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NEED HELP WITH NEW BUILD SATA HD

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  • Hard Drives
  • Storage
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April 29, 2009 5:28:37 AM

So I'm working on my first build and I'm realizing that it was possibly an expensive mistake.

I have installed all the hardware. I am trying to install Windows Vista 64 and it won't recognize the SATA HD. It asks me to load the drivers for the drive. So I went to the Gigabyte site to find the drivers and they have me download an EXE file. However, when I put the EXE file on my portable hard drive and search for it on the windows install it won't see EXE files. So how do I get the drivers onto the computer?????????

Specs: Gigabyte GA-E7AUM-DS2H , Western Digital WD6400AAKS Hard Drive , and Windows Vista 64

Somebody please help! I'm about ready to lose it.

More about : build sata

a b G Storage
April 29, 2009 6:37:22 AM

It's a self extracting file, you run it and it unpacks itself.
April 29, 2009 5:04:49 PM

MrLinux said:
It's a self extracting file, you run it and it unpacks itself.



#1 How do I run it? I don't have any operating system installed yet.

#2 I found a program that I used to extract all the files from the EXE and put those files on a portable hard drive. When I get to the step in the Vista installation that says I need the drivers I browse the folders on that drive and I can't see the files unless I click the "Hide Files that are not compatible with your system" If I leave that box checked none of the files appear on the screen as if they aren't compatible with my components. However, I got the files directly from the Gigabyte website. Does anyone have any other idea how to get the correct drivers to be read by windows.

Also the devices are listed as IDE in the BIOS, not AHCI or RAID.
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April 30, 2009 2:27:30 AM

FYI

For anyone that has a similar problem and stumbles across this thread. I was able to troubleshoot the problem with Gigabyte and this was the solution:


For some reason windows wanted the drivers installed even though the BIOS set the hard drive to IDE. When the windows install looked for the drivers it didn't find any useful ones because the controller was IDE. So instead of trying to figure this out we decided to change the controller to AHCI and when windows asked for the drivers it finally found a useful one that worked with my settings and hardware. However after this installed windows still could not see my hard drive. Luckily I had the two SATA hard drives from my previous computer and we tried connecting one of them. After the windows installer booted back up it was able to see the older SATA drive. So I was able to finally install Vista. After the OS install I connected the new hard drive and windows automatically installed the drivers for it so it could be recognized. Now I am in the process of formatting the drive. Well see if it turns out alright.

I haven't decided yet, but I may try to install vista on the newer drive after it is formatted. If that works then I will just back up my data from the previous drives and format them. My oldest hard drive is the original 200 GB drive from my old computer that is a little over 4 years old, I'm a little concerned about the age of the drive, and it failing sooner than my other drives. My second drive is a 500 GB that is about a year or so old. And now my third drive is brand new and 640 GB. I will probably like to set up a partition on that drive for the OS and backup material.
a c 363 G Storage
May 1, 2009 4:15:00 PM

It certainly is not supposed to be this much trouble. I am intrigued by your statement, "For some reason windows wanted the drivers installed even though the BIOS set the hard drive to IDE." Do you mean you had told the BIOS to boot from the IDE drive (which actually does not exist)? Or, do you mean that you told the BIOS to treat your new machine's SATA drive as a Emulated IDE drive (in Gigabyte's BIOS they call it PATA drive)? The PATA (emulated) treatment is the Gigabyte default mode of handling a SATA device and it is SUPPOSED to pretend to the rest of the world (i.e., to Windows) that this is just a plain old IDE (aka PATA) drive that Windows knows all about, no problem. If this actually is what you did and it still did not work, that is most intriguing, and a problem that gigabyte needs to fix!
May 1, 2009 10:57:01 PM

Paperdoc said:
It certainly is not supposed to be this much trouble. I am intrigued by your statement, "For some reason windows wanted the drivers installed even though the BIOS set the hard drive to IDE." Do you mean you had told the BIOS to boot from the IDE drive (which actually does not exist)? Or, do you mean that you told the BIOS to treat your new machine's SATA drive as a Emulated IDE drive (in Gigabyte's BIOS they call it PATA drive)? The PATA (emulated) treatment is the Gigabyte default mode of handling a SATA device and it is SUPPOSED to pretend to the rest of the world (i.e., to Windows) that this is just a plain old IDE (aka PATA) drive that Windows knows all about, no problem. If this actually is what you did and it still did not work, that is most intriguing, and a problem that gigabyte needs to fix!



Yes, it was a SATA drive that was being emulated as an IDE drive. Once I got into windows I had to initialize the drive and format it. Once I did that I just reinstalled Vista on the drive that I wanted to from the start. Now I just have to back up some of my old info and format the other drives.
May 2, 2009 9:32:43 AM

jerseytiger said:
Yes, it was a SATA drive that was being emulated as an IDE drive. Once I got into windows I had to initialize the drive and format it. Once I did that I just reinstalled Vista on the drive that I wanted to from the start. Now I just have to back up some of my old info and format the other drives.


Just guessing here, but it sounds to me as if you used one of the Raid ports on your MB... Those ports on most versions of RAID controller will always ask for / need a driver. I've never had a need to install a driver for any regular SATA port, as long as I set it to IDE (PATA) mode, be it on Gigabyte, DFI or ASUS. If you need to use AHCI for some reason, (hot swap comes to mind) then a driver will be required.
May 2, 2009 10:30:12 AM

croc said:
Just guessing here, but it sounds to me as if you used one of the Raid ports on your MB... Those ports on most versions of RAID controller will always ask for / need a driver. I've never had a need to install a driver for any regular SATA port, as long as I set it to IDE (PATA) mode, be it on Gigabyte, DFI or ASUS. If you need to use AHCI for some reason, (hot swap comes to mind) then a driver will be required.



Nope I definitely didn't use one of the RAID/AHCI ports. Ports 0,1, 2 are the regular SATA ports, ports 3 and 4 are the RAID/ACHI ports. They are even color coated (SATA = Yellow, RAID/ACHI only = Purple) so it's nearly impossible to mess up. I was using ports 0 and 1. The installation kept asking for the drivers for the brand new drive that I was putting in, I'm a little curious if it would have asked for the drivers for the older drives. I had already swithced to AHCI and loaded the drivers prior to plugging those in. I THINK the error was between Windows and the Hard Drive. Gigabyte did a good juob troubleshooting the problem though. However, I don't think I've even had a tech (who works in customer/technical support) tell me "I have to go" when it got to quitting time. That was a bit weird.
a c 363 G Storage
May 3, 2009 4:36:17 AM

You say, "I had already switched to AHCI and loaded the drivers prior to plugging those in." If you mean that you have set your BIOS to use the AHCI way of handling the SATA drive, that may be your problem. Earlier Windows (I'm not sure about VISTA) knew how to work with IDE drives, but had no built-in drivers for SATA or AHCI. So to allow Windows to work with such a disk as a boot device, you have to load the required drivers. If you're trying to install VISTA to a new SATA AHCI drive, early on there's a place where you have the option to load required drivers from a floppy disk. If you do that, the Install routine will load those drivers and then proceed because now it knows how to communicate with this device through the BIOS. Even if you tell the BIOS to do the PATA emulation, setting it also to go the AHCI route means the Install routines need a driver for that type of disk. I found that out when I built my machine and tried to install XP. I had set the BIOS to PATA emulation and AHCI (must be good - latest stuff with extra features!) and Windows Install could not handle the disk. Changing to no AHCI solved the problem completely.
a b G Storage
May 3, 2009 2:56:52 PM

Vista has native SATA AHCI drivers included.
All that should be needed is set the SATA controller to AHCI, put in the Vista install disk, boot to the DVD, and start the install. Same thing if you set it to IDE mode, Vista should have no problems there either.
If you are having problems getting Vista to "see" the drive, you must have something connected wrong, or the perhaps you do not have the controller enabled you have it plugged into, but the basic thing to know here is Vista does not need you to supply drivers for an SATA drive...no matter what mode you have it in.
May 3, 2009 7:24:01 PM

Nothing could have been installed wrong because the vista installation recognized the the two SATA drives, but did not recognize the new SATA drive. I wound up installing vista on the old drive and when I got into windows I was able to initialize and format the new SATA drive and without ever disconnecting it Vista was able to detect it after I had formatted it. Here is the basic procedure that I went though:


1. Had one hard drive intalled (the new SATA drive). The BIOS was set to read the device as IDE. The drive was plugged into SATA port 0, which was not on that is only for RAID or AHCI. I went to install windows. A screen came up that said I needed to load drivers for the Hard Drive. I went to the Gigabyte site and downloaded all the driver packages for the MOBO that I installed. I unzipped all the drivers and put them on a portable USB Hard Drive. I had the windows install search for the drivers, but it said that none of the drivers were compatible with my hardware or settings. Windows installer did not "see" the drive.

2. I switched the SATA to be AHCI in the BIOS. I went to install windows again. I get to the screen and it tells me ot load the drivers. Now one driver shows up that is compatible with my hardware and settings. I install that driver. Windows installer still does not see my Hard Drive.

3. I unplug the new SATA hard drive and plug in my year old SATA drive from my old computer into the same slot. Windows installer recognizes the drive.

4. I plug in an even older (4 year old) SATA hard drive that came with my old computer, along with the new drive. Windows installer sees this one as well. I Install Vista on this drive.

5. I get into windows and go to the Disk Manager. I try to format the new Hard Drive. It says that it must first be initialized. I initialize it. I am then able to format it. Windows now regognizes the disk.

6. I go to reinstall windows and then it finally sees the new drive. I install windows to it. Everything is working properly.

!