also for the money....(under100)obviously
im not using high end gpu, so i need 400w, but i want to gove psu some space
antec earthwatt 430 50$ newegg
antec earthwatt 500 100$ newegg
antec neo 550 94$ buy
corsair vx450 70$ Tigerdirect
corsair hx520 100$ buy
OCZ SXS 500 40$ Tigerdirect
PCP&C 470 75$ Tigerdirect
Seasonic 500gb 95$ newegg
March 9, 2008 7:28:57 AM

A 450 watt PSU doesn't sound good for future upgrades, 550W is a better choice. Then again more is sometimes better, I wish I had bought the Enermax Galaxy 1000W instead of my Enermax Infiniti 720W.
March 9, 2008 1:24:59 PM

Hi doomsdaydave11

I would recommend trying to buy a Tier 2 PSU from the list on the XS website:
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=108088

The Corsair HX, Hiper (high wattage), Antec Neo, Enermax Liberty series are all affordable... I have an Ultra X3 model in my external HD box (OK thats for 16 HDs guys!!). Future proofing you with 1KW and very high quality modular cabling/unit build quality.

I have had the experience of using a cheap PSU... Luckly when it blew up it only took out one RAM stick out (which I was able to RMA). It was a build for someone else so no worries... :pt1cable:  If you like looking at the Windows blue screen of doom then go with a cheap PSU...

I am using a PC Power & Cooling PSU in my main rig (Tier 1). It is well built and it is one less thing to worry about. :sol: 

Bob


March 9, 2008 2:06:07 PM

I used the rosewill 600 watt for a year and a half, it was quiet and reliable, that being said, I was on pins and needles for a year and a half because i knew it was'nt the best brand, like someone posted earlier rosewill are hit and miss. I now have the corsair 750 watt psu ,it can be had for like 120 after rebates on buy.com
March 9, 2008 3:15:53 PM

First off I think the chances of a PSU actually blowing up on you are pretty low, even with those units.

There is a lot of hype on enthusiast forums about the merits of expensive PSU's. All enthusiasts like to have decent stuff but I tend to think the scare stories being used to justify spending a big chunk of a budget on a PSU are a bit much sometimes.

I have a Coolermaster psu which is Tier 5 on that listing, which is hardly 'official'... it's just someone's condensed opinion based on the research they have done. My PSU handles my over clocked system just fine with spot on and stable voltages. The unit is basic but does contain high quality capacitors. Certainly am not expecting it to go down at any moment, taking other components with it in a ball of fire!

Get a decent unit from a reputable company and check a review or two to make it's okay - don't go a spend a fortune on the back of paranoia.

I'd recommend something upwards of 600 watt personally for a good degree of future proofing, but that is assuming you don't intend to run crossfire or sli. Look at the new graphics cards coming out and they are pretty power hungry.

As a note, what's with the attitude on this thread? If you think it's an obvious question just don't bother posting your answer / opinion...
March 9, 2008 3:38:24 PM

Maximus_Delta said:
First off I think the chances of a PSU actually blowing up on you are pretty low, even with those units.

There is a lot of hype on enthusiast forums about the merits of expensive PSU's. All enthusiasts like to have decent stuff but I tend to think the scare stories being used to justify spending a big chunk of a budget on a PSU are a bit much sometimes.

I have a Coolermaster psu which is Tier 5 on that listing, which is hardly 'official'... it's just someone's condensed opinion based on the research they have done. My PSU handles my over clocked system just fine with spot on and stable voltages. The unit is basic but does contain high quality capacitors. Certainly am not expecting it to go down at any moment, taking other components with it in a ball of fire!

Get a decent unit from a reputable company and check a review or two to make it's okay - don't go a spend a fortune on the back of paranoia.

I'd recommend something upwards of 600 watt personally for a good degree of future proofing, but that is assuming you don't intend to run crossfire or sli. Look at the new graphics cards coming out and they are pretty power hungry.

As a note, what's with the attitude on this thread? If you think it's an obvious question just don't bother posting your answer / opinion...


I don't think anyone is recommending he spend a huge amount of money, but rather to get a quality PSU.
There is really little reason to get a PSU that powerful.
The 3870x2 uses a max of 200w per AMD, though It's never used over 180w in any test I've seen.
Toss in 100w for a current non OC'd Current Intel Quad and you are only looking at 300w for the most power hungry components at max usage. Toss in another 100w for HDDs, RAM, and other minor components and he is using less than 400w.

Therefore a quality 500w PSU is more than poweful enough for a far more power hungry system than he is buying.

Along with more reliability, the higher quality CPUs will likely use about 10% less power due to a higher efficiency.
(80+ vs 70+)

While the savings may not be huge, over 3 years the price difference could be paid for.
Add to that a higher quality fan for lower noise.
And Yes, better quality for more reliability which will better protect your components.

a b ) Power supply
March 9, 2008 4:21:07 PM

Zorg said:
OUCH!

I case you didn't already understand the Rosewill is junk and will probably force a complete upgrade on you, if it doesn't burn down your house.

According to eXtreme Power Supply Calculator v2.5 for your current configuration you need a PSU with a wattage of 313W. That does not take into consideration current (amperage) per rail. It is also understood that you aren't looking for a Rosewill or Coolermaster or some other such junk in order to save a few bucks. Avoiding the junk PSU can be done with a little research. The Amperage on the 12V rails concern can pretty much be eliminated by getting a single rail PSU. As far as upgrading etc. that is why you buy a PSU that is larger, i.e., has some headroom.

Here is the PSU list Official XS Tiered PSU Manufacturer Brand Listing Phase III - XtremeSystems Forums. It's not exactly up to date, but it will give you a good idea.



Agreed. Get a Corsair, PP&C, or an OCZ for good PSUs.
a c 83 ) Power supply
March 9, 2008 6:21:33 PM

Quote:
First off I think the chances of a PSU actually blowing up on you are pretty low, even with those units.


Then you need to get out more. The odds might be low, but it does happen. Start reading PSU reviews on Jonnyguru, anandtech, Hardocp, etc and watch them explode.

Quote:
There is a lot of hype on enthusiast forums about the merits of expensive PSU's.


Possibly because they know something you don't.

Quote:
I have a Coolermaster psu which is Tier 5 on that listing, which is hardly 'official'... it's just someone's condensed opinion based on the research they have done. My PSU handles my over clocked system just fine with spot on and stable voltages. The unit is basic but does contain high quality capacitors.


High quality caps huh? How do you know? Did you open it and look at them? Do you consider them high quality caps because your rails are all in spec? Can you even list 3 "high quality" cap manufacturers?

Sorry friend, but most of your post (to me anyways...) reads like a rant. You bought something, and are doing your best to convince people that you haven't made a mistake. You remind me of a coworker who was trying to convince me that his new 8500GT is a good gaming video card. (I checked, its about equal to the 7300GT.) The tier listing might just be "someones opinion", but its an opinion I trust a lot more then yours.
a c 137 ) Power supply
March 9, 2008 7:03:24 PM

@doomsdaydave11:
There are several differences between the two units.
Corsair efficiency goes to 85%, rosewill 72%. This makes a difference in elctricity usage, and cooling requirements.

Corsair is 41a on 12v rails, vs. 35a for rosewill. This is the most important capability measure for a psu, not wattage. Even though the wattages are the same, the corsair is more capable, and will not run as close to full out.

Corsair has 8 industry approvals, rosewill has 4.

corsair has 2.2 spec, rosewill is 2.01.

Corsair has pfc(power factor correction), rosewill=no.

Cheap units like rosewill warrant their units at 25c, which is unrealistic in a computer case. Quality units use 50c.

The posters here are correct; a PSU is not the best place to save money. If you have to, get a cheaper case instead.
March 9, 2008 7:16:38 PM

heck i picked up my ThermalTake PurePower 2.0 500 watt psu for 50 bucks at Radio Shack. I was using a Ultra 500 watter till it just stopped workung after a couple of months.
March 9, 2008 9:19:54 PM

Hi

If you get the Rosewill PSU just make sure you have a good warranty on all the components in you PC, turn up the aircon to max. and don't use the PC for more than 30 minutes per day. Also backup daily to external HD or DVD!! :hello: 

Bob


March 9, 2008 9:48:22 PM

I think he got the message about the Rosewill.

Maybe he never came back after the somewhat unnecessary thrashing by croc.
March 9, 2008 9:52:48 PM

doomsdaydave11 said:
I don't like wasting cash.

Neither do I. That's why I don't buy crappy PSUs that could blow up my system ;) 

With PC hardware in general, "better safe than sorry" is a good rule to go by. You're much more likely to kick yourself because you were too cheap than you are to regret the purchase of a higher quality component.
March 9, 2008 10:11:44 PM

Yes, power supplies are such a critical component to be sure. After all they convert the power from the grid into something usable by the PC.

Dell, Acer, Gateway and Lenovo could all learn a very valuble lesson from all of you highly motivated and super intelligent ones posting such expensive advice in this thread. Yes....they could learn how to throw away a ton of money.

I have no quibble with those of you who are protecting your $1000 and more components by investing in quasi-priced PSUs, however....to spend $100+ on a power supply for a $600 system is overkill and a waste of money. I have built low end systems with tier 5 PSUs for over 25 years, and yes I have had failures, but seldom do they take any other component(s) with them. I have some systems in place far beyond any anticipated life span that still have the original PSU working and working well. Those systems that do fail, I can replace the PSU 3 times before I approach the price of even a tier 2 unit...so go ahead spend your money, and I will save mine.

Also to those of you who have nothing better to do than launch scathing attacks on those asking for advice....Get a life! No one asked for your acidic remarks, and personally I find such behavior repulsive and childish. The reason for these forums is to share information, and such ones should be warned then banned for such negative behavior.
March 9, 2008 10:39:19 PM

onestar said:
Yes, power supplies are such a critical component to be sure. After all they convert the power from the grid into something usable by the PC.

Dell, Acer, Gateway and Lenovo could all learn a very valuble lesson from all of you highly motivated and super intelligent ones posting such expensive advice in this thread. Yes....they could learn how to throw away a ton of money.

I have no quibble with those of you who are protecting your $1000 and more components by investing in quasi-priced PSUs, however....to spend $100+ on a power supply for a $600 system is overkill and a waste of money. I have built low end systems with tier 5 PSUs for over 25 years, and yes I have had failures, but seldom do they take any other component(s) with them. I have some systems in place far beyond any anticipated life span that still have the original PSU working and working well. Those systems that do fail, I can replace the PSU 3 times before I approach the price of even a tier 2 unit...so go ahead spend your money, and I will save mine.

Also to those of you who have nothing better to do than launch scathing attacks on those asking for advice....Get a life! No one asked for your acidic remarks, and personally I find such behavior repulsive and childish. The reason for these forums is to share information, and such ones should be warned then banned for such negative behavior.


Or maybe you need to learn a bit about how these manufacturers work............
The many of Dell's PSUs are actually PCP&C OEM PSUs.
They are not high Wattage (Usually 300w or 380w depending on the model or selected components)
So they are not "cheap" "tier 5" for the most part.

Who is recommending a $100 PSU in this thread?
Good Tier II PSUs from $40ish to $60ish have been recommended.
(The Antec might even be under $40 when you take into the account the value of the excellent case.)
(The Corsair 450w from BUY.com is $49.99 w/shipping after Google Checkout)

The cost savings from power can start to grow quit a bit as the quality of the PSU drops lower and lower.
Many of the Tier 5 PSUs may not even hit 60% efficiency under many loads while the ones recommended hit mid 80s.

For a 300w load, this could be over 60w more being consumed from the wall just to run your PC.
So long as you are not using your mothers electicity, you should care about this as well.

You also realize the lower end PSUs sold in the US are Illegal for sale in Europe due to the fire hazard they present?

Nobody in this thread is "bashing" anyone.
We are trying to educate.
March 9, 2008 11:06:42 PM

onestar said:
quasi-priced PSUs
Maybe you could help me, what's a quasi-priced anything?

Happy to see you got lucky with your junk PSUs, this earlier poster did not
jhyukkang said:
DUDE!!!!! i just had that psu, fried my mobo!!!!!, maybe i just got bad psu, it worked for 2months,
A rule of thumb that some people use is 10% of the price of the system. So, 60$ for a $600 system, $100 for a $1000 system etc. It sounds about right to me. One thing to consider, just because you are getting an inexpensive PSU doesn't mean it has to be a junk PSU.

I won't address your comments about the thrashing that the OP got, from one poster in particular, because I agree it was harsh, but most posters on this thread were not hostile. There is some frustration on occasion about people that do not understand the difference between a quality built PSU and a shiny junk PSU with good marketing.

You were actually correct in your sarcastic opening remark. It is important to have a quality piece of equipment to convert the power from the grid into something usable by the PC. It's also important to have a UPS or at least a power conditioner to further clean up the crap power received from the grid. In some places this is much more important than others. A junk PSU doesn't have to fail/explode to damage components. A PSU with poor regulation/filtering can easily damage components like HDs etc. over time. The funny thing is that people blame the HD and not the garbage power source. I'm surprised you are not aware of this.

You are also correct when you say that HP could learn from these posts. Here is a little story. My niece had an HP POS machine. I had two HD failures in about 2-3 years. I finally got irritated and swapped cases, the original was a 2/3 junk PSU case, and installed a reasonable quality PSU. It has been about 5 years with no HD failures. Now you could say it was just happenstance I prefer to believe it was the crap OEM PSU.
March 9, 2008 11:46:16 PM

zenmaster said:
Or maybe you need to learn a bit about how these manufacturers work............
The many of Dell's PSUs are actually PCP&C OEM PSUs.
They are not high Wattage (Usually 300w or 380w depending on the model or selected components)
So they are not "cheap" "tier 5" for the most part.

Who is recommending a $100 PSU in this thread?
Good Tier II PSUs from $40ish to $60ish have been recommended.
(The Antec might even be under $40 when you take into the account the value of the excellent case.)
(The Corsair 450w from BUY.com is $49.99 w/shipping after Google Checkout)

The cost savings from power can start to grow quit a bit as the quality of the PSU drops lower and lower.
Many of the Tier 5 PSUs may not even hit 60% efficiency under many loads while the ones recommended hit mid 80s.

For a 300w load, this could be over 60w more being consumed from the wall just to run your PC.
So long as you are not using your mothers electicity, you should care about this as well.


You also realize the lower end PSUs sold in the US are Illegal for sale in Europe due to the fire hazard they present?

Nobody in this thread is "bashing" anyone.
We are trying to educate.


"Learn a bit"....ahhhh yes, the old smarter than thou ploy. While I am open to any "learning" that is available, and especially so when it equates to economic efficiency, perhaps you could benefit from some rather obvious and readily availbale information before you post. Namely, the OPs posting which specifically referred to PSUs in that price range. And yes, Dell, Gateway, and Acer ALL use substantial numbers of tier 5 PSUs. I know because I have replaced them for years and occasionally still do. Rosewill, for the most part is merely rebranded Aspire units.

The PSUs efficiency rating is the number I suspect you are alluding to, and yes while a difference of 8% to 12% can make a small differece in the TCO of a system which is drawing 500-600 watts, it is not the PSU which makes as much difference as it is the system load. At 8 cents a kw/hour, you could save as much as $25 over the course of a year, IF you ran your 300 watt system at full load 24/7. Substantially less, if you or your PC ever sleep. so your mom does need to worry overmuch.

I am not saying that a quality PSU is not a very good thing, for most know it to be essential for quality builds. I am saying that price/performance ratios seem to be a little misleading from my point of view. The only real way to determine said perfomance is by it's track record. The FSP units seem to have a great record and I use them for my "better" systems. I do advocate the use of quality PSUs in a direct ratio to the cost of the other components.

March 9, 2008 11:54:43 PM

doomsdaydave11 said:
I'm going to get a new rig soon and the total parts will eventually add up to the following:
Intel Core 2 Duo e8400
4GB DDR2-800 (4 sticks total)
NVIDIA GeForce 8800GTS 512MB
160GB SATA2 + 120GB IDE HDDs
2x 120MM fans + 1x 140MM fan.
1 Lightscribe DVD+/-RAM drive.
No overclocking, and on a medium end, standard Gigabyte board (nothing special)

What would be the benefit of getting this PSU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Instead of this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
The price difference is not a small one. Why would I pay $40+ extra the Corsair PSU that I saw recommended several times by different people in another thread? I don't like wasting cash. Thanks for any answers.



I would definitely buy a better quality PSU for $40 dollars, its called ripple current and it can kill all your components. A higher quality PSU has a much smaller percentage of ripple current. You could spend $40 dollars on a movie and dinner.
March 9, 2008 11:57:12 PM

systemlord said:
I would definitely buy a better quality PSU for $40 dollars more, its called ripple current and it can kill all your components. A higher quality PSU has a much smaller percentage of ripple current. You could spend $40 dollars on a movie and dinner.


I mean $40 dollars more for a beeter PSU
March 10, 2008 12:01:31 AM

Stop it, your making me hungry for a beefy dinner.
March 10, 2008 1:04:49 AM

onestar said:
Yes, power supplies are such a critical component to be sure. After all they convert the power from the grid into something usable by the PC.

Dell, Acer, Gateway and Lenovo could all learn a very valuble lesson from all of you highly motivated and super intelligent ones posting such expensive advice in this thread. Yes....they could learn how to throw away a ton of money.


There is less difference between a Dell, HP, etc 300W PSU and a $100 ~ 500W PSU than there is between a junk 500W PSU and a good one. OEMs get great contract prices on PSU and can determine the power each system uses so they only have to cut corners on higher current areas of the PSU, maintaining reliablity by not cutting corners on other areas. If you can get one of these OEM power supplies as surplus, go ahead and do it as they are a great value for the price if it's really sold as surplus instead of some OEM parts supplier.

Quote:
I have no quibble with those of you who are protecting your $1000 and more components by investing in quasi-priced PSUs, however....to spend $100+ on a power supply for a $600 system is overkill and a waste of money.


A waste unless you want it to last for the life of the system, and possibly through a few upgrades. The goal should not be to try and get the least PSU that can run a system, it will effect the lifespan. It's no cheaper having to replace a psu later even if it doesn't kill any other parts. That doesn't mean someone has to spend $100, but there is a sane middle ground between low end and high end.

Quote:
I have built low end systems with tier 5 PSUs for over 25 years,


Maybe you meant 2.5 years? Most of those tier 5 manufacturers didn't exist anywhere close to 25 years ago. There's a big difference in today's systems and those of about 10 years ago, that 10 years ago the ratio of system current used to PSU rating was lower. The heat density in the (same form factor) PSU was lower. The required (voltage) rise times for stablity was longer when systems were slower. The capacitor, capacitance density was lower with thicker dielectric reducing internal losses which cause increasing heating after some aging.


Quote:
and yes I have had failures, but seldom do they take any other component(s) with them. I have some systems in place far beyond any anticipated life span that still have the original PSU working and working well. Those systems that do fail, I can replace the PSU 3 times before I approach the price of even a tier 2 unit...so go ahead spend your money, and I will save mine.


You'll have instability before a complete failure which risks data, downtime to the system meaning you either do without or must have a backup system (which also costs money or at least space), plus the time spent ordering receiving uninstalling reinstalling diagnosing blah blah blah. Someone could take your philosophy about everything they own, and they'd have a life full of problems. True, the odds of one thing failing are low but when you add up all the things that failed prematurely you become a slave to the greed whether it be looking for that golden deal, repairing, replacing, or just getting worked up about someone else's opinion.

Quote:
Also to those of you who have nothing better to do than launch scathing attacks on those asking for advice....Get a life! No one asked for your acidic remarks, and personally I find such behavior repulsive and childish. The reason for these forums is to share information, and such ones should be warned then banned for such negative behavior.


If you only spent 1/3rd as much and used FSP models, the only way you can reasonably end up with a system running long term is if it's a similarly cheap lower power consuming system but for $600 budget spent frugally someone can easily overtax a generic or lesser wattage PSU. Some will literally have their capacitors fail just sitting on a shelf unused because the electrolyte isn't entirely stable and I don't just mean the infamous defective caps there was a scandal about a few years back.

The responsible answer to a question about PSU is to be conservative instead of assuming someone else wants to take a gamble on a lesser quality unit. If they didn't mind the gamble they wouldn't have spent any time thinking about it in the first place. 1/6th of the system budget on a PSU may be overkill, but certainly it's better to err on the safer side, you can't take the money with you when you die.
March 10, 2008 1:06:27 AM

I left for the better part of the day, and came back to see that my thread had 34 posts :o . Thanks for your help, I do get the message that it's not worth the risk. I've decided to spend almost twice as much on the Corsair VX550 instead of getting a Rosewill. It will be better to get that Corsair unit now, which will last me quite a while, instead of having to buy a new one in a few years. Besides, that one has a five year warranty instead of the no warranty the the other one had :) .
March 10, 2008 1:38:20 AM

Excellent choice! Another one's seen the light. It's still cheaper at buy.com whether or not you take advantage of the rebate and use the google checkout. That's $20 you'll be able to use for anythimg else you may need and yes, you can call me frugal. Best of luck with your build.
March 10, 2008 3:01:41 AM

4745454b said:
Then you need to get out more.


wtf?

4745454b said:
High quality caps huh? How do you know? Did you open it and look at them? Do you consider them high quality caps because your rails are all in spec? Can you even list 3 "high quality" cap manufacturers?


I read a review and I know who manufactures the capacitors in my PSU.

4745454b said:
Sorry friend, but most of your post (to me anyways...) reads like a rant. You bought something, and are doing your best to convince people that you haven't made a mistake. You remind me of a coworker who was trying to convince me that his new 8500GT is a good gaming video card. (I checked, its about equal to the 7300GT.) The tier listing might just be "someones opinion", but its an opinion I trust a lot more then yours.


Well, I'll let you know if the computer blows up... was my 8800GT a good choice btw... can you see a trend of selecting the wrong stuff in my signature spec?
a c 83 ) Power supply
March 10, 2008 4:02:22 AM

Quote:
I read a review and I know who manufactures the capacitors in my PSU.


So who makes them then? Don't keep us in suspense.

I wrote what I did not to attack you, but as a response to what you were trying to say. If you did research on your computer, great. But as was pointed out, no one here is suggesting $150+ PSUs. The most expensive ones are $100, and there isn't a 600W found on that list. Again, many suggested PSUs were in the 400-500W range, and are around $75. If we were suggesting 1kW PSUs with $200 price tags, then your post would have been appropriate.
!