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Can i slow my psu fan down? its noisy

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March 14, 2008 2:50:16 AM

Hi guys,
Got a couple of questions about the two 120mm fans in my computer. I had to replace my case fan a couple of weeks ago as the other one became noisy and just recently I've had to replace the one in my power supply.

1. Firstly is this normal that 120mm fans don't last long because i don't want to be replacing them this often, or could it have been because both those fans were cheap and nasty (they seemed generic makes). I've now got a cool master for my case fan running at 1200rpm (so nice a quiet :)  ). Or could it be that as these fans are close to each other and are adjacent(L shaped) to one another that they are wearing out being in an L shaped position and sucking against each other.

2. I recently put a Zalman quiet fan in the power supply with some silicon clips to hold it in yet because its running at 1800rpm its generally making the computer more noisy then i would like. I can clock it down to 1000/1100rpm but as the original fan seem to spin at 1800rpm i have set it to this speed. So can someone tell me if its safe to slow it down or will the power supply overheat. Its a besta power supply at 500W.

Thanks in advance guys, please tell me if you want more information to better help any responses.

More about : slow psu fan noisy

March 14, 2008 6:39:03 AM

Hi

I'd be more concerned the likely hood of motherboard / RAM death just from running a dubious PSU. Google on the make and the results do not inspire confidence... I trust you aren't using an expensive motherboard or RAM and that these parts are "expendable"...

The last thing you need in a cheapo, generic PSU is less cooling. They are not rated to provide full load at 50C and just tend to blow up when they get that hot...

Arctic cooling fans are way better then any Zalman fan BTW. Most "silent" fans have no airflow.

Bob
March 14, 2008 7:20:15 AM

Beyond whether or not its a quality part....

put your hand on the back of the power supply. the air should be relatively cool. If it is, you can afford to back it down. If you put it under load with the fan in slow mode, and it gets hot, the heatsinks are not large enough to dissipate the heat and that is why it required a large noisy fan. The optimal setup for slower fans to make sure air is going through sufficiently and nice and cool - is to have the 120mm underneath, and 2x80 mm. 1 pushing, 1 pulling. Do what you can with it, just dont let it cook itself to death and kill your system.
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March 15, 2008 5:42:43 AM

bobwya said:
Hi

I'd be more concerned the likely hood of motherboard / RAM death just from running a dubious PSU. Google on the make and the results do not inspire confidence... I trust you aren't using an expensive motherboard or RAM and that these parts are "expendable"...

The last thing you need in a cheapo, generic PSU is less cooling. They are not rated to provide full load at 50C and just tend to blow up when they get that hot...

Arctic cooling fans are way better then any Zalman fan BTW. Most "silent" fans have no airflow.

Bob


Well i bought this psu coz it was cheap but it was amd/intel recommended as far as i know. But i do have doubts whether it is actually a besta, insides seem cheap and generic and i don't see how it has RPM monitoring when the fan in it was a 2PIN!, me thinks besta is a hack brand or i was sold a dud of ebay. As for the zalman fan i will have to agree it is disappointing in terms of quietness but i am happy with my cool master. I will take your recommendation and try an arctic cooling fan next time i buy fans. Are you able to recommend a cheap but decent psu. Because most of the good ones cost between $100-$200 and i don't want to spend that much, i mean unless you get a 5 year warranty or something lol that way i'd know i would have got my money's worth.
March 15, 2008 6:45:46 AM

ill recommend u one Corsair VX 450.
March 15, 2008 7:26:32 AM

Paul_gren said:
ill recommend u one Corsair VX 450.


I would second that. Corsair PSU's always have good reviews. You don't need massive amounts of power unless you are running 8800 GTX/Ultra's or SLI/crossfire GPUs!! Although the PSU only has 450Watts the design uses only a single 12v rail at 33A peak power. Thats ~400Watts on the 12V rail where it counts!!

Bob

March 16, 2008 1:03:11 AM

Yer i actually have my eye on a corsair 620W power supply, i know thats a bit greedy but i want something that will give me plenty of room for future upgrades. Its just the shops 1 year return to base warranty that gets me. What do you guys think, should i just hope the thing last years or try and get a couple of years warranty with it ?
March 16, 2008 2:12:04 PM

doarules said:
Yer i actually have my eye on a corsair 620W power supply, i know thats a bit greedy but i want something that will give me plenty of room for future upgrades. Its just the shops 1 year return to base warranty that gets me. What do you guys think, should i just hope the thing last years or try and get a couple of years warranty with it ?


In my experience good gear tends to die immediately (or almost) or it lasts for years. Corsair gear is top notch and you should be fine with a 1 year warranty.

Bob
March 16, 2008 3:28:59 PM

Never, ever buy a cheap PSU, you just end up buying another PSU to replace it when it goes bad, and it will go bad.
PSU's will degrade over time, it's the second law of thermodynamics. The better the parts inside the PSU the lower the degradation, the longer the PSU life.
Cheap PSU's have cheap parts.
!