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GeForce 8800GTX: activate DVD decoding

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March 17, 2008 6:17:16 PM

Hi all!! :pt1cable: 

I have an Asus Nvidia GeForce 8800GTX 768 Mo PCI Express on Windows Vista 64 Ultimate.
I heard there is hardware DVD decoding inside this card.
But how can I activate DVD decoding from this card in Windows (in players like Windows Media Player, Windows Media Center, BsPlayer, Gom Player, FFdshow, etc)?

Thanks!!

Dave
a b Î Nvidia
March 17, 2008 6:31:42 PM

Stick in a DVD and play it. That's how you activate it. It is all done when it is played from any player. My first DVD player in my computer was $300 and came with a decoder card. You plugged your video card output into the input of the card and then your monitor into the decoder card. When you played a video it played the DVD piece for the card. You are basically getting this card as part of your normal video card.

Lets say you play a dvd from your media player on your card, you might see 20% CPU utilization. If you replaced your card with one that does not have decoding in the same senerio it might take 80-90% CPU utilization.
March 17, 2008 7:34:08 PM

I tired to play a DVD recently on my wife's machine (8800GTX) and it said there was no codec, and then when I installed one it said there were security issues.

Had no problems on my machine (same 8800GTX and DVD Drive different mobo tho) What a hassle.
Related resources
a b Î Nvidia
March 17, 2008 9:53:03 PM

was it a "hollywood" dvd or was it a burned one? You still need software to play the DVD. The Video card won't magically just play it for you. You must have had a DVD player of some kind on your machine and not hers. Maybe it was an older version of media player?
March 18, 2008 2:56:31 PM

Well I have a small proggie called "Vista MediaCenter Decoder Utility" and it says the only DVD codec used is "Microsoft MPEG2 video decoder", and there's no other choice in the drop downs.
I guess the Nvidia decoders should appear here, but how?
March 18, 2008 4:02:10 PM

You'll have to install another codec, do a search online, I had found one not long ago that was free. It would let you do what your wanting if you want to play hollywood movies, at least in windows xp. Just do a google search, you should come up with something.
March 18, 2008 4:49:54 PM

mordenkhai said:
I tired to play a DVD recently on my wife's machine (8800GTX) and it said there was no codec, and then when I installed one it said there were security issues.

Had no problems on my machine (same 8800GTX and DVD Drive different mobo tho) What a hassle.


Only Vista Ultimate can play dvd's straight out of the box. It comes with a dvd codec built-in. If your wife's machine is running any other version of windows, you have to either install dvd playback software, or find a codec to install. unfortunately, i run vista ultimate so i don't know of any codecs for you to download.
Anonymous
March 18, 2008 5:25:02 PM

klite codec mega pack. do it.
March 18, 2008 6:08:23 PM

do a quick download of VLC Player. It will play almost any file or dvd without needing to install any codec packs which personally tend to ruin a system.
March 18, 2008 8:21:28 PM

Media Player Classic is one that use.
March 18, 2008 10:02:46 PM

rockbyter said:
do a quick download of VLC Player. It will play almost any file or dvd without needing to install any codec packs which personally tend to ruin a system.



2nd the VLC Player.
A lightweight program that does not disappoint.
March 18, 2008 10:47:38 PM

^Agreed. VCL Player is one of the best, heck I haven't used Media Player(excluding Web embeded) since i found out about VCL.
a b Î Nvidia
March 18, 2008 11:55:45 PM

To get DVD acceleration you just need to enable hardware acceleration(sometimes called DXVA) in your media player of choice.
Nvidia's DVD acceleration is not quite as hardware based as ATI. so it uses more cpu power, but not enough to worry about.

Also turn on "Inverse Telecine" in the Nvidia control panel

Windows Media Player(Should be on by default)
=>Tools
=>Options
=>Performance
=>Turn on DirectX Video Acceleration(check it)

PowerDVD
=>Config(CTRL+C)
=>Video
=>Enable Hardware Acceleration(check it)

Now for the codec. MPEG2 is the video format used on DVD's by default there is not a codec(Coder-Decoder) installed for it. This is normally obtained with the software that comes with your DVD drive. PowerDVD,WinDVD ect. once you install a DVD playing software other players will use that codec to run the video(DVD and other mpeg2 stuff).

As said VLC will play DVD's and almost any file in the world without codecs. it has its own built in. For DVD's you may have to enable de-interlacing(Blend or bob in most cases) of some kind to avoid seeing both fields at once on a DVD. This is where PowerDVD shines. i does a damn good job of it.

I do not recommend codec packs as they install so many codecs they can conflict. I have DivX Pro(they gave it away for a while as a promo), Xvid(already had it, not that i need it with DivX) and AC3 filter(For some AC3 sound). anything that does not play with those goes right into VLC.

Another good player in Media player classic, but thats another story....



EDIT

Playing DVD's on VLC does seem to auto de-interlace. Just mpeg 2 files on the hard drive need it set....so give er...
a b Î Nvidia
March 19, 2008 1:11:29 AM

I'm using PowerDVD right now as I'm typing this. The movie runs fine, the card is an 8800GTX, and CPU (stock Q6600) is between 1% and 3%. Hardware acceleration is unchecked and grayed in PowerDVD's config dialog box. I'm guessing that it's off but wouldn't make any difference anyway if I knew how to turn it on.
a b Î Nvidia
March 19, 2008 2:02:00 AM

its grayed out because you are watching a movie :p 
Stop the movie then go check it....i just find it does a better de-interlacing job and you can use the noise filter and edge enhance in the Nvidia Control Panel.

EDIT.........
for some things hardware off works better....some cartoons....not even sure why....

Quick test....hardware off vs on was only about 2% on average difference.....there was some time at 0 percent...but average was 1-2
March 19, 2008 3:24:12 AM

Hello all and thanks for the answer.
From what I understood, if I want to use the hardware dvd decoding ability of my Asus Nvidia GeForce 8800GTX , I need to use a DVD decoder called "Nvidia Purevideo". But I didn't get this decoder program with the Cdroms given with the card... So I guess I can't use hardware dvd decoding?
a b Î Nvidia
March 19, 2008 3:37:27 AM

Purevideo is just a video acceleration....the codec is unrelated.

Look in the control center....those 3 options are part of purevideo.

Did you give vlc a try. its so low on resources if will run on almost anything.
a b Î Nvidia
March 19, 2008 12:45:55 PM

nukemaster said:
its grayed out because you are watching a movie :p 
Stop the movie then go check it....i just find it does a better de-interlacing job and you can use the noise filter and edge enhance in the Nvidia Control Panel.

EDIT.........
for some things hardware off works better....some cartoons....not even sure why....

Quick test....hardware off vs on was only about 2% on average difference.....there was some time at 0 percent...but average was 1-2



LOL, I'm so embarrassed right now :lol:  Thanks for the tip! I'll give it a try tonight when I get home.
March 20, 2008 10:51:47 AM

Hello NukeMaster

I’m afraid you got it wrong, Purevideo is really a decoder, as you can see on this web page: http://www.nvidia.com/object/dvd_decoder_1.02-223-trial...

As far as what I’ve understood from web searches:
- Purevideo is the only decoder that would use the chips for hardware DVD decoding that are inside the Nvidia graphic cards.
- Purevideo should be a choice for DVD decoding that would work in any video player software.

Now my questions remain:
- Does my purchase of an Asus- Nvidia graphic card allow me to use Purevideo for free?
- Was Purevideo installed on my Windows during the installation of the graphic card driver? And how can I check this?
- How to make Purevideo the default DVD decoder in Windows?

About VLC player:
I have a lot of video playback software installed on my PC. I mainly use BsPlayer and Windows Media Center. When I cannot read a video in these 2, I go to Gom Player, Windows Media Player Classic or VLC Player.
I prefer players that use external codecs (like BsPlayer) than internal codecs (like Gom or VLC).
The reason is when an update is done on a codec (like Divx), you need to wait for the developers of the software to code the new version of their internal codecs. SO they have a lot of codecs to update, you can’t be sure their internal codec will be as good as the original one.
On top of that, VLC has a tedious interface while Windows Media Player has the best interface I have seen for video playback.
And with my 4 gigs of Ram, I’m OK with memory consumption 

See you,
Gz
a b Î Nvidia
March 20, 2008 6:27:42 PM

grendizer said:
Hello NukeMaster

I%u2019m afraid you got it wrong, Purevideo is really a decoder, as you can see on this web page: http://www.nvidia.com/object/dvd_decoder_1.02-223-trial...

As far as what I%u2019ve understood from web searches:
- Purevideo is the only decoder that would use the chips for hardware DVD decoding that are inside the Nvidia graphic cards.
- Purevideo should be a choice for DVD decoding that would work in any video player software.

Now my questions remain:
- Does my purchase of an Asus- Nvidia graphic card allow me to use Purevideo for free?
- Was Purevideo installed on my Windows during the installation of the graphic card driver? And how can I check this?
- How to make Purevideo the default DVD decoder in Windows?

About VLC player:
I have a lot of video playback software installed on my PC. I mainly use BsPlayer and Windows Media Center. When I cannot read a video in these 2, I go to Gom Player, Windows Media Player Classic or VLC Player.
I prefer players that use external codecs (like BsPlayer) than internal codecs (like Gom or VLC).
The reason is when an update is done on a codec (like Divx), you need to wait for the developers of the software to code the new version of their internal codecs. SO they have a lot of codecs to update, you can%u2019t be sure their internal codec will be as good as the original one.
On top of that, VLC has a tedious interface while Windows Media Player has the best interface I have seen for video playback.
And with my 4 gigs of Ram, I%u2019m OK with memory consumption %uF04A

See you,
Gz

Pure video is nothing but a hardware acceleration(it also deinterlaces and does color correction ect..as in the pic above, i already told you how to turn it on...). thats why its next to the hardware acceleration tab in power dvd in my picture. the decoder is still cyberlink.
The nvidia drivers come with the "free" purevideo(there is a pay one that decodes surround sound) but its not a decoder in this case but video acceleration...you need a 3rd party decoder such as cyberlink or winDVD or just use vlc.



Its kind of a pain that you ask a question, get and answer and say its wrong...i have NEVER seen a divx file that does not play in VLC since divx tries to be backwards compatible for the sake of hardware players.

Its not like video playback takes much ram anyway(WMP 25 megs to watch a dvd). so even if you had 512 you could still use media player or whatever you like. in fact entering this forum takes more ram them most video playback.
a b Î Nvidia
March 20, 2008 11:42:14 PM

Nukemaster, thanks again for the tip about hardware acceleration. I did manage to enable it, indeed, if I configured PowerDVD before loading a movie. Now the bad news is that with the acceleration on PowerDVD only gives me sound, no video, when it's running on the secondary monitor. It works fine on the primary monitor. Oh well, it's not like I really needed it, but it's fun to know I can have it. I turned it off, because I always watch my DVDs on the secondary monitor while doing other stuff on the primary.
a b Î Nvidia
March 21, 2008 3:05:53 AM

Unfortunately Nvidia had to take off the ability to do that as well as video mirroring due to some law to prevent coping of videos. Protected Video Path Output Content Protection. Its for vista but is built into the card.

If you ran in span mode as opposed to dual screens it would work, but then your start menu would go across both screens(Pain in the ass).

With you system its not needed and Cyberlink's deinterlacing(one main thing to do with hardware) is VERY good.
March 26, 2008 10:51:58 AM

Hi all,

Sorry for the message above. It seems the "post reply" button does not work, only "quick reply" works.

After a little bit of more web search and testing, I got the answers to my own questions.

Some days ago I bought a bluray drive and it came with Power DVD. In the options of PowerDVD > video tab > there is a check box for “enable hardware acceleration (Nvidia Purevideo). This means PowerDVD uses its own MPEG2/DVD decoder, with the “help” of the hardware acceleration of the graphic card, which is called “PureVideo”.
Also in Windows Vista’s Nvidia control panel, there are also some options for hardware acceleration.
But, on the web you can find references to an Nvidia DVD decoder called “NVIDIA DVD Decoder” that has been renamed to “NVIDIA PureVideo Decoder”!
http://www.cdr-zone.com/software/codecs/nvidia_purevide...
http://mediacenterexpert.blogspot.com/2006/07/vista-med...
From what I understood, this decoder is a full DVD decoder, providing video and sound decoding and that is just like any other DVD decoder that you can use in Windows. Unfortunately it is not free.
So the confusion comes from the fact that both things are called “Nvidia Purevideo decoder”. But this answers my questions.
Nukemaster, I acknowledge your expertise in the domain, but if you want to support Purevideo is not a DVD decoder, you will need to paste some web links that prove what you say…

Greetings
Gz
!