TOT: Linux

Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

I know there are Linux enthusiasts on this group, Scratch and Mr. K
spring immediately to mind.

I have a question about Linux. I have the ISO's for all 3 of Redhat
9's installation. And I know that Redhat has dropped support for all
but the enterprise Redhat at a premium.

Should I forget about using the unsupported Redhat casually and go
with the Fedora project for the sake of updates and whatnot, or go
with another distro entirely?

And if so:

A. What distribution would you recommend?
B. What do you use, and...
C. What prompted you to use it?

Also, if I were to wrap my head around some of the more esoteric and
less "user friendly" aspects of the OS, do you feel it would be
worthwhile from a professional standpoint? In other words, how much
does it help on a resumé/CV?

Currently I diddle with it because it's totally fresh and new to me
and smacks of the old days when messing with computers was more fun.

--
--==< S m e g h e a d >==--
22 answers Last reply
More about linux
  1. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2005 17:26:40 -0600, Smeghead wrote:

    > I know there are Linux enthusiasts on this group, Scratch and Mr. K
    > spring immediately to mind.
    >
    > I have a question about Linux. I have the ISO's for all 3 of Redhat
    > 9's installation. And I know that Redhat has dropped support for all
    > but the enterprise Redhat at a premium.
    >
    > Should I forget about using the unsupported Redhat casually and go
    > with the Fedora project for the sake of updates and whatnot, or go
    > with another distro entirely?
    >
    > And if so:
    >
    > A. What distribution would you recommend?

    The best one would be the one you enjoy using. Not much of a reply, I
    know, but it's the best one. With (certain) Linux distros being free,
    it'll only cost you 3-6 CD (CD-RW's for a start imho).

    > B. What do you use

    Mandrake 9.1 (9.1½ to be exact, given the amount of 9.2 software I've
    installed), and I'm a few hours away from having the DVD ISO of MDK10.1.

    > , and...
    > C. What prompted you to use it?

    1. I'd tried RedHat 6.1 and hated it. I'd seen Suse being used and didn't
    like the look of it.
    2. It was free on a cover DVD.
    3. I was sick to death of Windows just not working as how I wanted. I had
    to do what it wanted. Plus the feel of Windows was too flaky for my
    tastes.

    > Also, if I were to wrap my head around some of the more esoteric and
    > less "user friendly" aspects of the OS, do you feel it would be
    > worthwhile from a professional standpoint? In other words, how much
    > does it help on a resumé/CV?

    There's professional Linux courses available (at cost), so the demand is
    on the rise:
    http://www.redhat.com/training/

    > Currently I diddle with it because it's totally fresh and new to me
    > and smacks of the old days when messing with computers was more fun.

    Given that as your outlook on the OS, and that you already have the RH
    isos, burn those onto CD-RW's and go for the dualboot option. If you don't
    like RH, download FC, dump onto CD-RW's, etc.

    --
    "A riot is unt ugly thing, unt it's about time we had one!"
    R.L.U. #300033, running WM 0.80.1 under MDK9.1½
  2. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    On Mon, 3 Jan 2005 23:56:40 +0000, Mr K <duffstuff@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >On Mon, 03 Jan 2005 17:26:40 -0600, Smeghead wrote:
    >
    >> I know there are Linux enthusiasts on this group, Scratch and Mr. K
    >> spring immediately to mind.
    >>
    >> I have a question about Linux. I have the ISO's for all 3 of Redhat
    >> 9's installation. And I know that Redhat has dropped support for all
    >> but the enterprise Redhat at a premium.
    >>
    >> Should I forget about using the unsupported Redhat casually and go
    >> with the Fedora project for the sake of updates and whatnot, or go
    >> with another distro entirely?
    >>
    >> And if so:
    >>
    >> A. What distribution would you recommend?
    >
    >The best one would be the one you enjoy using. Not much of a reply, I
    >know, but it's the best one. With (certain) Linux distros being free,
    >it'll only cost you 3-6 CD (CD-RW's for a start imho).

    I used Redhat superficially at work, which is why I downloaded it. And
    all I had to do there was open a shell every hour and run some scripts
    to check to see if the supercomputers were behaving and all the
    datawarehouses were serving up tapes properly.

    But other than that, I didn't get much into the workings of the OS. I
    had RH on my PC for about 2 months, and enjoyed tooling with it.

    >> B. What do you use
    >
    >Mandrake 9.1 (9.1œ to be exact, given the amount of 9.2 software I've
    >installed), and I'm a few hours away from having the DVD ISO of MDK10.1.

    I've heard a lot of good about Mandrake. It was one of the distros I
    was going to download. I burned an ISO of Knoppix and have been
    playing with that. Really cool all the junk they have packed onto one
    bootable CD. But running an OS from CD is really slow.

    >> , and...
    >> C. What prompted you to use it?
    >
    >1. I'd tried RedHat 6.1 and hated it. I'd seen Suse being used and didn't
    >like the look of it.
    >2. It was free on a cover DVD.
    >3. I was sick to death of Windows just not working as how I wanted. I had
    >to do what it wanted. Plus the feel of Windows was too flaky for my
    >tastes.

    How long have you been using Linux? Are you dual booted or using it
    exclusively? And how long did it take for you to feel comfortable with
    it?

    >> Also, if I were to wrap my head around some of the more esoteric and
    >> less "user friendly" aspects of the OS, do you feel it would be
    >> worthwhile from a professional standpoint? In other words, how much
    >> does it help on a resumé/CV?
    >
    >There's professional Linux courses available (at cost), so the demand is
    >on the rise:
    >http://www.redhat.com/training/

    Cool! I know the Unix/Linux guys at work all walk around with smug
    disdain for anything MS related. So I figured they had to be getting
    more money than me. Heheh

    >> Currently I diddle with it because it's totally fresh and new to me
    >> and smacks of the old days when messing with computers was more fun.
    >
    >Given that as your outlook on the OS, and that you already have the RH
    >isos, burn those onto CD-RW's and go for the dualboot option. If you don't
    >like RH, download FC, dump onto CD-RW's, etc.

    Yeah, you're right. The free distros only cost the time and CD to burn
    the ISO...

    --
    --==< S m e g h e a d >==--
  3. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2005 18:42:53 -0600, Smeghead wrote:

    > I've heard a lot of good about Mandrake. It was one of the distros I
    > was going to download. I burned an ISO of Knoppix and have been
    > playing with that. Really cool all the junk they have packed onto one
    > bootable CD. But running an OS from CD is really slow.

    Knoppix is impressive, but remember that that's based on Debian.

    > How long have you been using Linux? Are you dual booted or using it
    > exclusively? And how long did it take for you to feel comfortable with
    > it?

    I've been in Linux now for 2 years. I started off with a dualboot, found a
    GUI I'm comfortable with (WindowMaker), and slowly began to move my
    existing data off the Windows partitions over to the Linux partitions.
    Iirc, it was about 6 months before I'd taken the plunge to go 100% Linux.

    I still do use Windows apps (Forté Agent for instance, in Winex), mainly
    due to the fact that I haven't yet found a Linux-based app of a similar
    quality.

    > Cool! I know the Unix/Linux guys at work all walk around with smug
    > disdain for anything MS related.

    Yeah, there's a couple where I'm at at the moment. Given that I'm at a
    place that trains total beginners on a PC, I find their attitude rather
    annoying.

    > So I figured they had to be getting more money than me. Heheh

    Don't count on it.

    > Yeah, you're right. The free distros only cost the time and CD to burn
    > the ISO...

    :)

    --
    "A riot is unt ugly thing, unt it's about time we had one!"
    R.L.U. #300033, running WM 0.80.1 under MDK9.1½
  4. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    "Smeghead" <tribesfan@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:s2pjt0d5vq13guevh7par42a6gde1737kv@4ax.com:

    > Cool! I know the Unix/Linux guys at work all walk around with smug
    > disdain for anything MS related. So I figured they had to be getting
    > more money than me. Heheh

    That just means they know about as much as a Windows admin, plus "ls".
    They're very annoying to those of us who've seen Linux' warts, as they
    clearly have no objectivity and no credibility with real Windows admins
    (the kind who actually know something about operating systems).

    I've been using Red Hat since 5.2 and am now using Fedora Core 2 on 3
    servers (including MA's server). Apart from the logo, Fedora looks just
    like earlier versions of RH. Ditch your RH9 CD's (they're obsolete) and
    grab FC3. Not that I'm saying RH is better than the others. It's just what
    I know. If you're just dabbling, try them all. Load a different distro on
    some empty disk space every week until you've tried them all. And don't
    forget to try BSD. It's got a reputation for performance and security. I
    think you can even test-drive Solaris free for personal use.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 10:01:16 -0600, ScratchMonkey
    <scratchmonkey.blacklist@sewingwitch.com> wrote:

    >"Smeghead" <tribesfan@hotmail.com> wrote in
    >news:s2pjt0d5vq13guevh7par42a6gde1737kv@4ax.com:
    >
    >> Cool! I know the Unix/Linux guys at work all walk around with smug
    >> disdain for anything MS related. So I figured they had to be getting
    >> more money than me. Heheh
    >
    >That just means they know about as much as a Windows admin, plus "ls".
    >They're very annoying to those of us who've seen Linux' warts, as they
    >clearly have no objectivity and no credibility with real Windows admins
    >(the kind who actually know something about operating systems).

    They're only slightly less annoying than a Mac zealot.

    A friend of mine who is not anti-MS, just pro-Linux, is absolutely
    livid about Mac users who say they're Unix users because OSX is based
    on a modified kernel.

    To get him riled up, all you had to ask is "How're your Mac brethren?"
    They're not MY brothers!

    A woman in the public affairs office who uses a an OSX loaded G5 was
    showing him how she can pull up a Linux-like CLI and pull off a few
    Unix commands.

    He was ranting about that all day. "It's still not Linux. Stupid Mac
    users think they know something..."

    He's a very particular fellow. He does all kinds of review searches
    and comparison shopping before buying something as mundane as ethernet
    plugs to crimp onto cat5.

    --
    --==< S m e g h e a d >==--
  6. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    Frank van Schie <frankNOSPAM@email.it> wrote in
    news:xJednRsNbKpBZUfcRVnysQ@casema.nl:

    > 1- The package management. Picked up by more distro's now, though.
    > Basically, if I had a clean Linux install and I want Apache, I type
    > "apt-get install apache", and it'll sod off to duh intarweb, download
    > Apache, any libraries I might need and don't have, and it'll install it
    > for me with a simple configuration file. Same goes for any package whose
    > name you know and which has existed for a while.

    apt is available for Red Hat systems, but I'm using yum, which does
    something similar. They work with RPM, the way apt works with deb. (RPM and
    deb are packaging formats, like msi for Win32. They specify the
    dependencies needed. apt and yum use a database of available packages to
    resolve the dependencies, if possible. yum can draw packages from multiple
    "repositories". It's typically configured to draw packages from the
    distro's release repository plus its update repository, and you can add
    additional 3rd party repositories, including the bleeding edge distro
    development repository (called "Rawhide" on Red Hat).
  7. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    "Frank van Schie" <frankNOSPAM@email.it> wrote in message
    news:xJednRsNbKpBZUfcRVnysQ@casema.nl...

    > If you want to see what linux CAN do, if properly configured, check out
    > Knoppix. Burn it to a CD and pray to it twice daily. It's got a slick
    > KDE window manager, lots of applications, all on one bootable CD, no
    > installation required. :-)


    Wow. I burned Knoppix last night and booted up. There have obviously been
    some great advances in Linux (at least gui-wise) since I last had an
    install. I looked at it several years back and it never really clicked for
    me. I am not in condemnation of Windows and I very much require it for my
    livelihood, but coming from a Commodore 64 and Amiga background I thought I
    might appreciate the command line power. Anyway did not have the time for
    the steep re-learning curve at the time and just dropped it. This Knoppix,
    however, is a slick looking deal. I may have to throw up one of my spare
    boxes to fiddle with this Linux again.

    Quixote
  8. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    Smeghead <tribesfan@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > I know there are Linux enthusiasts on this group, Scratch and Mr. K
    > spring immediately to mind.

    ....and vast number of lurkers like me for example :-)

    [...]
    > And if so:
    > A. What distribution would you recommend?

    mandrake, suse, fedora and debian for example. you can download
    all of them and try for at least a month each of them. then
    you'll decide which is the best one for you

    > B. What do you use, and...

    debian

    > C. What prompted you to use it?

    I tried redhat (5.x and 6.x) and didn't like it. then I've installed
    debian and it became my favourite distribution

    > Also, if I were to wrap my head around some of the more esoteric and
    > less "user friendly" aspects of the OS, do you feel it would be
    > worthwhile from a professional standpoint? In other words, how much
    > does it help on a resumé/CV?

    it depends what you are doing. it can be good idea for a programmer
    who codes on other unices at work

    > Currently I diddle with it because it's totally fresh and new to me
    > and smacks of the old days when messing with computers was more fun.

    my gf's father is fooling around with knoppix at the moment and
    he is a guy who enjoyed 8-bit computers 'few' years ago

    --
    Conan's father: "No one in this world can you trust. Not men, not women,
    not beasts. [Points to sword.] But this... this you can trust."
    - "Conan the Barbarian"
  9. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    On Wed, 5 Jan 2005 16:23:48 -0600, "Quixote"
    <quixote@-munged-writeme.com> wrote:

    >
    >"Frank van Schie" <frankNOSPAM@email.it> wrote in message
    >news:xJednRsNbKpBZUfcRVnysQ@casema.nl...
    >
    >> If you want to see what linux CAN do, if properly configured, check out
    >> Knoppix. Burn it to a CD and pray to it twice daily. It's got a slick
    >> KDE window manager, lots of applications, all on one bootable CD, no
    >> installation required. :-)
    >
    >
    >Wow. I burned Knoppix last night and booted up. There have obviously been
    >some great advances in Linux (at least gui-wise) since I last had an
    >install. I looked at it several years back and it never really clicked for
    >me. I am not in condemnation of Windows and I very much require it for my
    >livelihood, but coming from a Commodore 64 and Amiga background I thought I
    >might appreciate the command line power. Anyway did not have the time for
    >the steep re-learning curve at the time and just dropped it. This Knoppix,
    >however, is a slick looking deal. I may have to throw up one of my spare
    >boxes to fiddle with this Linux again.

    Hey, Q! I used to have an C64, C128, Amiga 500, Amiga 1200 and an
    Amiga 4000 before going over to wintel boxes.

    Knoppix is pretty cool. It's amazing how much software they have
    crammed on that one ISO. A ton of games and the star-chart-tracking
    program thingy is pretty cool.

    Anyway, speaking of Commodore, I saw this story the other night on an
    Avantgo cached page on my PDA. Check it out!

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4145965.stm

    --
    --==< S m e g h e a d >==--
  10. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    Smeghead's last words before the Sword of Azrial plunged through his body
    were:
    > Should I forget about using the unsupported Redhat casually and go
    > with the Fedora project for the sake of updates and whatnot, or go
    > with another distro entirely?

    If you want, use it, because RH support aint that big a deal, its akin to
    M$'s I think. There are many other better sources for support

    > And if so:
    > A. What distribution would you recommend?

    I like Debian, due to the massive support of Apt servers (net installs
    for pretty much most opensource software), and lot of info on the net
    about it. For not someone that familiar with debian, I'd recommend using
    the Kanotix LiveCD to install it (not Knoppix, Kanotix is meant for HD
    installs, whree Knoppix can be but isnt meant to be), because Debian's
    installer is atrocious to those not familiar or brave. I'd also recommend
    getting a Apt-get GUI for those who are that great with a command line
    (although, "apt-get install <packagenamehere>" is a pretty simple command
    to download, and install software).

    > B. What do you use, and...

    Debian Sid

    > C. What prompted you to use it?

    alot more of the things are tweakable (some distros try to GUI-fy alot),
    apt-get, and the deb packages (alot better to deal with than rpm's, since
    they contain the dependency info, so most installers (apt-get, aptitude,
    kpackage, etc) are able to grab dependencies that you dont have)


    > Also, if I were to wrap my head around some of the more esoteric and
    > less "user friendly" aspects of the OS, do you feel it would be
    > worthwhile from a professional standpoint? In other words, how much does
    > it help on a resumé/CV?

    Eh, thats iffy. Experience doesnt seem to mean much if you dont have
    certificates anymore, but it still is nice to have.

    > Currently I diddle with it because it's totally fresh and new to me and
    > smacks of the old days when messing with computers was more fun.

    Thats good to hear, because there is alot of messing you can do with linux
  11. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    Frank van Schie's last words before the Sword of Azrial plunged through
    his body were:

    > You can also remedy this somewhat by using the unstable tree
    > (but keep in mind that they *mean* the 'unstable')

    I've been running Unstable for a year and a half now, with no problems as
    far as things being unstable

    > If you want to see what linux CAN do, if properly configured, check out
    > Knoppix. Burn it to a CD and pray to it twice daily. It's got a slick
    > KDE window manager, lots of applications, all on one bootable CD, no
    > installation required. :-)

    I'd recommend Kanotix over Knoppix. More people know of Knoppix because it
    was first, but Kanotix has less issues. The bugs aren't really noticable
    if you run from a CD, but if you try to install it to a hard drive, then
    you do. Knoppix uses a wierd package mix of things from stable, unstable,
    experimental, and testing, due to this the package dependencies can break
    very easily if you arent careful. Also, Kanotix has a few more
    optimizations as far as fat being cut out to make it run a bit faster.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    ScratchMonkey's last words before the Sword of Azrial plunged through his
    body were:

    > Frank van Schie <frankNOSPAM@email.it> wrote in
    > news:xJednRsNbKpBZUfcRVnysQ@casema.nl:
    >
    >> 1- The package management. Picked up by more distro's now, though.
    >> Basically, if I had a clean Linux install and I want Apache, I type
    >> "apt-get install apache", and it'll sod off to duh intarweb, download
    >> Apache, any libraries I might need and don't have, and it'll install it
    >> for me with a simple configuration file. Same goes for any package whose
    >> name you know and which has existed for a while.
    >
    > apt is available for Red Hat systems, but I'm using yum, which does
    > something similar. They work with RPM, the way apt works with deb. (RPM and
    > deb are packaging formats, like msi for Win32. They specify the
    > dependencies needed. apt and yum use a database of available packages to
    > resolve the dependencies, if possible. yum can draw packages from multiple
    > "repositories". It's typically configured to draw packages from the
    > distro's release repository plus its update repository, and you can add
    > additional 3rd party repositories, including the bleeding edge distro
    > development repository (called "Rawhide" on Red Hat).

    apt is available, but in my experience Debian has far greater support for
    Apt than any other distro.
  13. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    "Smeghead" <tribesfan@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:lrjpt0tllhh1mtnvondigplhndrf4a9bd9@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 5 Jan 2005 16:23:48 -0600, "Quixote"
    > <quixote@-munged-writeme.com> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Frank van Schie" <frankNOSPAM@email.it> wrote in message
    > >news:xJednRsNbKpBZUfcRVnysQ@casema.nl...
    > >
    > >> If you want to see what linux CAN do, if properly configured, check out
    > >> Knoppix. Burn it to a CD and pray to it twice daily. It's got a slick
    > >> KDE window manager, lots of applications, all on one bootable CD, no
    > >> installation required. :-)
    > >
    > >
    > >Wow. I burned Knoppix last night and booted up. There have obviously
    been
    > >some great advances in Linux (at least gui-wise) since I last had an
    > >install. I looked at it several years back and it never really clicked
    for
    > >me. I am not in condemnation of Windows and I very much require it for
    my
    > >livelihood, but coming from a Commodore 64 and Amiga background I thought
    I
    > >might appreciate the command line power. Anyway did not have the time
    for
    > >the steep re-learning curve at the time and just dropped it. This
    Knoppix,
    > >however, is a slick looking deal. I may have to throw up one of my spare
    > >boxes to fiddle with this Linux again.
    >
    > Hey, Q! I used to have an C64, C128, Amiga 500, Amiga 1200 and an
    > Amiga 4000 before going over to wintel boxes.
    >
    > Knoppix is pretty cool. It's amazing how much software they have
    > crammed on that one ISO. A ton of games and the star-chart-tracking
    > program thingy is pretty cool.
    >
    > Anyway, speaking of Commodore, I saw this story the other night on an
    > Avantgo cached page on my PDA. Check it out!
    >
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4145965.stm
    >

    LOL. A new Commodore... hmmmm Anyway those were the days huh? I had a
    couple of 64s. One of them I added a second sound output for true stereo
    and it played mod files written in stereo. That was a hoot back then. I
    had two Amiga 500s also. Even had them direct connected in a crude network.
    One I had souped up to a Fat Agnus chip with 2 MB of chip mem, an
    accelerator running at a whopping 14 mHz and a 40 MB Conner harddrive and
    some added ram. I still use my old 1084 monitor hooked to a VCR as an extra
    television unit.

    Quixote
  14. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    Smeghead's last words before the Sword of Azrial plunged through his body
    were:
    > Have you ever tried the PHLAK (Professional Hacker's Linux Assault
    > Kit) distro? It's a LiveCD with sniffers and scanners. But the funny
    > thing I thought was the emergency cloaking feature, which brings up an
    > innocent Windows XP looking desktop. Hehehe.

    No, I havent had the pleasure of testing that one
  15. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    On Thu, 6 Jan 2005 01:24:59 -0600, "Quixote"
    <quixote@-munged-writeme.com> wrote:

    >> Hey, Q! I used to have an C64, C128, Amiga 500, Amiga 1200 and an
    >> Amiga 4000 before going over to wintel boxes.
    >>
    >> Knoppix is pretty cool. It's amazing how much software they have
    >> crammed on that one ISO. A ton of games and the star-chart-tracking
    >> program thingy is pretty cool.
    >>
    >> Anyway, speaking of Commodore, I saw this story the other night on an
    >> Avantgo cached page on my PDA. Check it out!
    >>
    >> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4145965.stm
    >>
    >
    >LOL. A new Commodore... hmmmm Anyway those were the days huh? I had a
    >couple of 64s. One of them I added a second sound output for true stereo
    >and it played mod files written in stereo. That was a hoot back then. I
    >had two Amiga 500s also. Even had them direct connected in a crude network.
    >One I had souped up to a Fat Agnus chip with 2 MB of chip mem, an
    >accelerator running at a whopping 14 mHz and a 40 MB Conner harddrive and
    >some added ram. I still use my old 1084 monitor hooked to a VCR as an extra
    >television unit.

    Man, I haven't even thought about those speeds, model names and
    chipsets in years!

    My Amiga 1200 had 2 Megs and an '040 processor. That was the first one
    I tried messing about with rendering and animation on.

    When I got my 500, I thought I was slick because I had 2 floppies. No
    more bloody swapping disks to copy or load.

    Then I got a 70MB HDD on my Amiga 1200. It was my first experience
    with a hard drive on one of my computers. I was floored by the jump in
    speed and overall performance boost it gave the system.

    I remember thinking then: "Man, SEVENTY whole megabytes of disk space!
    I'll never ever have enough to fill that!" And to be honest, I don't
    think it ever got more than just over half full. Even with leeching
    off of the wustl.edu archive.

    Then I eventually got my first wintel box and realized that software
    bloat can really fill even a large drive. :)


    --
    --==< S m e g h e a d >==--
  16. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    "Smeghead" <tribesfan@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:4mpqt0ti7cm19n199c6ufp5d1jsni28vb1@4ax.com:

    > I remember thinking then: "Man, SEVENTY whole megabytes of disk space!
    > I'll never ever have enough to fill that!" And to be honest, I don't
    > think it ever got more than just over half full. Even with leeching
    > off of the wustl.edu archive.
    >
    > Then I eventually got my first wintel box and realized that software
    > bloat can really fill even a large drive. :)

    Ah, yes, Parkinson's Law: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkinson's_law

    On a clear disk you can seek forever.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 12:12:45 -0600, ScratchMonkey
    <scratchmonkey.blacklist@sewingwitch.com> wrote:

    >"Smeghead" <tribesfan@hotmail.com> wrote in
    >news:4mpqt0ti7cm19n199c6ufp5d1jsni28vb1@4ax.com:
    >
    >> I remember thinking then: "Man, SEVENTY whole megabytes of disk space!
    >> I'll never ever have enough to fill that!" And to be honest, I don't
    >> think it ever got more than just over half full. Even with leeching
    >> off of the wustl.edu archive.
    >>
    >> Then I eventually got my first wintel box and realized that software
    >> bloat can really fill even a large drive. :)
    >
    >Ah, yes, Parkinson's Law: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkinson's_law
    >
    >On a clear disk you can seek forever.

    It's funny to think that the 70MB drive I thought was so HUGE back in
    the day is 2,340 times smaller than what I have for HDD space on my
    current system. :)

    Does that mean in 15 years I'll have 288 gigs of RAM and 365TB of
    Crystal Access Drive space?

    --
    --==< S m e g h e a d >==--
  18. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    "Smeghead" <tribesfan@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:at5rt01jbn1no0at1tpdtctr243euarua2@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 12:12:45 -0600, ScratchMonkey
    > <scratchmonkey.blacklist@sewingwitch.com> wrote:
    >
    >>"Smeghead" <tribesfan@hotmail.com> wrote in
    >>news:4mpqt0ti7cm19n199c6ufp5d1jsni28vb1@4ax.com:
    >>
    >>> I remember thinking then: "Man, SEVENTY whole megabytes of disk space!
    >>> I'll never ever have enough to fill that!" And to be honest, I don't
    >>> think it ever got more than just over half full. Even with leeching
    >>> off of the wustl.edu archive.
    >>>
    >>> Then I eventually got my first wintel box and realized that software
    >>> bloat can really fill even a large drive. :)
    >>
    >>Ah, yes, Parkinson's Law: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkinson's_law
    >>
    >>On a clear disk you can seek forever.
    >
    > It's funny to think that the 70MB drive I thought was so HUGE back in
    > the day is 2,340 times smaller than what I have for HDD space on my
    > current system. :)
    >
    > Does that mean in 15 years I'll have 288 gigs of RAM and 365TB of
    > Crystal Access Drive space?
    >
    > --
    > --==< S m e g h e a d >==--

    I would be amazed with a 4 Ghz processor. For sure.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    Randy Graham wrote:

    > Better package management than anything else I've seen.

    Have you seen Debian's system?

    > Minimal
    > install possible. Only packages needed to run plus what you *WANT*
    > installed goes in. Very good to do a slimline Linux install.

    I got Debian running on a *very* old 80MB laptop harddrive, with 16 MB
    swap, and X installed (including twm, since anything larger wouldn't
    fit). And I hate about 15MB of spare space.

    Funny, how that is now so tiny as to be a rounding error :-)

    > Absolutely worth it. Although it didn't help when I was looking for
    > work in Myrtle Beach (hell, every damn computer related job there was
    > Windows), most times it is an extra leg up on similarly qualified
    > applicants.

    The company would think of it like this: It's an extra skill you have
    that they don't have to pay for.

    > I know it gave me a substantial salary advantage over all
    > my co-workers at my last job. And I do mean substantial - roughly 20%
    > over the 2nd best paid worker in the group. Although I suspect having
    > a much stronger background in networking than anyone else in the group
    > made up part of that pay advantage, too. When we interviewed new
    > people, those with Linux and Unix experience were always given
    > preference over similarly qualified applicants without such
    > experience.

    Linux has certainly taught me enough about networking to give me a
    leg-up over other students at my school (damnit, still not finished. A
    year or so and I should be done with my B.Sc., at which point I shall
    proceed to make money in earnest).

    --
    Frank
  20. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    Frank van Schie <frankNOSPAM@email.it> wrote in
    news:TaGdnZWOV4hIoHncRVnyhA@casema.nl:

    > And I hate about 15MB of spare space.

    Send it to me. I'll give it some love.

    > Linux has certainly taught me enough about networking to give me a
    > leg-up over other students at my school (damnit, still not finished. A
    > year or so and I should be done with my B.Sc., at which point I shall
    > proceed to make money in earnest).

    Linux in isolation isn't worth much, as it typically implies that someone
    figured out how to put the CD in the drive and get it loaded, which these
    days isn't much more difficult than loading Windows, and possibly even
    easier. (I'm not referring to getting it working with games and the
    bleeding-edge hardware they demand, though.) What's more interesting are
    the people who've used more than one OS, and aren't religious about any of
    them. Those are the ones who have useful perspectives and the potential to
    pick The Right Solution To Fit The Problem. I want to see someone who
    doesn't say "Linux roolz" but instead tells me exactly under what
    conditions each OS fails, and why I should still use it.
  21. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 12:41:20 -0600, ScratchMonkey
    <ScratchMonkey.blacklist@sewingwitch.com> wrote:

    >Frank van Schie <frankNOSPAM@email.it> wrote in
    >news:TaGdnZWOV4hIoHncRVnyhA@casema.nl:
    >
    >> And I hate about 15MB of spare space.
    >
    >Send it to me. I'll give it some love.
    >
    >> Linux has certainly taught me enough about networking to give me a
    >> leg-up over other students at my school (damnit, still not finished. A
    >> year or so and I should be done with my B.Sc., at which point I shall
    >> proceed to make money in earnest).
    >
    >Linux in isolation isn't worth much, as it typically implies that someone
    >figured out how to put the CD in the drive and get it loaded, which these
    >days isn't much more difficult than loading Windows, and possibly even
    >easier. (I'm not referring to getting it working with games and the
    >bleeding-edge hardware they demand, though.) What's more interesting are
    >the people who've used more than one OS, and aren't religious about any of
    >them. Those are the ones who have useful perspectives and the potential to
    >pick The Right Solution To Fit The Problem. I want to see someone who
    >doesn't say "Linux roolz" but instead tells me exactly under what
    >conditions each OS fails, and why I should still use it.

    And there are some zealots on any side of the fence. Rabid Unix and
    Mac users tend to be scary. The ones that hate anything MS or Gates
    related to the point they'll virtually cut off their own noses.

    --
    --==< S m e g h e a d >==--
  22. Archived from groups: alt.games.starsiege.tribes (More info?)

    ScratchMonkey's last words before the Sword of Azrial plunged through his
    body were:
    > Frank van Schie <frankNOSPAM@email.it> wrote in
    > news:TaGdnZWOV4hIoHncRVnyhA@casema.nl:
    >> And I hate about 15MB of spare space.
    > Send it to me. I'll give it some love.
    >> Linux has certainly taught me enough about networking to give me a
    >> leg-up over other students at my school (damnit, still not finished. A
    >> year or so and I should be done with my B.Sc., at which point I shall
    >> proceed to make money in earnest).
    > Linux in isolation isn't worth much, as it typically implies that someone
    > figured out how to put the CD in the drive and get it loaded, which these
    > days isn't much more difficult than loading Windows, and possibly even
    > easier. (I'm not referring to getting it working with games and the
    > bleeding-edge hardware they demand, though.) What's more interesting are
    > the people who've used more than one OS, and aren't religious about any of
    > them. Those are the ones who have useful perspectives and the potential to
    > pick The Right Solution To Fit The Problem. I want to see someone who
    > doesn't say "Linux roolz" but instead tells me exactly under what
    > conditions each OS fails, and why I should still use it.

    Personally, I have used all of the major OS's, and for the most part,
    still prefer staying with Linux for most of what I do. Most of my games
    work fine under Linux, due to ports, so dont really use windows too much.
    For games, Windows does have an edge, but really in a way, too buggy for
    online usage out of the box (no matter what version), due to the myriad
    of spyware/adaware/tupperware/malware and viruses. For graphics work,
    MacOS kicks ass, its really is superior due to higher resolutions, and the
    PPC chipsets that most macs have are faster than the average x86, however
    not many games are out there for it (although, an opensource community is
    opening up around it) and the hardware is more expensive. For graphics,
    the occaisional net surfer, and the like, I'd recommend Macs (especially
    with macs going for $500 now). For people who do play some games, and dont
    mind updating/scanning/fixing, go windows. For those who like tinkering,
    programming, etc Linux is the way to go. For servers, any *nix varient is
    my preference as how they usually have longer up times, and dont require
    restarts after updates.

    That what you want?
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