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The Photographically Enhanced Self Help Thread (PESHT)

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February 26, 2008 2:00:02 AM

Hey Everyone. So, I'm here, right in middle of my first build ever, as you can see:



That picture was taken about 10 minutes ago. So I start off fine, I install the CPU (it's a C2D e2180), and the heatsink, cool right? yah so far. Then I go ahead and screw the PSU (It's an Antec Earthwatts 430w) into my Antec 900 case. Still, so far so good.



Then I start to run into the questions. First of all, where in the world do I plug these things in:



I have a feeling it's somewhere around HERE:



I just don't know where. And then I get to THESE THINGS:



I know the top one is a little hard to read, it says HD AUDIO. Where in the world do I plug these into? Now, I know I can probably do all this once the motherboard is installed, but that's where I have another problem. I don't know which screw goes where. And I've got a pile of them:



See what I mean? I'll number them so you can easily refer to them.

#1 Well, there are THESE ONES: (there are 4 of them total):



#2 Then there are THESE ONES (there are 12 of them total):



#3 Then there are THESE ONES (there are 24 of them total):



#4 Then there are THESE washers (there are 8 of them total):



#5 Then there are THESE (2 of them total):



#6 Then there are THESE (8 of them total):



I guess the last two won't show up because I've posted too many pictures. That's alright. I know I'm asking an aweful lot of questions, but I hope the images help. It's way easier than trying to explain to you what I mean.

TY in advance





February 26, 2008 2:20:34 AM

The screws are mostly extras, or for your video card/optical drives.

The motherboard should have a manual that tells you where on the motherboard each of the things you pictured belongs. You found the right location, just make sure you put each where it says. Ntice also how there is a + and -. These need to be aligned with the positive and negative sides of the connectors in your hand. The side with the arrow is usually positive.
February 26, 2008 2:51:22 AM

#1 screws to attach end of a PCI card to the case.

#6 screws for mounting HDD

#4 paper washers for mounting mobo to insulate mobo from standoffs. i think the consensus is if the motherboard has a big round silver "o" around the hole, then it wants direct contact with the standoff (spacer) to ground the mobo to the case, and if there is no silver "o" around the hole, use the spacer.

#2 screws are for use with the standoffs (spacers) to attach mobo to case.

Read this guide, it is multiple pages, my link is for the page about motherboards but read them all:
DIY computer build
February 26, 2008 2:56:21 AM

First of all, you need to get the motherboard installed in the case. There should be some spacers that came with the case (they are hex shaped, about 1/4 inch long with a screw on one end and a socket to receive another screw on the other end, they may be pre-installed in the case). Line up the motherboard in the case so that the back panel fits in the appropriate place and locate the holes in the motherboard - they should line up with holes in the tray beneath. Screw spacers into the tray everywhere the holes line up, and make sure there are no spacers that do not line up with holes in the motherboard (there are seven mounting points on your MB that I can see). Position the MB on the tray, lining it up over the spacers, and screw the MB in place (probably using the screws from pic #2 in your post - just make sure they fit properly). You want the board secured tightly to the case; it should have no "wiggle room".

Once you have the MB installed in the case, you can begin connecting wires and such. The manual for the MB has diagrams for the placement of each cable. The HDD/reset/power cables do indeed plug in where you think they do - look in the manual for specifics. The USB cable plugs into one of the pin sets with a yellow background labeled USB1/2/3 (it doesn't matter which you use). The 1394 cable is for the FireWire port, but I don't think the Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3L has a FireWire controller, so you won't be plugging that one in anywhere. Either the HD_Audio or AC97 cable gets plugged into the pins labled F_AUDIO, which are behind the audio ports on the back panel, right above the topmost PCI express slot (I don't know where the other one would go, I've never seen a case that came with both - check the case manual to see if it explains the difference between them).

Well, hopefully that helped and didn't just serve to make things more confusing.
February 26, 2008 3:57:15 AM

I shudder to see someone working on a computer on a carpet. It is an unnecessary static electricity risk. I hope you just laid it out there to photograph it... It'll probly be okay but why risk it?

Evan
February 26, 2008 4:09:13 AM

I shuddered as well.

ajsellaroli, Put the gun down.

First, get that thing off the carpet. Do it in the kitchen, or at least on a table.

Second, read the manual from front to back. All of the questions about the connections are in there in great detail, including pictures.
February 26, 2008 4:12:54 AM

Evan the Terrible said:
I shudder to see someone working on a computer on a carpet. It is an unnecessary static electricity risk. I hope you just laid it out there to photograph it... It'll probly be okay but why risk it?

Evan

I saw that too.....or use a antistatic wrist strap.....or keep one hand on unpainted steel.

February 26, 2008 5:08:29 AM

UUHHHH.......Nooo, Of CoURse I wasn't building my computer on the carpet..Who would be so foolish? I mean....*shoves parts onto the kitchen floor*

Seriously though, thanks for the advice..I didn't know that about carpet. I did make sure to ground myself constantly though, and before I touched anything important.

Hey, All of your comments were great, I understand alot more now. Does anybody know what those long screws are for though? Oh, and do those washers go on top of the motherboard, or beneath the motherboard? I mean, do they go between the standoff and the mobo or the screw and the mobo?


And what are the two #5 screws for?
February 26, 2008 6:57:08 AM

ajsellaroli said:
Oh, and do those washers go on top of the motherboard, or beneath the motherboard? I mean, do they go between the standoff and the mobo or the screw and the mobo?
Both. didnt you read the link in my first note?

This is taken directly from the page I linked to:
Metalized holes are meant to be directly screwed. So, on these holes go ahead and place a screw on them. But the non-metalized holes you cannot screw them directly. You need to place a cardboard washer between them and the screws. Actually, two washers are needed per hole, one between the nut and the motherboard and another between the motherboard and the screw, like a sandwich where the motherboard is the stuffing.

And here is the link again:

CLICK ME
February 26, 2008 7:10:13 AM

Dang dude, what camera did you use to take those pictures? Your focus is very nice. Long screw...hmmmm...could be for HDD if you use a smaller HDD. I have the same case as you, the gigabyte uses HD Audio, but in my experience, it didnt matter (use HD Audio anyway).

The #5 might involve the drive cages once again, or perhaps for mounting a fan, I might have used them for that purpose, not sure though.

#8 can either be used to fasten cards in, or screw into the mobo standoffs. I'm pretty sure those are standoff screws though, the hexagonal ones work better for holding those nifty gfx cards or w/e else you have in there in place.
February 26, 2008 2:51:43 PM

That mobo doesn't use the washers, save them. Ignore any screws that you don't know what they fit. Everything uses short screws, that I can think of off the top of my head. Do not drive a long screw into the HD or you will damage it. I have no idea why they gave you 24 long screws. The mobo may come with screws to mount it. Be sure that the pins on the heatsink are firmly seated, check the back of the mobo. Make sure that all 9 of the brass standoffs are in the case, one for each mounting hole on the mobo.
February 26, 2008 8:14:56 PM

The long screws are for mounting 3.5" drives in 5.25" bays. In my antec 900 case (at least) you need to screw in from outside of the 5" bay. They are just long enough to reach the 3.5" drive.

Evan
February 26, 2008 9:21:05 PM

Interesting, if not a little scary.
February 26, 2008 9:53:57 PM

ajsellaroli said:
Does anybody know what those long screws are for though? Oh, and do those washers go on top of the motherboard, or beneath the motherboard? I mean, do they go between the standoff and the mobo or the screw and the mobo?

Like HamRadio said, Long screws go with the standoff.

Washers go between standoff and motherboard. At least that's how I'd do it. logic behind it, You have visual at the top but don't see if your board is getting scratch or touching something underneath.

Quote:
And what are the two #5 screws for?

Two long screw I believe is for a fan, but could be for something ealse.
If your motherboard is in the case and ferm then what ever left are extras.

eric54 said:
Dang dude, what camera did you use to take those pictures?

He uses Canon Rebel Xti.
February 26, 2008 10:09:25 PM

get off the carpet man, or be prepared for static with a wrist strap
February 26, 2008 10:15:02 PM

rexter said:
Like HamRadio said, Long screws go with the standoff.
I think I said the short screws go with the standoffs.

Pictures are really nice. How do you know it is a Canon Rebel Xti?
February 26, 2008 11:10:32 PM

HamRadio said:
I think I said the short screws go with the standoffs.

Pictures are really nice. How do you know it is a Canon Rebel Xti?


The info is embedded in the picture information:

Camera
Make Canon
Model Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
X resolution 72/1
Y resolution 72/1
Resolution unit inches
Software Picasa 3.0
Date/time 25/02/2008 06:59:35 a.m.
YCbCr positioning co-sited
Image
Image description
Artist
Copyright
Exposure time 1/100 s
F-number f/10
Exposure program Manual
ISO speed ratings ISO 1600
Date/time original 25/02/2008 06:59:35 a.m.
Date/time digitized 25/02/2008 06:59:35 a.m.
Component config YCbCr
Shutter speed value 1/100 s
Aperture value f/10
Exposure bias value 0.00 eV
Metering mode Pattern
Flash Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
Focal length 55 mm
User comment
Colorspace Uncalibrated
Pixel X dimension 700
Pixel Y dimension 377
Focal plane X res. 3888000/877
Focal plane Y res. 2592000/582
Focal plane res. unit inch
Custom Rendered Normal process
Exposure mode Manual exposure
White balance Manual white balance
Scene capture type Standard
Image unique ID 565bccb75aed75207653c67a5ea7da3b
Miscellaneous
Exif version 2.21
FlashPix version 1.0
White balance Flash
Flash bias 0.00 EV
Canon Maker Notes
Macro mode Normal
Flash mode Flash not fired
Continuous drive mode Single
Focus mode AI Servo
Image size Large
Easy shooting mode Manual
Contrast Normal
Saturation Normal
Sharpness Unknown
ISO Unknown
Metering mode Evaluative
AF point selected Unknown
Exposure mode Manual
White balance Flash
Flash bias 0.00 EV
Image type Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
Firmware version Firmware 1.1.1
Owner name unknown
Camera serial number 6FB2-06C8C
February 26, 2008 11:13:35 PM

Stop what you are doing. Put it all back in the boxes as best you can and take it to someone who can put it together for you. I recomend finding a "hole-in-the-wall" computer store. Go local. Do not take that to best buy because they would have it all messed up. Nice pics, though.
February 26, 2008 11:34:20 PM

colonelblake said:
I saw that too.....or use a antistatic wrist strap.....or keep one hand on unpainted steel.


There is still a part of me that is stuck in third grade and can't help but crack a smile at the thought of keeping one hand on unpainted steel. :lol: 
February 26, 2008 11:59:01 PM

Evan the Terrible said:
I shudder to see someone working on a computer on a carpet. It is an unnecessary static electricity risk. I hope you just laid it out there to photograph it... It'll probly be okay but why risk it?

Evan

Pfft! I build all my PCs on nylon carpet, without any anti-static wristbands or other novelties.
February 27, 2008 1:49:20 AM

LOL I find it really funny you guys keep talking about my pictures, but I'm glad you like them :D  And yes, as Mula Terca so skillfully discovered, I shoot with a canon rebel XTi and love it. I started out shooting about 3 yrs ago (sophomore yr of High school). Ever since I shot pretty much nothing but nature. Now, though, I'm a freshman in college, and am on my college newspaper. In fact, this is the first semester I've been on the newspaper, and the first issue of the newspaper that came out since I've been apart of it has 2 of my photos in it! I'm pretty excited, the newspaper was actually just distributed today, so its been on my mind lately :D .

Evan, I have the Antec 900, so I guess that I know what the long screws are for now, thanks.
Hairycat - I want to build it myself, I need the experience. If I give up now, and just let somebody else do it for me, where would that put me for the future? If I wanted to upgrade the smallest thing, I'd have to get somebody else to do it for me. That's not what I want, I want to learn. I guess I'll just keep having to creating Photographically Enhanced Self Help Threads, if that's alright with you guys? lol

thank you all so much for the help thus far, I feel way better about what I'm doing. I'll keep you posted on my progress (trust me..I will need more help :D )
February 27, 2008 2:44:00 AM

I put the washers on top. To my knowledge the currents run on top. This is why most of the heavy duty soldering is on the back of the board. Circuit boards are only etched on one side and that would be the top in a motherboards case.
February 27, 2008 3:42:31 AM

aj, you're cracking me up ...

You should have all the info in your manuals.
February 27, 2008 4:19:01 AM

The manual probably dont have pictures though. LMAO.
February 27, 2008 9:05:39 AM

roadrunner197069 said:
I put the washers on top. To my knowledge the currents run on top. This is why most of the heavy duty soldering is on the back of the board. Circuit boards are only etched on one side and that would be the top in a motherboards case.
Uh, no.
February 27, 2008 1:21:44 PM

Zorg said:
Uh, no.


Um yes. You need to know smoething before you flap your jaw. Time do do some research for you.

If the back of the mother board is so importand why arent all of the small components soldered on the back?

Now I will educate you. Watch some of these videos and you will understand Daniel Son. This is how you make a circuit board. http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=pcb+board&s...
February 27, 2008 1:44:02 PM

Alright AJ. Where are you in your build now? And I wasn't trying to make you give up on the idea of building your own machine as much as I was trying to save your parts from an inexperienced builder. That didn't come out as nice as I wanted... Anyways, is the MoBo in place? Are you up and running. Have you read every manual that came with the stuff?
February 27, 2008 4:07:13 PM

the washers go on both sides of the board, and are only used on non conductive holes (the ones without the o-shaped silver connectors around the holes).

the ones with the o-shaped silver connectors want to be in direct contact with the screw/standoff so as to ground the mobo to the case.
February 27, 2008 6:08:20 PM

[hijack]

roadrunner197069 said:
I put the washers on top. To my knowledge the currents run on top. This is why most of the heavy duty soldering is on the back of the board. Circuit boards are only etched on one side and that would be the top in a motherboards case.
Zorg said:
Uh, no.
roadrunner197069 said:
Um yes. You need to know smoething before you flap your jaw. Time do do some research for you.

If the back of the mother board is so importand why arent all of the small components soldered on the back?

Now I will educate you. Watch some of these videos and you will understand Daniel Son. This is how you make a circuit board. http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=pcb+board&s...
A little pissy aren't we. First, PC mobos are multilayer PCBs. Second, the traces can be on both sides of each layer. Third, the solder is there to connect the components to the traces. Look at a mobo and notice how some components are surface mount tech and some use the older through-hole tech. So I will reiterate, WTF? Additionally, here is a scan of the bottom of a socket 478 mobo. We could argue all day about which side of the mobo, top or bottom, has the most traces, but I think it's the bottom. Grab a mobo and see for yourself.

Edit: I did some research on point two. Oversimplified, here is the the way it works. The layers are the traces. The inner two layers are on each side like a standard two sided PCB. The outer layers are etched on one side and then they are all laminated together. I was a bit cloudy on that.



[/hijack]
February 27, 2008 7:15:56 PM

^Agreed. All motherboard PCB designs these days are multi layered.
February 28, 2008 6:08:25 AM

As most of the stuff were covered by other people the time I posted my first comment, I did fail to clarify things are.

So for some who still doesn't know.


#1 Well, there are THESE ONES: (there are 4 of them total): - are for Expansion Cards.



#2 Then there are THESE ONES (there are 12 of them total): - are for Motherboard. Most computer case includes their standoff.



#3 Then there are THESE ONES (there are 24 of them total): - are for the fans.
My mistake earlier, 'that those long screws are for motherboard with standoff, but I realize they are too long.



#4 Then there are THESE washers (there are 8 of them total): - are for motherboard. There's really no right or wrong on which side of the board it goes but it was design that goes top of the board not bottom.



#5 Then there are THESE (2 of them total): - It looks pointy so either for heatsink or a fan.



#6 Then there are THESE (8 of them total): - are for hard drives.
February 28, 2008 3:07:33 PM

#1, 2 & 6 are virtually the same and can be interchanged, unless the threads are smaller, then obviously they would fit drives with the smaller screw holes. Throw the pointy wood screws and the long screws in the trash.
February 28, 2008 5:15:00 PM

I don't think AJ is still reading this thread...
February 28, 2008 8:40:18 PM

Just in case AJ the base note writer is out there reading this thread, is this your camera and is this the right lens?

Canon Digital Rebel XTi 10.1MP Digital SLR Camera with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 Lens (Black)

It has nice reviews and your pictures are great.. was going to start a new hobby..

also what software do you use for editing? photoshop seems expensive, is that the best one to get?

any other things you would suggest? maybe photography for dummies?

how's your build going? send more pictures :) 
February 28, 2008 8:50:19 PM

Evan the Terrible said:
I shudder to see someone working on a computer on a carpet. It is an unnecessary static electricity risk. I hope you just laid it out there to photograph it... It'll probly be okay but why risk it?

Evan


Thats an old wifes tale LOL. You have the same chances of getting struck by lightning in your living room as you do shorting out your hardware on a carpet.
February 28, 2008 8:52:05 PM

OP,

Dont waste your time with that duct fan. Install it on the side cover. Its a waste on the HD bay all together. It will most likely ether over or under rpm the case fan for that bay and it does not help increase airflow nearly as much as the side cover mount.
February 28, 2008 9:34:53 PM

have built dozens of systems for myself and friends, always been on carpet, never had a problem. I just take my shoes and socks off, touch the case before handling components, and keep the cats in the other room. I also make a point of not touching the butter knives I have stuck in my electrical sockets (thos are just to keep guests on their toes, anyway).
February 28, 2008 9:39:25 PM

OMG the rug!
I read all the way to the bottom and all I can think about is that rug. Generally I think wrist bands are silly(just be careful)…. But in this case I think ajsellarol should wear a rubber suit.
February 28, 2008 10:13:47 PM

ajsellaroli said:
LOL I find it really funny you guys keep talking about my pictures, but I'm glad you like them :D  And yes, as Mula Terca so skillfully discovered, I shoot with a canon rebel XTi and love it. I started out shooting about 3 yrs ago (sophomore yr of High school). Ever since I shot pretty much nothing but nature. Now, though, I'm a freshman in college, and am on my college newspaper. In fact, this is the first semester I've been on the newspaper, and the first issue of the newspaper that came out since I've been apart of it has 2 of my photos in it! I'm pretty excited, the newspaper was actually just distributed today, so its been on my mind lately :D .


Yes I'm still reading this thread. I guess you didn't see my previous post (quoted above) responding to some others' questions on my camera, but there it is. To answer your question personally, HamRadio yah it is the rebel xti, and that is my lens (it actually came with the camera). I bought it from costco for $700 with a free printer, it was a really good deal, it might still be on I don't know. As far as book recommendations go, I wouldn't really know where to send you there, I first got into it through a hs class. However, the class didn't tell me half of what I know now about photography. Where I really learned ALOT was at this website called photo.net. I wore those guys out, asking so many questions in the forums. They also have lots of great guides you can use. I'm not really into computer hardware photography lol, I actually enjoyed nature photography when I first started, and am now getting into Photojournalism. I'm still glad you liked the photos though. I use photoshop at my school, but not extensively. The program I would actually recommend is Adobe Lightroom. I've used it a few times and loved it, it is alot cheaper than photoshop, and it is made specifically for photographers.

I hope all that helped somehow, and I will post more pictures later today (I haven't had any more time to build lately due to school)
February 29, 2008 3:20:48 PM

grieve said:
OMG the rug!
I read all the way to the bottom and all I can think about is that rug. Generally I think wrist bands are silly(just be careful)…. But in this case I think ajsellarol should wear a rubber suit.


Yes AJ, you should wear a rubber. :pt1cable: 
March 5, 2008 3:29:01 AM

Hey guys, I need some help again. I finally got some time tonight to try to put my computer together again, and I ran into some problems. I got the 7 standoffs into the board ok, but it was the I/O plate (I think that's what you call it) that gave me some problems.



It didn't seem to fit onto the board right. The holes are in the right places, but it didn't go flush with the ports, there were these little metal tabs sticking out that seemed to keep the motherboard from lining up correctly with the ports. Am I supposed to break these off or something?



Once again, thanks for your help
March 5, 2008 12:44:31 PM

I dunno if it was covered, but as far as connecitng the Power and Reset switch goes, look into the motherboards instruction booklet, and it hsould have a labled diagram. Like the title of the thread though... Pesh PESHT. :) 
March 5, 2008 3:28:09 PM

Lol pesh, that is pretty darn close. How'd you come up with the name pesh?

Oh, and..any ideas on what to do to get that I/O plate snuggly fitted with my motherboard?
March 5, 2008 4:08:08 PM

Break off any covers that are covering outputs on the rear I/O of the mobo. Are you sure about 7 standoffs. I can't tell what mobo/case, but be sure that there aren't 9 standoffs.
March 5, 2008 5:05:46 PM

There aren't any covers covering the outputs, there are just those little tabs pictured in the second photo there. Those tabs keep the i/o panel from being pressed right up against the motherboards connectors. Am I just supposed to press these little 'tabs' flat?
March 5, 2008 5:27:38 PM

Yes, use a mild pressure and push the mobo I/O against the shield. Those tangs should press against the outside of the parallel port etc.
March 5, 2008 9:22:43 PM

oh ok..so don't break them off? thanks
March 5, 2008 9:54:06 PM

Zorg said:
Yes, use a mild pressure and push the mobo I/O against the shield. Those tangs should press against the outside of the parallel port etc.

As Zorg said...

The little "lip" is what keeps the IO plate attached.
Also, you may want to attach the IO plate before placing the MB into the case.

Someone else mentioned to break off something... they were referring to the case itself; should any of the openings be covered with a temporary piece of plastic/metal.... you remove those to make room for the MB/IO plate.
March 5, 2008 9:55:13 PM

Dude... didnt you play with Lego as a kid? :) 
!