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Windows XP Installation Error

Last response: in Windows XP
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July 23, 2010 12:57:07 AM

Hey all,


Alright, so my desktop has decided to reject two Windows OS in the last few days, Windows 7 and XP. Originally on my first harddrive, I have Windows 7 installed, but after letting the computer go to sleep for a bit while I worked out, I came back and have found that the internet no longer works (It says I am still connected, and I can see the other computers on my network, as I am living in a dorm building, but when I try and access the internet through Firefox or IE, it gives me a DNS error'). After doing a bit of research on this problem, I don't believe I can fix it seeing as how I'm on a school network as I am. I have a second 500GB HDD in my tower, which I installed Windows 7 onto as well, but have found that the same problem exists, on a fresh install of the OS and a brand new HDD.

Now, for why I'm posting this in the XP section. I also own a copy of XP 32-bit and 64-bit. After getting the same error, I go back, reformat the HDD, and attempt to install XP 32-bit. Installation goes fine until it reboots, coming up with "A disk read error occurred, Press CTRL+ALT+DEL to restart, along with several colored boxes scattered across the screen, containing random symbols. I try rebooting from the HDD instead of the CD, I try reinstalling with both 32-bit and 64-bit, all the no avail, I keep getting the same error over and over again. Now, quick note, all of these copies of Windows OS's are legitimate, and they have all worked before as I have at one point or another, used them on different computers. There should be nothing wrong with my 500GB HDD, nor the cables as like I said, Windows 7 was successfully installed and ran with no problems (other than the DNS error). If you need my computer specs, I can post them as well. As for my Windows 7 problem, if anyone could provide a potential error for that as well, that'd be fantastic, as all the questions I've seen about it before have been if the person's PC was on their own private network with access to their own private router. Thanks for any and all help.

- Matt
July 23, 2010 2:53:25 AM

Jarkeler said:
Hey all,


Alright, so my desktop has decided to reject two Windows OS in the last few days, Windows 7 and XP. Originally on my first harddrive, I have Windows 7 installed, but after letting the computer go to sleep for a bit while I worked out, I came back and have found that the internet no longer works (It says I am still connected, and I can see the other computers on my network, as I am living in a dorm building, but when I try and access the internet through Firefox or IE, it gives me a DNS error'). After doing a bit of research on this problem, I don't believe I can fix it seeing as how I'm on a school network as I am. I have a second 500GB HDD in my tower, which I installed Windows 7 onto as well, but have found that the same problem exists, on a fresh install of the OS and a brand new HDD.

- Matt


Did you check your network properties (TCP/IP) to see if you have automatic IP and DNS enabled? Do you have "Automatically detect settings" enabled? (Control Panel>Internet Options>Connections>Lan Settings)

Jarkeler said:
Hey all,

Now, for why I'm posting this in the XP section. I also own a copy of XP 32-bit and 64-bit. After getting the same error, I go back, reformat the HDD, and attempt to install XP 32-bit. Installation goes fine until it reboots, coming up with "A disk read error occurred, Press CTRL+ALT+DEL to restart, along with several colored boxes scattered across the screen, containing random symbols. I try rebooting from the HDD instead of the CD, I try reinstalling with both 32-bit and 64-bit, all the no avail, I keep getting the same error over and over again. Now, quick note, all of these copies of Windows OS's are legitimate, and they have all worked before as I have at one point or another, used them on different computers. There should be nothing wrong with my 500GB HDD, nor the cables as like I said, Windows 7 was successfully installed and ran with no problems (other than the DNS error). If you need my computer specs, I can post them as well. As for my Windows 7 problem, if anyone could provide a potential error for that as well, that'd be fantastic, as all the questions I've seen about it before have been if the person's PC was on their own private network with access to their own private router. Thanks for any and all help.

- Matt


If it were my machine, I'd make sure every plug-in board was seated properly. Since you obviously have access to another computer, look up the correct voltage for your memory,(go to places that sell it, they'll say what voltage it runs at). I'd be doing the long format, you know, the type that takes many hours to complete. Then I'd start over installing Windows. If you have a PCIe video card, make sure your XP CD has SP2 built-in. That's it. Someone else may do things differently, but this is what I'd do first.
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July 23, 2010 5:27:26 AM

Thanks for the quick reply Tigsounds. As for your first statement, yes I have made sure those functions are enabled. As for your second, I have opened my case (quite often over the last year because of different hardware problems), and everything is as it should be. My XP discs do have SP2 already built in as well. I'll try re-installing XP with the NTFS longer formatting, I just hating doing that because of the long time it takes. Other than that, I'm not sure of what else to do. Like I said, these versions of XP have worked in the past (in fact both of them being on this same machine before not all that long ago), and the machine is currently working with Windows 7 (with the exception of the DNS error).
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July 23, 2010 5:47:54 AM

The reason for the long format is to get the bad sector map updated.
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July 23, 2010 12:22:40 PM

tigsounds said:
The reason for the long format is to get the bad sector map updated.




Well yes, I know that. It doesn't make me like how long it takes any more however :p 

And like I said, the HDD was working fine with Windows 7 yesterday morning.
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July 23, 2010 6:56:36 PM

Is the drive formated as NTSF or FAT32?
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July 24, 2010 12:18:34 AM

lazyperson17 said:
Is the drive formated as NTSF or FAT32?



NTSF.
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July 24, 2010 12:21:03 AM

Do you have multiple drives?

Check in the BIOS and see if the Hard Drive is the primary Boot Device. (let us know if you need steps for checking this)
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July 24, 2010 3:14:29 AM

lazyperson17 said:
Do you have multiple drives?

Check in the BIOS and see if the Hard Drive is the primary Boot Device. (let us know if you need steps for checking this)




Would you please give me the steps? I've never messed around with my BIOS before.
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July 24, 2010 9:50:14 AM

yeah that happened to me and i did the long format and it worked =/ i dunno if this will help you
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July 24, 2010 7:17:49 PM

for me to give detailed steps, could you please tell me what motherboard (or if you have a prebuilt computer, what company)


Sorry, it varies slightly depending on these things, and i want to make sure when i give you steps, it takes you EXACTLY where you need to be.

Thanks!
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July 25, 2010 5:05:19 PM

Sorry, should have thought of that when I asked you for the steps. I have an ASUS P5N-E SLI board.


And I'm currently waiting on the long formatting process to finish, to see if that fixes the installation process. I'll let ya'll know if it does or not.

**Nope, after the long format, I still get the same error.
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July 26, 2010 4:46:26 PM

OK, First lets see about getting you set up for whats what. When i need to figure out what drive holds the Primary OS (operating system, i usually unplug the other "slave" drives so that the only one that my BIOS can see is the Primary "Master". This removes any accidental reformatting of a drive you dont want to format. To figure out which one is the correct one, i usually start by unplugging all but one, and then see if the computer boots normally. If it does, the one thats plugged in is the one containing the OS (Operating System) (which is the one you want plugged in. OR, if you do not care, or do not have a drive containing an OS, continue reading as tho it was a blank Hard Drive instead of the one "containing the OS"

After you have found the "Master" drive, turn on your computer and begin to hit the F2 key repeatedly until the BIOS menu shows up. (it may be delete on your computer, but as its first booting up, it will tell you so pay attention and act fast.) If you mis it the first time, its ok, just restart the computer and before the screen even turns on, begin to hit that F2 or Delete key repeatedly until you get into the BIOS... Then stop :) 

Once there, after looking up you Motherboard, it appears that the list and order of the drives are on two different tabs, the "Main" page, and "BOOT" page, as seen in this next link.

http://techgage.com/viewimg/?img=/reviews/asus/p5ne_sli...

Use the arrow keys to navigate through the BIOS to select the "BOOT" page. Under the boot page, you will probably see "Primary Boot Device" (or similar) then "Secondary Boot Device" (or similar).

Make sure that you select the only Hard Drive listed (which you discovered to be the one holding the OS) as the "Primary BOOT Device".

Once you have selected the Drive containing the OS (or drive of your choice) as the primary boot device. Hit the F10 Key. If you are then prompted by a "Would you like to Save Y/N" type the letter "Y" (if not already selected) and then hit ENTER on your keyboard.

Once you have done that, it will restart.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Usually to install any Operating system, the computer/Operating system will want you to boot from the Disc Drive. This is as simple as repeating the above steps (which after you do them a couple of times are get very easy to do) but instead of selecting your Hard Drive, you select your DVD/CD Drive. (Just make sure that when you do this, your Hard Drive IS STILL PLUGGED IN to the computer, otherwise the Windows Operating system will not have anything to install Windows XP to...

Hope this helps! Let me know if you need clarification or If it doesnt work and we will go to the next steps :) 
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July 26, 2010 5:00:30 PM

Yes, I have already performed those steps. I have had numerous errors with this PC and previous HDD's, however before me and a friend have been able to solve them on our own. However, this error goes beyond me as to why a HDD would allow Windows 7 to be installed on it, but not XP 32-bit or 64-bit. Sorry about asking for these steps to the BIOS menu, I must have had a brainfart when I made that post asking what they were. :p 

(I am by no means computer-illiterate, I am just nearly as technically-oriented as many of you here, hence my posting of my PC error.)
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July 26, 2010 5:04:20 PM

The only thing i can think of that you havent done, is get a new XP CD. It seems that there is something wrong with the CD before (ive had trouble with both XP and Vista CD's)

If theres any chance for you to get another XP CD... it could very possibly solve the problem (unless you already did and im just forgetting it from a previous post)
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July 26, 2010 6:23:41 PM

Alright. It just seems so random that both of my XP CD's, both of which I've used before, and are both in fine condition (i.e. no scratches or anything), would both stop working at the same time.
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July 26, 2010 6:28:19 PM

yea, i hear ya. One thing that i just thought of. Do the XP discs have SP1,2, or 3?
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July 26, 2010 8:58:01 PM

They both have SP2 on them.
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July 26, 2010 9:20:30 PM

do you have a floppy drive?
(odd question, but the answer will help me decide the next step)
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July 26, 2010 9:47:35 PM

Nope, no floppy drive.
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July 26, 2010 9:52:29 PM

honestly, im at a loss for trying more fixes. The reason for asking about the floppy drive is that i dont know that all of the Windows Service packs carry drivers for SATA hard drives (SP3 and Vista and Win 7 do, and ive been told SP2 does).

But you might want to check out the following link which allows Windows 7 to act as Windows XP:

http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtual-pc/download.as...
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July 26, 2010 11:49:10 PM

Alright, well thanks for the help that you were able to provide. Perhaps someone else may be able to solve this issue.
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July 27, 2010 12:55:25 AM

There is this thing called SATA and then there's SATA-II. The difference is how fast the data transfer speed is on the two different types.

Many new SATA-II hard drives have a jumper that will limit the speed to 1.5Gb/s to keep them compatible with the slower SATA drive controllers. Perhaps you have a SATA-II drive operating on a SATA controller, and it is unable to synchronize transfer speed correctly?

Windows 7 may be able to detect this error and adjust itself (nobody knows the capabilities of Windows 7 but Microsoft, so far)
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July 27, 2010 4:57:41 PM

tigsounds said:
There is this thing called SATA and then there's SATA-II. The difference is how fast the data transfer speed is on the two different types.

Many new SATA-II hard drives have a jumper that will limit the speed to 1.5Gb/s to keep them compatible with the slower SATA drive controllers. Perhaps you have a SATA-II drive operating on a SATA controller, and it is unable to synchronize transfer speed correctly?

Windows 7 may be able to detect this error and adjust itself (nobody knows the capabilities of Windows 7 but Microsoft, so far)




I don't think that's the case. My mobo is said that it supports SATA II, and when I dugout the box for my second HDD, a Seagate Barracuda, it says that it is a SATA drive, not SATA II. I have tried using both the my original SATA cable, and the SATA cable that came with my newer HDD, both to no avail.
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July 31, 2010 6:01:49 PM

Bump, any other possible solutions anyone can think of besides a new XP CD? Would really like to figure out a solution, seeing as how my desktop (which is my gaming computer as well) is just being used for movies and music now.
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!