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Anonymous
November 23, 2004 11:23:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

How do you guys play base?

You shoot a disc at someone and then five minutes later it arrives where
they were five minutes ago, presuming you have a good shot.

Any tutorials anywhere?

More about : base

Anonymous
November 23, 2004 11:23:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

"Cool Guy" <coolguy@abc.xyz> wrote in message
news:1fvity3cbo1zm$.dlg@cool.guy.abc.xyz...
> How do you guys play base?
>
> You shoot a disc at someone and then five minutes later it arrives where
> they were five minutes ago, presuming you have a good shot.
>
> Any tutorials anywhere?

Its called leading your target. Don't shoot where they are, but where they
are going to be, duh!

Quixote
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 1:15:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

Quixote <quixote@-munged-writeme.com> wrote:

> Its called leading your target.

'Leading'? Shouldn't that be 'following'?

> Don't shoot where they are, but where they
> are going to be, duh!

So - any tutorials?
Related resources
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 4:54:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

"Cool Guy" <coolguy@abc.xyz> wrote in message
news:f9s71qkoktjt.dlg@cool.guy.abc.xyz...
> Quixote <quixote@-munged-writeme.com> wrote:
>
> > Its called leading your target.
>
> 'Leading'? Shouldn't that be 'following'?
>
> > Don't shoot where they are, but where they
> > are going to be, duh!
>
> So - any tutorials?

Play long enough and by instinct you will be able to predict where a player
will be in the time it takes a disk to reach them. This is called leading
the target. If you need further explanation than this, then no further
explanation will help.

Quixote
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 5:32:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

One day, while skipping through the forest, I heard the voice of Cool Guy
<coolguy@abc.xyz> coming from a tree, and thought, "Man, this is f*ed up,"
but carried on the following conversation anyway:

> Quixote <quixote@-munged-writeme.com> wrote:
>
>> Its called leading your target.
>
> 'Leading'? Shouldn't that be 'following'?

if youre following, youre already behind.

>
>> Don't shoot where they are, but where they are going to be, duh!
>
> So - any tutorials?
>

its called common sense.



--
Adept
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 3:13:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

Quixote <quixote@-munged-writeme.com> wrote:

> Play long enough and by instinct you will be able to predict where a player
> will be in the time it takes a disk to reach them. This is called leading
> the target.

Oh. I guess it's one of those American phrases which doesn't really make
sense like, "I could care less," instead of, "I couldn't care less."

Thanks for the help.
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 12:47:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

Cool Guy <coolguy@abc.xyz> wrote in
news:1gicjn9dve7t5$.dlg@cool.guy.abc.xyz:

>> Play long enough and by instinct you will be able to predict where a
>> player will be in the time it takes a disk to reach them. This is
>> called leading the target.
>
> Oh. I guess it's one of those American phrases which doesn't really
> make sense like, "I could care less," instead of, "I couldn't care
> less."

"Leading" means to go in front of. So leading a target means to put the
crosshairs in front of where the target will be, not where it is now. It's
sort of like leading a dog with a leash.
November 24, 2004 1:57:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

Cool Guy wrote:

> Oh. I guess it's one of those American phrases which doesn't really make
> sense like, "I could care less," instead of, "I couldn't care less."

As has been explained, "leading" the target makes perfect sense. It's as
if there is a leash attached to your crosshairs, pulling the target
along, at least when done correctly.

"I could care less" is not an "American phrase." It's an "ignorant
phrase." Even in America, the correct phrase is "I couldn't care less,"
but too many people butcher it.

--
Troy
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 7:56:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

Troy <gimmespam@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Cool Guy wrote:
>
>> Oh. I guess it's one of those American phrases which doesn't really make
>> sense like, "I could care less," instead of, "I couldn't care less."
>
> As has been explained, "leading" the target makes perfect sense.

Does it? I disagree, after checking the dictionary:

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=lead

> It's as
> if there is a leash attached to your crosshairs, pulling the target
> along, at least when done correctly.

That doesn't appear to make sense here, either -- unless you're actually
influencing where the target will go, which isn't the case here, AFAICS.

> "I could care less" is not an "American phrase." It's an "ignorant
> phrase." Even in America, the correct phrase is "I couldn't care less,"
> but too many people butcher it.
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 7:56:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

Cool Guy wrote:
> Troy wrote:
>> Cool Guy wrote:

>>> Oh. I guess it's one of those American phrases which doesn't
>>> really make sense like, "I could care less," instead of, "I
>>> couldn't care less."
>>
>> As has been explained, "leading" the target makes perfect sense.
>
> Does it? I disagree, after checking the dictionary:
>
> http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=lead

Check meaning 6a in the following AmE dictionary:

From www.m-w.com:

Main Entry: 1lead
Pronunciation: 'lEd
Function: verb
Inflected Form(s): led /'led/; lead·ing
Etymology: Middle English leden, from Old English l[AE]dan; akin to Old High
German leiten to lead, Old English lIthan to go
transitive senses
1 a : to guide on a way especially by going in advance b : to direct on a
course or in a direction c : to serve as a channel for <a pipe leads water
to the house>
2 : to go through : LIVE <lead a quiet life>
3 a (1) : to direct the operations, activity, or performance of <lead an
orchestra> (2) : to have charge of <lead a campaign> (3) : to suggest to (a
witness) the answer desired by asking leading questions b (1) : to go at the
head of <lead a parade> (2) : to be first in or among <lead the league> (3)
: to have a margin over <led his opponent>
4 : to bring to some conclusion or condition <led to believe otherwise>
5 : to begin play with <lead trumps>
6 a : to aim in front of (a moving object) <lead a duck> b : to pass a ball
or puck just in front of (a moving teammate)
intransitive senses
1 a : to guide someone or something along a way b : to lie, run, or open in
a specified place or direction <path leads uphill> c : to guide a dance
partner through the steps of a dance
2 a : to be first b (1) : BEGIN, OPEN (2) : to play the first card of a
trick, round, or game
3 : to tend toward or have a result <study leading to a degree>
4 : to direct the first of a series of blows at an opponent in boxing
synonym see GUIDE
- lead one down the garden path also lead one up the garden path : HOODWINK,
DECEIVE

--
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 9:31:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

"Cool Guy" <coolguy@abc.xyz> wrote in message
news:1fvity3cbo1zm$.dlg@cool.guy.abc.xyz...
> How do you guys play base?
>
> You shoot a disc at someone and then five minutes later it arrives where
> they were five minutes ago, presuming you have a good shot.
>
> Any tutorials anywhere?

Here is your tutorial:
1. Best way to learn to shoot in tribes is to shoot again and again.
2.Go to server get your ass kicked for a week or so and after that you might
even start hitting your targets.
3.After a year or two you might do it naturally.

Let me know how did this tutorial work for you in few years.

ps. T:V is way easier than Tribes 2 so you might crack it´s secrects bit
faster.
Anonymous
November 25, 2004 3:15:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 16:56:40 +0000, Cool Guy wrote:

[Crosspost stopped - why did you start to crosspost midthread?]

> Does it? I disagree, after checking the dictionary:
>
> http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=lead

*sigh* Since when was English an easy language?

+----[ Output of dict lead ]
| From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913):
| Lead \Lead\ (l[e^]d), n. [OE. led, leed, lead, AS. le['a]d; akin
| to D. lood, MHG. l[=o]t, G. loth plummet, sounding lead,
| small weight, Sw. & Dan. lod. [root]123]
| 1. (Chem.) One of the elements, a heavy, pliable, inelastic
| metal, having a bright, bluish color, but easily
| tarnished. It is both malleable and ductile, though with
| little tenacity, and is used for tubes, sheets, bullets,
| etc. Its specific gravity is 11.37. It is easily fusible,
| forms alloys with other metals, and is an ingredient of
| solder and type metal. Atomic weight, 206.4. Symbol Pb (L.
| Plumbum). It is chiefly obtained from the mineral galena,
| lead sulphide.
| [Snip several lines of metallic-based references]
|
| From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913):
| Lead \Lead\ (l[=e]d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Led} (l[e^]d); p. pr.
| & vb. n. {Leading}.] [OE. leden, AS. l[=ae]dan (akin to OS.
| l[=e]dian, D. leiden, G. leiten, Icel. le[imac][eth]a, Sw.
| leda, Dan. lede), properly a causative fr. AS. li[eth]an to
| go; akin to OHG. l[imac]dan, Icel. l[imac][eth]a, Goth.
| lei[thorn]an (in comp.). Cf. {Lode}, {Loath}.]
| 1. To guide or conduct with the hand, or by means of some
| physical contact connection; as, a father leads a child; a
| jockey leads a horse with a halter; a dog leads a blind
| man.
|
| If a blind man lead a blind man, both fall down in
| the ditch. --Wyclif
| (Matt. xv.
| 14.)
|
| They thrust him out of the city, and led him unto
| the brow of the hill. --Luke iv. 29.
|
| In thy right hand lead with thee The mountain nymph,
| sweet Liberty. --Milton.
|
| 2. To guide or conduct in a certain course, or to a certain
| place or end, by making the way known; to show the way,
| esp. by going with or going in advance of. Hence,
| figuratively: To direct; to counsel; to instruct; as, to
| lead a traveler; to lead a pupil.
|
| The Lord went before them by day in a pillar of a
| cloud, to lead them the way. --Ex. xiii.
| 21.
|
| He leadeth me beside the still waters. --Ps. xxiii.
| 2.
|
| This thought might lead me through the world's vain
| mask. Content, though blind, had I no better guide.
| --Milton.
|
| [...]
|
| 5. To draw or direct by influence, whether good or bad; to
| prevail on; to induce; to entice; to allure; as, to lead
| one to espouse a righteous cause.
|
| He was driven by the necessities of the times, more
| than led by his own disposition, to any rigor of
| actions. --Eikon
| Basilike.
|
| Silly women, laden with sins,led away by divers
| lusts. --2 Tim. iii.
| 6 (Rev. Ver.).
+----

> That doesn't appear to make sense here, either -- unless you're actually
> influencing where the target will go, which isn't the case here, AFAICS.

Before posting any further, please ensure brain is in gear.

--
"A riot is unt ugly thing, unt it's about time we had one!"
R.L.U. #300033, running WM 0.80.1 under MDK9.1
Anonymous
November 25, 2004 3:37:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

Mr K <duffstuff@hotmail.com> wrote:

[alt.usage.english put back]

> +----[ Output of dict lead ]
>| From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913):
>| Lead \Lead\ (l[e^]d), n. [OE. led, leed, lead, AS. le['a]d; akin
>| to D. lood, MHG. l[=o]t, G. loth plummet, sounding lead,
>| small weight, Sw. & Dan. lod. [root]123]
>| 1. (Chem.) One of the elements, a heavy, pliable, inelastic
>| metal, having a bright, bluish color, but easily
>| tarnished. It is both malleable and ductile, though with
>| little tenacity, and is used for tubes, sheets, bullets,
>| etc. Its specific gravity is 11.37. It is easily fusible,
>| forms alloys with other metals, and is an ingredient of
>| solder and type metal. Atomic weight, 206.4. Symbol Pb (L.
>| Plumbum). It is chiefly obtained from the mineral galena,
>| lead sulphide.
>| [Snip several lines of metallic-based references]
>|
>| From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913):
>| Lead \Lead\ (l[=e]d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Led} (l[e^]d); p. pr.
>| & vb. n. {Leading}.] [OE. leden, AS. l[=ae]dan (akin to OS.
>| l[=e]dian, D. leiden, G. leiten, Icel. le[imac][eth]a, Sw.
>| leda, Dan. lede), properly a causative fr. AS. li[eth]an to
>| go; akin to OHG. l[imac]dan, Icel. l[imac][eth]a, Goth.
>| lei[thorn]an (in comp.). Cf. {Lode}, {Loath}.]
>| 1. To guide or conduct with the hand, or by means of some
>| physical contact connection; as, a father leads a child; a
>| jockey leads a horse with a halter; a dog leads a blind
>| man.
>|
>| If a blind man lead a blind man, both fall down in
>| the ditch. --Wyclif
>| (Matt. xv.
>| 14.)
>|
>| They thrust him out of the city, and led him unto
>| the brow of the hill. --Luke iv. 29.
>|
>| In thy right hand lead with thee The mountain nymph,
>| sweet Liberty. --Milton.
>|
>| 2. To guide or conduct in a certain course, or to a certain
>| place or end, by making the way known; to show the way,
>| esp. by going with or going in advance of. Hence,
>| figuratively: To direct; to counsel; to instruct; as, to
>| lead a traveler; to lead a pupil.
>|
>| The Lord went before them by day in a pillar of a
>| cloud, to lead them the way. --Ex. xiii.
>| 21.
>|
>| He leadeth me beside the still waters. --Ps. xxiii.
>| 2.
>|
>| This thought might lead me through the world's vain
>| mask. Content, though blind, had I no better guide.
>| --Milton.
>|
>| [...]
>|
>| 5. To draw or direct by influence, whether good or bad; to
>| prevail on; to induce; to entice; to allure; as, to lead
>| one to espouse a righteous cause.
>|
>| He was driven by the necessities of the times, more
>| than led by his own disposition, to any rigor of
>| actions. --Eikon
>| Basilike.
>|
>| Silly women, laden with sins,led away by divers
>| lusts. --2 Tim. iii.
>| 6 (Rev. Ver.).
> +----

Which one are you proposing makes sense here?

Note to alt.usage.english subscribers: somebody said that predicting where
your target (in a shooting game) is going and shooting at that place is
referred to as "leading the target". I pointed out that I felt that this
is a bad analogy, since no actual *leading* is going on here.
Anonymous
November 25, 2004 3:37:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

"Cool Guy" <coolguy@abc.xyz> wrote in message
news:yftuzg38spxz$.dlg@cool.guy.abc.xyz...
> Mr K <duffstuff@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> [alt.usage.english put back]
>
> > +----[ Output of dict lead ]
> >| From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913):
> >| Lead \Lead\ (l[e^]d), n. [OE. led, leed, lead, AS. le['a]d; akin
> >| to D. lood, MHG. l[=o]t, G. loth plummet, sounding lead,
> >| small weight, Sw. & Dan. lod. [root]123]
> >| 1. (Chem.) One of the elements, a heavy, pliable, inelastic
> >| metal, having a bright, bluish color, but easily
> >| tarnished. It is both malleable and ductile, though with
> >| little tenacity, and is used for tubes, sheets, bullets,
> >| etc. Its specific gravity is 11.37. It is easily fusible,
> >| forms alloys with other metals, and is an ingredient of
> >| solder and type metal. Atomic weight, 206.4. Symbol Pb (L.
> >| Plumbum). It is chiefly obtained from the mineral galena,
> >| lead sulphide.
> >| [Snip several lines of metallic-based references]
> >|
> >| From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913):
> >| Lead \Lead\ (l[=e]d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Led} (l[e^]d); p. pr.
> >| & vb. n. {Leading}.] [OE. leden, AS. l[=ae]dan (akin to OS.
> >| l[=e]dian, D. leiden, G. leiten, Icel. le[imac][eth]a, Sw.
> >| leda, Dan. lede), properly a causative fr. AS. li[eth]an to
> >| go; akin to OHG. l[imac]dan, Icel. l[imac][eth]a, Goth.
> >| lei[thorn]an (in comp.). Cf. {Lode}, {Loath}.]
> >| 1. To guide or conduct with the hand, or by means of some
> >| physical contact connection; as, a father leads a child; a
> >| jockey leads a horse with a halter; a dog leads a blind
> >| man.
> >|
> >| If a blind man lead a blind man, both fall down in
> >| the ditch. --Wyclif
> >| (Matt. xv.
> >| 14.)
> >|
> >| They thrust him out of the city, and led him unto
> >| the brow of the hill. --Luke iv. 29.
> >|
> >| In thy right hand lead with thee The mountain nymph,
> >| sweet Liberty. --Milton.
> >|
> >| 2. To guide or conduct in a certain course, or to a certain
> >| place or end, by making the way known; to show the way,
> >| esp. by going with or going in advance of. Hence,
> >| figuratively: To direct; to counsel; to instruct; as, to
> >| lead a traveler; to lead a pupil.
> >|
> >| The Lord went before them by day in a pillar of a
> >| cloud, to lead them the way. --Ex. xiii.
> >| 21.
> >|
> >| He leadeth me beside the still waters. --Ps. xxiii.
> >| 2.
> >|
> >| This thought might lead me through the world's vain
> >| mask. Content, though blind, had I no better guide.
> >| --Milton.
> >|
> >| [...]
> >|
> >| 5. To draw or direct by influence, whether good or bad; to
> >| prevail on; to induce; to entice; to allure; as, to lead
> >| one to espouse a righteous cause.
> >|
> >| He was driven by the necessities of the times, more
> >| than led by his own disposition, to any rigor of
> >| actions. --Eikon
> >| Basilike.
> >|
> >| Silly women, laden with sins,led away by divers
> >| lusts. --2 Tim. iii.
> >| 6 (Rev. Ver.).
> > +----
>
> Which one are you proposing makes sense here?
>
> Note to alt.usage.english subscribers: somebody said that predicting where
> your target (in a shooting game) is going and shooting at that place is
> referred to as "leading the target". I pointed out that I felt that this
> is a bad analogy, since no actual *leading* is going on here.

[Senseless cross posting removed]

My, you are thick aren't you...

Quixote
Anonymous
November 25, 2004 4:07:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

In message <yftuzg38spxz$.dlg@cool.guy.abc.xyz>, Cool Guy
<coolguy@abc.xyz> writes
>Note to alt.usage.english subscribers: somebody said that predicting
>where your target (in a shooting game) is going and shooting at that
>place is referred to as "leading the target". I pointed out that I
>felt that this is a bad analogy, since no actual *leading* is going on
>here.


Leading the target is aiming a steady distance ahead of a moving target,
moving the [projectile shooting device - not required for a ray-gun] at
the same speed as the target. It's easier than aiming statically ahead
and waiting and hoping to release the shot when the distance has closed
to just the right gap to allow for the transit time of the projectile.
The sideways movement of the weapon when firing hardly makes a
significant impact (ha!) on the sideways displacement of the shot strike
at longer ranges. Of course you could also claim to lead the target
when you hit it with a lead bullet.
--
Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
Anonymous
November 25, 2004 2:31:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

Paul Wolff wrote:
> In message <yftuzg38spxz$.dlg@cool.guy.abc.xyz>, Cool Guy
> <coolguy@abc.xyz> writes
>> Note to alt.usage.english subscribers: somebody said that
predicting
>> where your target (in a shooting game) is going and shooting at
that
>> place is referred to as "leading the target". I pointed out that
I
>> felt that this is a bad analogy, since no actual *leading* is
going
>> on here.
>
>
> Leading the target is aiming a steady distance ahead of a moving
> target, moving the [projectile shooting device - not required for a
> ray-gun] at the same speed as the target. [..]

It's a perfectly ordinary usage, as Paul says; and extends beyond
shooting contexts. (Not to be confounded with "leading the barrel".)
I don't quite know what the OP is worried about.

Some Victorians used to call it "giving the bird law".

Mike.
Anonymous
November 25, 2004 9:19:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

One day, while skipping through the forest, I heard the voice of Cool Guy
<coolguy@abc.xyz> coming from a tree, and thought, "Man, this is f*ed
up," but carried on the following conversation anyway:

> Mr K <duffstuff@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> [alt.usage.english put back]
>
>> +----[ Output of dict lead ]
>>| From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913):
>>| Lead \Lead\ (l[e^]d), n. [OE. led, leed, lead, AS. le['a]d; akin
>>| to D. lood, MHG. l[=o]t, G. loth plummet, sounding lead, small
>>| weight, Sw. & Dan. lod. [root]123] 1. (Chem.) One of the elements,
>>| a heavy, pliable, inelastic
>>| metal, having a bright, bluish color, but easily
>>| tarnished. It is both malleable and ductile, though with
>>| little tenacity, and is used for tubes, sheets, bullets, etc.
>>| Its specific gravity is 11.37. It is easily fusible, forms
>>| alloys with other metals, and is an ingredient of solder and
>>| type metal. Atomic weight, 206.4. Symbol Pb (L. Plumbum). It is
>>| chiefly obtained from the mineral galena, lead sulphide.
>>| [Snip several lines of metallic-based references]
>>|
>>| From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913):
>>| Lead \Lead\ (l[=e]d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Led} (l[e^]d); p. pr.
>>| & vb. n. {Leading}.] [OE. leden, AS. l[=ae]dan (akin to OS.
>>| l[=e]dian, D. leiden, G. leiten, Icel. le[imac][eth]a, Sw.
>>| leda, Dan. lede), properly a causative fr. AS. li[eth]an to
>>| go; akin to OHG. l[imac]dan, Icel. l[imac][eth]a, Goth.
>>| lei[thorn]an (in comp.). Cf. {Lode}, {Loath}.]
>>| 1. To guide or conduct with the hand, or by means of some
>>| physical contact connection; as, a father leads a child; a
>>| jockey leads a horse with a halter; a dog leads a blind man.
>>|
>>| If a blind man lead a blind man, both fall down in
>>| the ditch. --Wyclif
>>| (Matt. xv.
>>| 14.)
>>|
>>| They thrust him out of the city, and led him unto
>>| the brow of the hill. --Luke iv. 29.
>>|
>>| In thy right hand lead with thee The mountain nymph,
>>| sweet Liberty. --Milton.
>>|
>>| 2. To guide or conduct in a certain course, or to a certain
>>| place or end, by making the way known; to show the way, esp. by
>>| going with or going in advance of. Hence, figuratively: To
>>| direct; to counsel; to instruct; as, to lead a traveler; to
>>| lead a pupil.
>>|
>>| The Lord went before them by day in a pillar of a
>>| cloud, to lead them the way. --Ex. xiii.
>>| 21.
>>|
>>| He leadeth me beside the still waters. --Ps. xxiii.
>>| 2.
>>|
>>| This thought might lead me through the world's vain
>>| mask. Content, though blind, had I no better guide.
>>| --Milton.
>>|
>>| [...]
>>|
>>| 5. To draw or direct by influence, whether good or bad; to
>>| prevail on; to induce; to entice; to allure; as, to lead
>>| one to espouse a righteous cause.
>>|
>>| He was driven by the necessities of the times, more
>>| than led by his own disposition, to any rigor of
>>| actions. --Eikon
>>| Basilike.
>>|
>>| Silly women, laden with sins,led away by divers
>>| lusts. --2 Tim. iii. 6
>>| (Rev. Ver.).
>> +----
>
> Which one are you proposing makes sense here?
>
> Note to alt.usage.english subscribers: somebody said that predicting
> where your target (in a shooting game) is going and shooting at that
> place is referred to as "leading the target". I pointed out that I
> felt that this is a bad analogy, since no actual *leading* is going on
> here.
>

let me spell this out for you..
y o u a r e a f u c k i n g m o r o n

--
Adept
Anonymous
November 25, 2004 9:19:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

DEbig3 <debig3@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:<Xns95AC7D7113A9Bomgwtf@130.133.1.4>...
> One day, while skipping through the forest, I heard the voice of Cool Guy
> <coolguy@abc.xyz> coming from a tree, and thought, "Man, this is f*ed
> up," but carried on the following conversation anyway:
>
> > Mr K <duffstuff@hotmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > [alt.usage.english put back]
> >
[a frankly baffling exchange snipped]

I'm just so made up to find that there's a usenet group for
starsiege.tribes. Where can I go to find more about this cultural
phenomenon?

Will.
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 1:49:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

On 25 Nov 2004 14:43:22 -0800, Will wrote:

> [a frankly baffling exchange snipped]

[An uninteresting newsgroup snipped - Sorry, I don't do crossposts]

> I'm just so made up to find that there's a usenet group for
> starsiege.tribes.

Yeah, ditto on the usage of the English language.

> Where can I go to find more about this cultural phenomenon?

Dunno. Ask your ISP.

--
"A riot is unt ugly thing, unt it's about time we had one!"
R.L.U. #300033, running WM 0.80.1 under MDK9.1
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 12:48:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

"Will" <billrigby@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:D 36f7597.0411251443.1a951f9a@posting.google.com...
>
> I'm just so made up to find that there's a usenet group for
> starsiege.tribes.

"Just so made up"? Can't say I've ever heard that one before...a
regionalism? What exactly does it mean - intrigued? ecstatic?
surprised? Too many question marks?
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 12:48:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

Dylan Nicholson typed thus:

> "Will" <billrigby@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:D 36f7597.0411251443.1a951f9a@posting.google.com...
> >
> > I'm just so made up to find that there's a usenet group for
> > starsiege.tribes.
>
> "Just so made up"? Can't say I've ever heard that one before...a
> regionalism? What exactly does it mean - intrigued? ecstatic?
> surprised? Too many question marks?

"to be made up" is not uncommon in the UK - it means "delighted".
"just so" is not required - that has intensified it.

My daughter got all A-grades - I'm made up.

--
David
=====
replace the first component of address
with the definite article.
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 12:48:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

"Dylan Nicholson" <wizofaus@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<30n5p1F30ga7eU1@uni-berlin.de>...
> "Will" <billrigby@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:D 36f7597.0411251443.1a951f9a@posting.google.com...
> >
> > I'm just so made up to find that there's a usenet group for
> > starsiege.tribes.
>
> "Just so made up"? Can't say I've ever heard that one before...a
> regionalism? What exactly does it mean - intrigued? ecstatic?
> surprised? Too many question marks?

It is a regionalism, or it was originally, I think. It's hit the
mainstream via its adoption by the estuarine-speakers. I used it
"ironically"; I think it a truly ugly and stupid expression. So why
the hell am I propagating it on Usenet, you may ask?

Will.
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 12:48:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

"the Omrud" <usenet.omrud@gmail.com> wrote...
> Dylan Nicholson typed thus:
> > "Will" <billrigby@hotmail.com> wrote...
> > >
> > > I'm just so made up to find that there's a usenet group for
> > > starsiege.tribes.
> >
> > "Just so made up"? Can't say I've ever heard that one before...a
> > regionalism? What exactly does it mean - intrigued? ecstatic?
> > surprised? Too many question marks?
>
> "to be made up" is not uncommon in the UK - it means "delighted".
> "just so" is not required - that has intensified it.
>
> My daughter got all A-grades - I'm made up.

I'd say that it's a regionalism, though -- Scouse, to be precise.

Matti
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 2:39:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

billrigby@hotmail.com (Will) wrote in
news:D 36f7597.0411251443.1a951f9a@posting.google.com:

> I'm just so made up to find that there's a usenet group for
> starsiege.tribes. Where can I go to find more about this cultural
> phenomenon?

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/alt.games.starsiege...
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 5:11:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

In article <MPG.1c10f9494784f2b098aa7f@news.individual.net>, the
Omrud at usenet.omrud@gmail.com exposited:
> Dylan Nicholson typed thus:
>
> > "Will" <billrigby@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:D 36f7597.0411251443.1a951f9a@posting.google.com...
> > >
> > > I'm just so made up to find that there's a usenet group for
> > > starsiege.tribes.
> >
> > "Just so made up"? Can't say I've ever heard that one before...a
> > regionalism? What exactly does it mean - intrigued? ecstatic?
> > surprised? Too many question marks?
>
> "to be made up" is not uncommon in the UK - it means "delighted".
> "just so" is not required - that has intensified it.
>
> My daughter got all A-grades - I'm made up.

The neighbors dropped over yesterday, does that mean we're
knocked up?
--
dg (domain=ccwebster)
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 8:09:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 09:44:42 -0000, "Matti Lamprhey"
<matti@official-totally-reversed.com> wrote:

>"the Omrud" <usenet.omrud@gmail.com> wrote...
>> Dylan Nicholson typed thus:
>> > "Will" <billrigby@hotmail.com> wrote...
>> > >
>> > > I'm just so made up to find that there's a usenet group for
>> > > starsiege.tribes.
>> >
>> > "Just so made up"? Can't say I've ever heard that one before...a
>> > regionalism? What exactly does it mean - intrigued? ecstatic?
>> > surprised? Too many question marks?
>>
>> "to be made up" is not uncommon in the UK - it means "delighted".
>> "just so" is not required - that has intensified it.
>>
>> My daughter got all A-grades - I'm made up.
>
>I'd say that it's a regionalism, though -- Scouse, to be precise.
>
And the rest of Lancashire, I think.

--
Don Aitken

Mail to the addresses given in the headers is no longer being
read. To mail me, substitute "clara.co.uk" for "freeuk.com".
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 10:42:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

"Don Aitken" <don-aitken@freeuk.com> wrote...
> "Matti Lamprhey" <matti@official-totally-reversed.com> wrote:
> >"the Omrud" <usenet.omrud@gmail.com> wrote...
> >> Dylan Nicholson typed thus:
> >> > "Will" <billrigby@hotmail.com> wrote...
> >> > >
> >> > > I'm just so made up to find that there's a usenet group for
> >> > > starsiege.tribes.
> >> >
> >> > "Just so made up"? Can't say I've ever heard that one before...a
> >> > regionalism? What exactly does it mean - intrigued? ecstatic?
> >> > surprised? Too many question marks?
> >>
> >> "to be made up" is not uncommon in the UK - it means "delighted".
> >> "just so" is not required - that has intensified it.
> >>
> >> My daughter got all A-grades - I'm made up.
> >
> >I'd say that it's a regionalism, though -- Scouse, to be precise.
> >
> And the rest of Lancashire, I think.

Well perhaps it is NOW, but when I heard first heard it in the 1970s it
was a Scouse thing.

Matti
Anonymous
November 27, 2004 1:58:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

don groves wrote:
> In article <MPG.1c10f9494784f2b098aa7f@news.individual.net>, the
> Omrud at usenet.omrud@gmail.com exposited:
>> Dylan Nicholson typed thus:
>>
>>> "Will" <billrigby@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>>> news:D 36f7597.0411251443.1a951f9a@posting.google.com...
>>>>
>>>> I'm just so made up to find that there's a usenet group for
>>>> starsiege.tribes.
>>>
>>> "Just so made up"? Can't say I've ever heard that one before...a
>>> regionalism? What exactly does it mean - intrigued? ecstatic?
>>> surprised? Too many question marks?
>>
>> "to be made up" is not uncommon in the UK - it means "delighted".
>> "just so" is not required - that has intensified it.
>>
>> My daughter got all A-grades - I'm made up.
>
> The neighbors dropped over yesterday, does that mean we're
> knocked up?

Only if you were still in bed at the time. (This august convocation
has discussed the Great Western Railway's Swindon knocker-up before,
I think.)

(I'd never heard this use of "made up" before this thread. I wonder
if it's related to the Shakespearean usage, in which it means
something like "well set up": e.g. one of the mechanicals in MND
speaks of being "made men" if their play's a hit with the quality.)

Mike.
Anonymous
November 27, 2004 2:18:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 22:58:56 -0000, Mike Lyle wrote:

[Crosspost stopped - The buggers are breeding :(  ]

> Only if you were still in bed at the time. (This august convocation
> has discussed the Great Western Railway's Swindon knocker-up before,
> I think.)

http://tinyurl.com/6b8xt
http://tinyurl.com/5mbsk
http://tinyurl.com/57pe3
.... etc.
*sigh*

> (I'd never heard this use of "made up" before this thread. I wonder
> if it's related to the Shakespearean usage, in which it means
> something like "well set up": e.g. one of the mechanicals in MND
> speaks of being "made men" if their play's a hit with the quality.)
>
> Mike.

http://tinyurl.com/6n36g
Jeez, some people really are ignoramuses.

--
"A riot is unt ugly thing, unt it's about time we had one!"
R.L.U. #300033, running WM 0.80.1 under MDK9.1
Anonymous
November 27, 2004 3:11:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes,alt.usage.english (More info?)

Matti Lamprhey typed thus:

> "Don Aitken" <don-aitken@freeuk.com> wrote...
> > "Matti Lamprhey" <matti@official-totally-reversed.com> wrote:
> > >"the Omrud" <usenet.omrud@gmail.com> wrote...
> > >> Dylan Nicholson typed thus:
> > >> > "Will" <billrigby@hotmail.com> wrote...
> > >> > >
> > >> > > I'm just so made up to find that there's a usenet group for
> > >> > > starsiege.tribes.
> > >> >
> > >> > "Just so made up"? Can't say I've ever heard that one before...a
> > >> > regionalism? What exactly does it mean - intrigued? ecstatic?
> > >> > surprised? Too many question marks?
> > >>
> > >> "to be made up" is not uncommon in the UK - it means "delighted".
> > >> "just so" is not required - that has intensified it.
> > >>
> > >> My daughter got all A-grades - I'm made up.
> > >
> > >I'd say that it's a regionalism, though -- Scouse, to be precise.
> > >
> > And the rest of Lancashire, I think.
>
> Well perhaps it is NOW, but when I heard first heard it in the 1970s it
> was a Scouse thing.

It's certainly Mancunian now. I can't remember when I first heard it
though.

--
David
=====
replace the first component of address
with the definite article.
November 30, 2004 1:04:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

Mr K wrote:

> [An uninteresting newsgroup snipped - Sorry, I don't do crossposts]

I majored in English. I love English. I am, for some bizarre reason,
fascinated with etymology. Still, even I know to avoid alt.usage.english.

--
Troy
November 30, 2004 1:04:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

Cool Guy wrote:
> Does it? I disagree, after checking the dictionary:

My, you certainly are brazen, arguing English usage with an English
major and a writer.

> http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=lead

From that exact link comes the first definition of "lead" as an
intransitive verb.

"To be first; be ahead"

This explains where "leading" a target comes from. When you lead a
target, your sights are ahead of your target, in anticipation of where
the target will be.

>>It's as
>>if there is a leash attached to your crosshairs, pulling the target
>>along, at least when done correctly.
>
> That doesn't appear to make sense here, either -- unless you're actually
> influencing where the target will go, which isn't the case here, AFAICS.

The key words in the sentence were "as if." If you've ever seen somebody
who was good at leading, it really does appear as if the crosshairs are
controlling the target.

Of course, judging by the responses from alt.usage.english, we're not
the only people who think the phrase makes sense.

--
Troy
!