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Support hard disk size

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Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
a b G Storage
May 12, 2009 9:00:50 AM

maximum,supported hard disk size which i can use with my intel 865gbf motherboard?processor speed is 2.4

More about : support hard disk size

a b å Intel
a c 156 V Motherboard
a b G Storage
May 12, 2009 2:37:13 PM

Google is your friend. Or go to the Intel site and search for "865 chipset". The answer is either 137 GB or unlimited.
a b V Motherboard
a c 357 G Storage
May 14, 2009 6:53:05 PM

I could not find in your board's manual a direct answer to your question. However, I understand that ALL SATA devices support "48-bit LBA", which beats the 137 GB barrier and the next barrier is up in the petabyte region. The manual does not directly answer whether your board also supports 48-bit LBA for the hard drives attached to the IDE (or ATA or PATA) connectors, but probably yes.

48-bit LBA support must be available in all three of: the hard drive, its controller, and the OS installed on your machine. You certainly will have those in the mobo's SATA controller and any SATA drive you buy. As I said, not sure but likely in your board's IDE controller. If you buy ANY drive over 137 GB, it will have to include this support in order to work at all.

So, the remaining question is the Operating System. If it is VISTA, you have no worries. If it is the original version of XP, you do NOT have 48-bit LBA support. That was added with Service Pack 1 and continued in SP2 and SP3. If you have only XP with NO service Pack update, download the SP3 update and install before going further. If your OS is Win 2000, check the detail. I believe that one had 48-bit LBA support added with SP4, but check to be sure.

Once you have 48-bit LBA support in all three elements, you will find the actual current limit on the largest hard drive you can handle is: they don't make them that big! With the ability to address 2^48 disk sectors, each containing 2^9 bytes, the theoretical limit is 2^57 bytes, or about 144 million GB. It may take significant time until those beasts are on the retail market!
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