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10 reasons why to build your own computer:

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February 19, 2008 2:16:00 AM

I wanted to see what you all think when you think about the top ten reasons why someone should build their own computer...

More about : reasons build computer

February 19, 2008 2:48:43 AM

It's built how you want it. That's my biggest reason I think. Other than the fact that it's fun.
February 19, 2008 2:55:07 AM

Word...
like for me its about customization and control...
10. Its fun
9. Learn a lot while researching for the "perfect" build
8. Saves a TON of money
7. Make it look however I want
....
Related resources
February 19, 2008 2:55:56 AM

Few reasons:

1. You get to reuse existing parts. When next I want to upgrade I can still use my case, PSU, drives and soundcard and maybe my video card, RAM, etc. Depending on platform. This saves money.

2. You can OC. Many/most brand PCs will not permit.

3. Boutique PCs are nice alternatives and prolly let you OC but they are pricey. The cheaper major brand PCs have more limitations, as mentioned above. I'd say for an OC, gaming PC it's cheaper to get quality on your own build.

4. You learn how to build and troubleshoot. Keeps you from being at mercy of the god awful geek squads out there.


5. It's fun. I love a new build!
February 19, 2008 3:03:35 AM

1. Cheaper
2. Sense of accomplishment
3. Greater control of quality
4. Greater flexibility and customization
5. Greater upgradeability
6. Learning experience
February 19, 2008 3:05:27 AM

I'll add this

6. For the challenge. For some people the challenge is doing it for the first time. For others it's trying to make a build within a certain budget and getting the most bang for your buck.

I think I agree with the rest so far unless anyone has a better trump card.
February 19, 2008 3:33:09 AM

7. Building it and having it turn on for the first time. (assuming it turns on)
8. Sense of accomplishment.
a c 84 B Homebuilt system
February 19, 2008 3:39:55 AM

Avoiding "bloatware".
February 19, 2008 4:00:11 AM

9. getting an unlocked BIOS
10. More drivers updated more often
11. longer warranty - most parts have 3 yrs
12. because you Can!!!
13. easier to upgrade
14. more power and more drives
15. see # 1 :sleep: 

Quote:
Avoiding "bloatware".


not such a big deal because I tend to NUKE AN PAVE :bounce:  a new PC anyways
February 19, 2008 4:58:18 AM

Unwrappping the new components is always quite a lot of fun to me:) 
February 19, 2008 6:21:48 AM

What a pile of crap from alienware. The only reason to buy and get ripped off by them is if you are lazy, technically inept and have money to waste. Not to mention the fun that comes along with building yourself.
February 19, 2008 7:27:24 AM

We can have too many reasons why it's actually better to make your own pc. I personally would build my own pc but not everybody is in the same situation. Here are my 10 reasons not to build your own pc.

10. Time spent to learn about computer hardware and software.

9. Time spent to shop around for best deals for single or multiple components.

8. Time spent waiting for new and upcoming technology.

7. Individual warranties.

6. Getting accustomed to personal preference of PC building.

5. Trial and error of building a PC from the ground up.

4. In theory it works, doesn't mean it will.

3. Not practical for general user. Game consoles are.

2. Overclocking only matters to a small handful, the rest do not understand.

1. E-P3niS is a fabrication and is to not be confused with real hardware.

=D


The truth is if you can't spend more then $500 on a computer do not build your own, OEMs can get you a decent $500 computer with the OS pre-installed for you.

Buy a X-BOX360 or PS3 if you want to play games on a budget. If you have $1000+ then build your own computer, otherwise its really not practical.

But, if you are a slickdeals junkie more power to you! =D
February 19, 2008 8:13:06 AM

only two reason.

more bang for the buck, extract the most out of your budget.

and it feels good beacuse you built the pc yourself.
February 19, 2008 8:19:31 AM

three reasons =D
February 19, 2008 12:38:06 PM

I'm all for building my own, and haven't bought one since my very first PC.

I think the biggest con is the rate of failure on components. I've learned to live with it, but I've not known anyone to get a manufactured system that was DOA. My last build went good, but my Seagate drive died during the migration from previous build.

The biggest reason for me is the option to upgrade. Nothing like getting a PC that touts RAID, and then learning after you buy it that you can do RAID 1 only becuase of D***'s locked bios.
February 19, 2008 1:37:53 PM

derMeister said:
1. Cheaper
2. Sense of accomplishment
3. Greater control of quality
4. Greater flexibility and customization
5. Greater upgradeability
6. Learning experience



I agree with your reasons. those are probably the same ones I would have put down
a b B Homebuilt system
February 19, 2008 1:38:12 PM

Another reason to buy prebuilt, is if you have extremely limited space; no room in which to build and test, and save packing material for inevitable RMA. I last bought a system when I was in a little 1 br. apartment.
Then you need to find a boutique vendor who will build and test what you want, although beware the cheap PSU.
February 19, 2008 1:51:29 PM

because its yours. and you can do whatever you want change any piece without worrying about the seal in the case and void your warranty. and you know exactly how it works and how to make work
a b B Homebuilt system
February 19, 2008 1:52:39 PM

I agree with gwolfman, and add:

1a. maximize bang for buck, at any price
2a/6a. utter confidence to repair / upgrade in future
3a. attention to detail.
4a. personalized "value-weighting," e.g. CPU vs. GPU, case vs. HDD, etc...
February 19, 2008 1:59:36 PM

U can also show off to your friends that you got a better computer than them and u built it yourself. Building your own computer does not get rid of any warranties when you upgrade.
February 19, 2008 2:27:16 PM

Quote:
I wanted to see what you all think when you think about the top ten reasons why someone should build their own computer...


1. Chicks dig a guy that can build his own computer. MIRITE? :lol: 

Anyways, I'd say:

1. It's exactly what you want and need
2. Satisfaction for knowing you built a bitchen machine
3. Intimate knowledge of the system, easing repairs and reducing out of pocket expense.
4. Bragging rights.
5. The learning / troubleshooting experience from building. There is no better way to learn than to do. :) 

*edit*
Oh, yeah! Showing that dude that bought a $3k Alienware that your $1k system completely stomps his... priceless.
February 19, 2008 3:06:50 PM

Its not really cheaper to build a low end system, and sure not worth the pain. But for a decent gaming rig its way cheaper. for ex you can build for about 800-900 what would cost 1100-1500 built. Hardware assembly goes pretty fast but I hate the RMA's and the software issues. You can hardly get XP prebuilt anymore anyway so that's another reason. And vista is a bloated downgrade.
February 19, 2008 4:12:01 PM

Heh i love telling people my pc is half the price of thiers and has 2 times the performance + overclock ability.
February 19, 2008 5:02:31 PM

1. Much higher quality components for equal or less money
2. The satisfaction of building
February 19, 2008 5:12:34 PM

Did I mention that it's it tremendously fun to unwrap the parts? To hold that shiny new GC in your hands for the second last time? Don't know about you guys but that is amongst my 10 most favourite things when it comes to build a PC for myself...
February 20, 2008 1:25:28 PM

aziraphale said:
Did I mention that it's it tremendously fun to unwrap the parts? To hold that shiny new GC in your hands for the second last time? Don't know about you guys but that is amongst my 10 most favourite things when it comes to build a PC for myself...

Agreed.

There is that moment of high anxiety when you press 'start' the first time. . . .and nothing happens . . . . .
only to find out you forgot to flip the rear PSU switch on :D  . . .you hope . . . .
February 20, 2008 2:14:21 PM

I once had a customer hows son saved up is money to by an Alienware pc that cost around 5K.it was something similar to myine at the time ,which was less than 2K(buying parts over time).For me ,that was a big WHAAAAAW!.The customer thought my smile was in appriciation
February 21, 2008 1:47:41 PM

regardless of whether you budget is large or small building your own computer ALWAYS saves you money! The cheapest Dell (no monitor or speakers... nothing but the box) was $349, on newegg i was able to build one for $327 https://secure.newegg.com/NewVersion/WishList/TemporaryWishList.aspincluding a $10 MIR. So while it's cheaper, it would only make sense to build your own if you already knew what you were doing. Honestly though, If someone told me they wanted a $350 dollar computer... I would point them towards the Asus EEE ultraportable, At least it's a complete system! The EEE might even be more powerful as well (celeron 420 in the mentioned Dell)!

If your price range is $750 or more, building your own becomes an even greater bargain. Dell is known for using absolute junk when it comes to motherboards, PSU's and HDD's. The combination of all these junk components paired with the bloatware will make your machine clumsy, sluggish and maybe even BSOD prone. I've seen a lot of cheap PSU's and Mobo's cause a lot of problems in computers. When you build your own computer you have much greater quality control. I built a barton 2500+ system almost 6 years ago and it's still going strong on my fathers desk! I've heard of Dells arriving DOA! On top of the higher quality is getting what you want! Plan your upgrade path and pick your components well, and you could be using the same case, HDD, PSU, etc. for a long, long time saving you hundreds of bucks 2 years from now!

If you decide to build your own you will be forced to learn and research some information that will be very useful down the road when troubleshooting problems that might arise. Keep in mind that if you simply cannot operate a screwdriver, building a computer isn't for you (neither is using a stove or riding a bike... in fact, you might want to invest in a sturdy helmet). I think everyone should at least know how to reinstall or repair a windows installation! I know it's hard to put the dvd in the drive, enter your key and wait... seriously? As for alienware, well, my system cost over 25% less than their $2,000 equivalent. Not to mention high quality components that I'm confident will last well into my next build as well as the ability to overclock my system (thank you abit and zalman 9700!). Also, alienware computers look more like fancy coffe makers than computers... I much prefer my antec p182 thank you.

so heres the list:
1. You always get a better machine for your money or same machine for less.
2. All part's are known quantities.
3. Gain invaluable experience (we're all power levelers at heart).
4. Dell parts are cheap/junk/poop.
5. Dude, your not gettin' a Dell!
6. It's not as difficult as alienware says (remember to tighten the chinstrap on your helmet).
7. It's very rewarding and satisfying... to bash iTards when you find out you have the same computer but it cost 50% less!

... my $0.02. (computer dork manifesto)
February 21, 2008 2:04:51 PM

You get better quality when you build your own, most brands out there use some random parts, like motherboards from Tiwan or something. Also I find that most brand name systems use the crapiest PSU's. The best part for me is the actual hands on work that you can do with a custom build. I gives you a project to complete.
February 21, 2008 5:23:41 PM

totenkopf said:
regardless of whether you budget is large or small building your own computer ALWAYS saves you money! The cheapest Dell (no monitor or speakers... nothing but the box) was $349, on newegg i was able to build one for $327 https://secure.newegg.com/NewVersion/WishList/TemporaryWishList.aspincluding a $10 MIR. So while it's cheaper, it would only make sense to build your own if you already knew what you were doing. Honestly though, If someone told me they wanted a $350 dollar computer... I would point them towards the Asus EEE ultraportable, At least it's a complete system! The EEE might even be more powerful as well (celeron 420 in the mentioned Dell)!

If your price range is $750 or more, building your own becomes an even greater bargain. Dell is known for using absolute junk when it comes to motherboards, PSU's and HDD's. The combination of all these junk components paired with the bloatware will make your machine clumsy, sluggish and maybe even BSOD prone. I've seen a lot of cheap PSU's and Mobo's cause a lot of problems in computers. When you build your own computer you have much greater quality control. I built a barton 2500+ system almost 6 years ago and it's still going strong on my fathers desk! I've heard of Dells arriving DOA! On top of the higher quality is getting what you want! Plan your upgrade path and pick your components well, and you could be using the same case, HDD, PSU, etc. for a long, long time saving you hundreds of bucks 2 years from now!

If you decide to build your own you will be forced to learn and research some information that will be very useful down the road when troubleshooting problems that might arise. Keep in mind that if you simply cannot operate a screwdriver, building a computer isn't for you (neither is using a stove or riding a bike... in fact, you might want to invest in a sturdy helmet). I think everyone should at least know how to reinstall or repair a windows installation! I know it's hard to put the dvd in the drive, enter your key and wait... seriously? As for alienware, well, my system cost over 25% less than their $2,000 equivalent. Not to mention high quality components that I'm confident will last well into my next build as well as the ability to overclock my system (thank you abit and zalman 9700!). Also, alienware computers look more like fancy coffe makers than computers... I much prefer my antec p182 thank you.

so heres the list:
1. You always get a better machine for your money or same machine for less.
2. All part's are known quantities.
3. Gain invaluable experience (we're all power levelers at heart).
4. Dell parts are cheap/junk/poop.
5. Dude, your not gettin' a Dell!
6. It's not as difficult as alienware says (remember to tighten the chinstrap on your helmet).
7. It's very rewarding and satisfying... to bash iTards when you find out you have the same computer but it cost 50% less!

... my $0.02. (computer dork manifesto)


It would be tough to build your own cheaper.
Your Link is empty so I can't see what is there.
I doubt you had OS, Keyboard, Mouse, Speakers, etc...

Here is a nice Package for $379 with Shipping, OS, Monitor, Keyboard, Etc...

Dell Vostro 200 Pentium Dual Core E2140 1.6Ghz 1GB/80GB, DVD, XP or Vista Desktop + 19" LCD for $379 w/ free shipping. Thanks rounderlee

Specs:

Intel Pentium Dual-Core Processor E2140 (1.60GHz, 1MB L2 Cache)
Genuine Windows XP Home Edition or Vista Home Basic
Dell 19 inch Widescreen E198WFP Analog Flat Panel Monitor (w/ DVI)
1GB Dual Channel DDR2 SDRAM 667MHz - 2DIMMs
Single Drive: 16X DVD-ROM Drive
80GB Serial ATA Hard Drive (7200RPM) w/DataBurst Cache
Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 3100
Integrated 7.1 Channel Audio



Or Course if you need a Faster System, Get the Quad Core with a Seasonic PSU for $440...

(No Monitor, but it's all Ready for an 8800GT)
($250 for CPU & $100 for OS= $350. Feel Free to find the rest of the parts for $90)

Intel Core 2 Quad Processor Q6600 (8MB L2 cache,2.4GHz,1066FSB)
Genuine Windows Vista Home Basic - English
1GB Dual Channel DDR2 SDRAM at 667MHz- 2DIMMs
250GB Serial ATA Hard Drive (7200RPM) w/DataBurst Cache
16X DVD+/-RW Drive
Integrated Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 3100
Integrated 7.1 Channel Audio
Dell USB Keyboard and Dell Optical USB Mouse
56K PCI Data Fax Modem
Trend Micro Internet Security 36-months
3Yr In-Home Service, Parts + Labor, 24x7 Phone Support
Good Upgrades to consider:


February 21, 2008 5:30:05 PM

1. Manufactured PCs suck.
2. Manufactured PCs suck.
3. Manufactured PCs suck.
4. Manufactured PCs suck.
5. Manufactured PCs suck.
6. Manufactured PCs suck.
7. Manufactured PCs suck.
8. Manufactured PCs suck.
9. Manufactured PCs suck.
10. Manufactured PCs suck.
February 21, 2008 6:11:06 PM

resonance451 said:
1. Manufactured PCs suck.
2. Manufactured PCs suck.
3. Manufactured PCs suck.
4. Manufactured PCs suck.
5. Manufactured PCs suck.
6. Manufactured PCs suck.
7. Manufactured PCs suck.
8. Manufactured PCs suck.
9. Manufactured PCs suck.
10. Manufactured PCs suck.


+1

even more so now than before. BTX motherboards. need i say more?
February 21, 2008 6:29:33 PM

The only reason not to build your own computer is because you don't know how, and that's not a very good excuse because it's not that hard to learn the basics nowadays, what with all the support out there.

Being able to build your own computer and having a basic knowledge of the hardware/software you're using is becoming a basic skill these days, much like the ability to drive a car or work a cash register.
February 21, 2008 6:33:39 PM

rgeist554 said:
Quote:
I wanted to see what you all think when you think about the top ten reasons why someone should build their own computer...


1. Chicks dig a guy that can build his own computer. MIRITE? :lol: 

Anyways, I'd say:

1. It's exactly what you want and need
2. Satisfaction for knowing you built a bitchen machine
3. Intimate knowledge of the system, easing repairs and reducing out of pocket expense.
4. Bragging rights.
5. The learning / troubleshooting experience from building. There is no better way to learn than to do. :) 

*edit*
Oh, yeah! Showing that dude that bought a $3k Alienware that your $1k system completely stomps his... priceless.


I agree, I think the #1 part is just the fact that i built it, my way. .... AND Yah the chicks... they love a man who builds his own rig :)  LOL
February 21, 2008 6:37:09 PM

Hey ladies, I have a 1200w PSU... wanna get naked and dance to the TMNT theme?
a c 104 B Homebuilt system
February 21, 2008 6:38:12 PM

only one reason, because I can.
February 21, 2008 7:11:33 PM

omg rofl resonance451
February 21, 2008 7:16:29 PM

Quote:
Hey ladies, I have a 1200w PSU... wanna get naked and dance to the TMNT theme?


Haha. +1
a b B Homebuilt system
February 21, 2008 7:29:25 PM

1. Price (caveat: is only a factor when you get above $1200 or so....under that it's just about impossible to match what's out there from major vendors.)
2. Getting a real OS CD instead of a restore CD
3. Getting component manuals.
4. No price point compromises....vendors want to hit certain price points. Good marketing means advertising various component specs and then skimping on 1 or 2 non advertised ones.
5. Ya don't lose warranty when ya open the case to fix something.
6. When ya do 5 above, you already know how each part goes in / comes out.
7. You PC was made by a person with normal size hands and therefore your case design is such that you can actually do 5 and 6 above.
8. You probably spend an extra $20 on extyra cooling which will make everything last longer.
9. You can swap and upgrade w/o voiding warranty
10. In this millenium, girls will find you more attractive in a evolutionary sense. You need to have read this to understand this comment:
http://users.digitalindigo.net/~shane/fmd/scotadams.htm...
February 21, 2008 7:58:09 PM

There really is no better or worse. It's a matter of what you value and what resources you have at hand.

Factor in all the hours you've spent sitting in front of a monitor learning about building a computer, choosing parts, finding deals, etc., and building your own doesn't look like such a great investment. You build because you are interested and enjoy it.

A person with little interest or knowledge in computers pays a premium for prebuilts (which virtually evaporates at the <$600 level). The premium represents the cost of spending their time on non-computer building related activities that they value. Spread that premium over the life of the computer and it's not so much damage in proportion to the disposable income earned and spent over the same period. It's not a bad deal at all.





February 21, 2008 8:02:20 PM

That article was so roffle worthy I almost died. Thanks for the read.

metrazol said:
There really is no better or worse. It's a matter of what you value and what resources you have at hand.

Factor in all the hours you've spent sitting in front of a monitor learning about building a computer, choosing parts, finding deals, etc., and building your own doesn't look like such a great investment. You build because you are interested and enjoy it.

A person with little interest or knowledge in computers pays a premium for prebuilts (which virtually evaporates at the <$600 level). The premium represents the cost of spending their time on non-computer building related activities that they value. Spread that premium over the life of the computer and it's not so much damage in proportion to the disposable income earned and spent over the same period. It's not a bad deal at all.



I strongly disagree. Having knowledge of a computer these days is a very important and very basic skill. Notice how all those who don't have that knowledge are helpless as we being to depend more and more upon computers? Plus, there's also a fair amount of us who are doing this for a living. So once again, another situation in which it's not wasted time.

And you can't let the premium represent the cost of spending their time on other activities that they value because there's no way to assume how the rest of their life is spent.

Add the fact in that most pre-built computers (unless you're talking about the over-expensive botique builders) are stocked with the lowest-end quality parts from their class (like the very lowest quality processor of its kind, worst Intel chipset out there). When you build a computer on your own, you know what's going in there, have complete control over it, and you build it to last.

Oh, and how about all the time that the Gateway/Dell/HP user spends on the phone with tech support or sending it in to get repaired? You didn't factor that in.
February 21, 2008 8:55:31 PM

I like building because its fun lol.


Simple as that :D 
February 21, 2008 8:57:00 PM

resonance451 said:

I strongly disagree. Having knowledge of a computer these days is a very important and very basic skill. Notice how all those who don't have that knowledge are helpless as we being to depend more and more upon computers? Plus, there's also a fair amount of us who are doing this for a living. So once again, another situation in which it's not wasted time.

And you can't let the premium represent the cost of spending their time on other activities that they value because there's no way to assume how the rest of their life is spent.

Add the fact in that most pre-built computers (unless you're talking about the over-expensive botique builders) are stocked with the lowest-end quality parts from their class (like the very lowest quality processor of its kind, worst Intel chipset out there). When you build a computer on your own, you know what's going in there, have complete control over it, and you build it to last.

Oh, and how about all the time that the Gateway/Dell/HP user spends on the phone with tech support or sending it in to get repaired? You didn't factor that in.


It doesn't matter what the other activities are. It could be sitting around smoking weed, or it could be knitting sweaters for orphans, it could be prospecting for gold. Those activities don't translate into computer building skills, so in the context of this discussion the foregone computer building skills are an opportunity cost. Gateway/Dell/HP get a comparative advantage over those people in terms of the ability to build a PC because they can build them at a lower opportunity cost, so trade (dollars for computers) occurs. If someone values smoking weed or knitting sweaters (as evinced by the use of their time) over learning to build computers, that individual and Gateway/Dell/HP are in a mutually beneficial exchange.

The vast majority of people will do just fine not knowing what the crap goes on inside their computer. It's just like with cars. Doctors, accountants, lawyers, plumbers, English professors, Wal-Mart clerks, forest rangers, teachers, secretaries, airline pilots, truck mechanics, and the vast majority of the economy has no need for computer skills more advanced than MS Office. They rely on techies for that, just like the techies rely on them for medical, financial, legal, plumbing, etc. expertise. No one is getting left behind unless they don't keep current in their field.
February 21, 2008 9:06:05 PM

OK here we go

6-Building your own setup can be done over time
Buy mobo , cpu this week , powersupply and case next week or next month , Price's change on a daily basis. I wait to get a killer deal myself

5- You get what you want(or think you want )

4- If your not careful you mite learn something :) 

3- People will THINK your smart ( but we know better)

2- If the computer fails you can stand in front of a mirror and scream at the incompetent idiot who built that piece of POOP

1- All the girls will say OH my what a big brain you have :) 

OK thats my list of 10 reasons

Math is hard
February 21, 2008 9:14:06 PM

resonance451 said:
Hey ladies, I have a 1200w PSU... wanna get naked and dance to the TMNT theme?


FTW!!!

plus b1thces like it?

FTW!!!!!!!

:lol:  :lol:  :lol: 
a b B Homebuilt system
February 22, 2008 3:27:36 AM

SoiledBottom said:
1- All the girls will say OH my what a big brain you have :) 


Ok, I am old enough to already have been old when this article when it came out....but for those who haven't seen it....

http://users.digitalindigo.net/~shane/fmd/scotadams.htm...

Scott Adams
Windows Magazine, May 1995

"I get about 100 e-mail messages a day from readers of my comic strip "Dilbert." Most are from disgruntled office workers, psychopaths, stalkers, comic-strip fans -- that sort of person. But a growing number are from women who write to say they think Dilbert is sexy. Some say they've already married a Dilbert and couldn't be happier.

If you're not familiar with Dilbert, he's an electrical engineer who spends most of his time with his computer. He's a nice guy but not exactly Kevin Costner.

Okay, Dilbert is polite, honest, employed and educated. And he stays home. These are good traits, but they don't exactly explain the incredible sex appeal. So what's the attraction?

I think it's a Darwinian thing. We're attracted to the people who have the best ability to survive and thrive. In the old days it was important to be able to run down an antelope and kill it with a single blow to the forehead.

But that skill is becoming less important every year.

Now all that matters is if you can install your own Ethernet card without having to call tech support and confess your inadequacies to a stranger whose best career option is to work in tech support.

It's obvious that the world has three distinct classes of people, each with its own evolutionary destiny:

Knowledgeable computer users who will evolve into godlike non-corporeal beings who rule the universe (except for those who work in tech support).

Computer owners who try to pass as knowledgeable but secretly use hand calculators to add totals to their Excel spreadsheets. This group will gravitate toward jobs as high school principals and operators of pet crematoriums. Eventually they will become extinct.

Non-computer users who will grow tails, sit in zoos and fling dung at tourists.

Obviously, if you're a woman and you're trying to decide which evolutionary track you want your offspring to take, you don't want to put them on the luge ride to the dung-flinging Olympics. You want a real man. You want a knowledgeable computer user with evolution potential.

And women prefer men who listen. Computer users are excellent listeners because they can look at you for long periods of time without saying anything. Granted, early in a relationship it's better if the guy actually talks. But men use up all the stories they'll ever have after six months. If a woman marries a guy who's in, let's say, retail sales, she'll get repeat stories starting in the seventh month and lasting forever. Marry an engineer and she gets a great listener for the next 70 years.

Plus, with the ozone layer evaporating, it's a good strategy to mate with somebody who has an indoor hobby. Outdoorsy men are applying suntan lotion with SPF 10,000 and yet by the age of 30 they still look like dried chili peppers in pants. Compare that with the healthy glow of a man who spends 12 hours a day in front of a video screen.

It's also well established that computer users are better lovers. I know because I heard an actual anecdote from someone who knew a woman who married a computer user and they reportedly had sex many times. I realize this isn't statistically valid, but you have to admit it's the most persuasive thing I've written so far.

If you still doubt the sexiness of male PC users, consider their hair. They tend to have either: (1) male pattern baldness -- a sign of elevated testosterone -- or (2) unkempt jungle hair -- the kind you see only on people who just finished a frenzied bout of lovemaking. If this were a trial I think we could reach a verdict on the strong circumstantial evidence alone.

I realize there are a lot of skeptics out there. They'll delight in pointing out the number of computer users who wear wrist braces and suggest it isn't the repetitive use of the keyboard that causes the problem. That's okay. Someday those skeptics will be flinging dung at tourists. Then who'll be laughing? (Answer to rhetorical question: everybody but the tourists.)

Henry Kissinger said power is the ultimate aphrodisiac. And Bill Clinton said that knowledge is power. Therefore, logically, according to the U.S. government, knowledge of computers is the ultimate aphrodisiac. You could argue with me -- I'm just a cartoonist -- but it's hard to argue with the government. Remember, they run the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, so they must know a thing or two about satisfying women. You might think this was enough to convince anyone that men who use computers are sexy. But look at it from my point of view: I'm getting paid by the word for this article. I'm not done yet.

In less enlightened times, the best way to impress women was to own a hot car. But women wised up and realized it was better to buy their own hot cars so they wouldn't have to ride around with jerks.

Technology has replaced hot cars as the new symbol of robust manhood. Men know that unless they get a digital line to the Internet no woman is going to look at them twice.

It's getting worse. Soon anyone who's not on the World Wide Web will qualify for a government subsidy for the home-pageless. And nobody likes a man who takes money from the government, except maybe Marilyn Monroe, which is why the CIA killed her. And if you think that's stupid, I've got 100 words to go.

Finally, there's the issue of mood lighting. Nothing looks sexier than a man in boxer shorts illuminated only by a 15-inch SVGA monitor. If we agree that this is every woman's dream scenario, then I think we can also agree that it's best if the guy knows how to use the computer. Otherwise, he'll just look like a loser sitting in front of a PC in his underwear.

In summary, it's not that I think non-PC users are less attractive. It's just that I'm sure they won't read this article.
"
February 22, 2008 5:54:13 PM

Actually i wasn't making up the build...

Celeron 420 1.6ghz -$43.99
Windows Vista Home Basic 64bit OEM -$89.99
Crucial 1GB DDR2 667 -$22.99 (12.99 W/$10.00 MIR)
WD Caviar 7200RPM SATA 250GB HDD -$59.99
Lite-On 16x DVD burner/48x CD SATA -$24.99
Asus P5L-MX motherboard (onboard video/Audio) -$69.99
DCT factory standard USB keyboard -$4.99
Logitech SBF-90 optical mouse -$5.25
Linkworld 3230-02c222u Black case w/430w PSU -$19.99
microsoft works 8.5 OEM -$14.99

Grand total of $347.16 (I did forget about microsoft works)

This whole system could be a bit cheaper if you used a barebones system too. With MSI's MBOX p4M900M2-L you get a PSU, MoBo, integrated audio and video, and a case for $69.99 which would bring the price down to $327.27 or something.

By the way Zenmaster, non of the systems you mentioned up there are available on Dell's website. Maybe you, as well as me, need links? The $379 Vostro system in fact does NOT come with a monitor (http://configure.us.dell.com/dellstore/config.aspx?c=us...)
Also None of the Vostro lineup machines can be upgraded to a Q6600 or a Seasonic PSU unless I missed something. Those machines also do NOT include speakers in the price, not the machines you listed. which line is that that lets you upgrade to those choices? So far Zenmaster, nothing but a pile of turds has rolled out of your mouth. stop defending Dell! even if you did buy one of those crappy towers dell do you really think you could just buy a graphics card and throw it in there? If it was a slim tower it physically wouldn't fit. Would it affect your warranty? Also, a celeron 420 with one gig of DDR2 667 Ram wouldn't really be able to run Vista, let alone any decent games. If an OEM Q6600 costs $250 on newegg without a cooler, do you really think dell is going to give you a full system with one for $440? If they did i'm sure it would be nothing but top quality parts.



September 9, 2013 11:47:42 AM

rgeist554 said:
Quote:
Hey ladies, I have a 1200w PSU... wanna get naked and dance to the TMNT theme?


Haha. +1


Lol
!