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Did I get a used E8400 processor from Newegg?

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April 12, 2008 7:02:30 AM

I just received my E8400 today :) 

The factory seal stickers were still on the box. Upon inspection of the heatspreader on the processor, I noticed scratch marks in a rectangular pattern. It looks like a heat sink was on top of the processor at some point.

Has anyone else noticed this?

Does Intel test each processor? Could this be from their testing?

I can't imagine that Newegg would send me a used chip and charge for a new one. This is why I buy from them and not other online stores.

I imagine that I'll just install the processor and see how it goes. No harm, no foul. I'm concerned though that I might get a chip that doesn't clock as high as I would like. Than I'd be constantly thinking about weather someone returned this chip or not. I realize however that I can't ethically return a chip that doesn't clock as high as I would like.

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April 12, 2008 8:00:51 AM

rickpatbrown said:
I just received my E8400 today :) 

The factory seal stickers were still on the box. Upon inspection of the heatspreader on the processor, I noticed scratch marks in a rectangular pattern. It looks like a heat sink was on top of the processor at some point.

Has anyone else noticed this?

Does Intel test each processor? Could this be from their testing?

I can't imagine that Newegg would send me a used chip and charge for a new one. This is why I buy from them and not other online stores.

I imagine that I'll just install the processor and see how it goes. No harm, no foul. I'm concerned though that I might get a chip that doesn't clock as high as I would like. Than I'd be constantly thinking about weather someone returned this chip or not. I realize however that I can't ethically return a chip that doesn't clock as high as I would like.


Post pics!
April 12, 2008 8:05:20 AM

I'm at work right now. I will.
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April 12, 2008 1:56:39 PM

That does look paculiar, maybe its just testing.
April 12, 2008 2:32:28 PM

Below the writing on my E8400 I noticed some scratches running from side to side,but it doesnt seem to affect my cpu.
April 12, 2008 2:37:00 PM

thats normal all cpu's have factory marks!
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April 12, 2008 2:46:39 PM

How do they print/engrave the text on the IHS, maybe those marks are side effect of that process...
April 12, 2008 2:47:53 PM

Lap it!! And when it shines, it will look bran Newwwwwww. :oops: 
April 12, 2008 2:56:15 PM

It should be from factory processing. Functional heatsinks don't have base that small. :p 
April 12, 2008 3:18:35 PM

rickpatbrown said:
I just received my E8400 today :) 

The factory seal stickers were still on the box. Upon inspection of the heatspreader on the processor, I noticed scratch marks in a rectangular pattern. It looks like a heat sink was on top of the processor at some point.
...


Looking at your pictures that is quite clearly the mark from the processor ID stamp...
You got to be kidding with the used CPU idea... Why would anyone install a heatsink the size of a postage stamp (Intel dual-core processor heatspreaders are already real small these days!!)

Or maybe not with all those other AMD fanboi threads about returning E8400's due to the fact they overheat - just kidding!!

Anyway it's time to rub all those score marks off 'n' lap it boi!! Just don't get it mixed up with an E2180 when it has a mirror surface!!

Bob
April 12, 2008 3:22:02 PM

Everyone is talking about lapping, but does it really make a difference? Wouldn't the thermal compound fill the creases anyway? Basically, is it really worth grinding your cpu, and, obviously, vioding warranty, since they can see it clearly? :p 
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April 12, 2008 3:27:15 PM

No. Do not bother.
April 12, 2008 3:33:26 PM

:oops: . o O (forgot to tag on... I'm against lapping. Those poor CPU's, getting skinned)

I'm getting great temps on my new Q6600. I have it OC at 2.8ghz right now, been running prime95 for about 4 hours. The CPU/HS are not lapped, and temps:

C0 - 47C
C1 - 47C
C2 - 46C
C3 - 46C

Just get your system together and see what it can do. :D 
April 12, 2008 3:42:12 PM

I'm not worried about the scratches She'll be liquid cooled. I'm worried about my overclock and some little kid in the stock room pulling a fast one on me. I figured they were from the factory. Thanks for the reasurance.
April 12, 2008 4:14:14 PM

The printing on cpu's are laser etched... no "hands on" needed there, markings must be from final testing before packaging.
April 12, 2008 4:14:55 PM

dagger said:
Everyone is talking about lapping, but does it really make a difference? Wouldn't the thermal compound fill the creases anyway? Basically, is it really worth grinding your cpu, and, obviously, vioding warranty, since they can see it clearly? :p 


Yes, yes, YES!! Even if you are watercooling the closer you get to a direct metal to metal bond the lower the temps. If you spread the Arctic MX2 or AS5 really thin on a lapped CPU/heatsink you really do get better thermal transfer and thus lower temperatures... Its just basic thermodynamics. The ideal would be a direct metal to metal bond with no airgaps at all - very hard to achieve in the real world - unfortunately!!

Bob
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April 12, 2008 10:26:26 PM

uk_gangsta said:
That does look paculiar, maybe its just testing.


totally normal - seen hundreds like that ;) 
April 12, 2008 10:50:36 PM

dagger said:
Everyone is talking about lapping, but does it really make a difference? Wouldn't the thermal compound fill the creases anyway? Basically, is it really worth grinding your cpu, and, obviously, vioding warranty, since they can see it clearly? :p 

It only matters to a few people and the real gain is next to nothing...some people even remove the IHS and run phase cooling dirrectly on the IC's/core's,but they are into OC contests.

Correct preinstall cleaning (even new parts) and correct TIM install along with case flow patterns is the key.
April 12, 2008 11:32:54 PM

dagger said:
Everyone is talking about lapping, but does it really make a difference? Wouldn't the thermal compound fill the creases anyway? Basically, is it really worth grinding your cpu, and, obviously, vioding warranty, since they can see it clearly? :p 


Heck yeah lap it! Lapping really works...my PC is living proof!
April 12, 2008 11:54:58 PM

hell yeah, lapping helps. I lapped my gpu, now my video screams
April 13, 2008 12:18:16 AM

What's the temp difference?
April 13, 2008 12:29:55 AM

i only ever lapped a 2500 Barton core a long long while ago. as for the posibility of damage... its a daft piece of metal stuck to your cpu, your not actually lapping the core here so why not? and jhust out of interest, have any of you ever had a fualty processor?? i'm yet to see a faulty one and i work in pc repair every day, its not a common fault
April 13, 2008 2:07:17 AM

lap that mofo
April 13, 2008 4:07:10 AM

Lapping does make a huge difference with some heatspreaders. I lapped my Opteron and it dropped about 8 degrees with air cooling.

I will have to see what my temps are before I think about lapping the E8400. From my understanding, the 45nm process will hit a wall before temperature is an issue. Lapping will shave off a couple of degrees, but at a certain point, it requires extreme cooling (liq. Nitrogen) to achieve a higher OC. Super cold equals less electrical resistance equals lower voltage required equals higher stable overclock.

In other words. I don't see the point when The proccessor hits a wall at 50 degrees on water. Getting it down to 48 degrees isn't going to get any more Mhz out of it.
April 13, 2008 10:14:28 AM

rickpatbrown said:
Lapping does make a huge difference with some heatspreaders. I lapped my Opteron and it dropped about 8 degrees with air cooling.

I will have to see what my temps are before I think about lapping the E8400. From my understanding, the 45nm process will hit a wall before temperature is an issue. Lapping will shave off a couple of degrees, but at a certain point, it requires extreme cooling (liq. Nitrogen) to achieve a higher OC. Super cold equals less electrical resistance equals lower voltage required equals higher stable overclock.

In other words. I don't see the point when The proccessor hits a wall at 50 degrees on water. Getting it down to 48 degrees isn't going to get any more Mhz out of it.


Yeh, like totally agree. Older processor heatspreaders (P4 socket 478 and Opterons/Athlon-64's) are uniformally concave on the top surface in my experience. It takes ages to lap the heatspreaders to 240 grit as they are so totally non-flat. The heatspreader actually has a massive gap right where you need best contact with the heatsink - i.e. over the actual physical CPU die which is in the middle.

Newer processors like the 45nm have less thermal issues from what I have read. Also certainly the 1x E2180 heatspreader I have lapped was very small and already practically flat anyway (65nm dual-core)...

Bob
April 13, 2008 1:44:07 PM

crazywheels said:
hell yeah, lapping helps. I lapped my gpu, now my video screams


:heink:  . o O (GPU???)

So your GPU has a heat spreader on it? Or are you talking about the HS on the gpu?

Or did you take a layer of silicon off the gpu?

Why am I asking these questions.... :sleep: 
April 13, 2008 2:47:15 PM

Well I lapped both my HSF and my CPU. I notices a temp diff. between 1-6 deggress. So i can say lapping does help.
!