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I need a program that will stress all four cores on my Q6600.

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December 9, 2008 10:58:24 AM

I'm looking for a simple program to where I can run only one program to stress all four cores of my Q6600, please no running two of the same instants! I was having a hard time trying to install Orthos, I would extract the files to "My Documents", and its like it didn't do anything! I kept getting errors when trying to run Orthos. :fou:  What the h3ll is going on?Please help, Thank you.
a c 172 à CPUs
a c 197 K Overclocking
December 9, 2008 11:32:17 AM

Don't know. Most of us just run 4 instances of Prime95.
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December 9, 2008 12:02:52 PM

3ds max will stress all four cores during render. Not only does it render using all 4 but it uses them at 100% until the render is complete. Your vertices's / polygons have to be higher than a certain amount. It is the first program I've used that will stress all cores at 100% till the task is finished. I do not have a workstation card so most of the render utilizes the cpu. The render used was a 3d model of a jet turbine engine so the polys were high.
*this is not a simple program
December 9, 2008 12:14:08 PM

I'm curious why OP is so against running multiple instances of the same program? How 'bout CPU Burn-in?
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 9, 2008 12:14:28 PM

Run P95 4 instances.
December 9, 2008 12:29:56 PM

You can also run 8 half-instances of prime95.
December 9, 2008 12:50:38 PM

Or run Prime95 Small FFT. Version 25.6 or later scales to as many cores as specified.
December 9, 2008 7:29:51 PM

rodney_ws said:
I'm curious why OP is so against running multiple instances of the same program? How 'bout CPU Burn-in?


I just wanted the most up to date version of Prime95, I've been out of the loop (forum surfing at Tom's) for about a year. This is my brother computer build, his 2001 Dell has had it! :lol: 

Maybe you could lend me a hand at this HDD thread. :) 

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/247682-32-build-boots...
December 9, 2008 7:51:06 PM

The latest version of Prime95 that came out a month or two ago (ver 25) will stress all four cores without having to go through the gyrations of running four individual instances of the program. I guess they figured out how to have the single program automatically detect and assign work to each CPU.

Works like a charm on all seven computers I have it now installed on (one quad core, two dual cores, and four single cores). All processors are at 100% load.

You can find it at www.mersenne.org

MisfitSELF
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 9, 2008 11:59:16 PM

systemlord,

That explains why I haven't seen any posts from you for awhile. Welcome back. Good to see you again.

The latest version of Prime95 is 25.73 - http://mersenne.org/freesoft - which was very recently released October 6th. The download is about half way down the page.

This version, as well as the last several will automatically thread all 4 cores, so it's easy to use, and is the standard in the overclocking community for thermal and stability testing. Just remember that when Prime95 is run for the first time, select "Round off checking" so errors will be always be flagged as they occur.

Comp :sol: 
December 10, 2008 12:16:42 AM

Try IntelBurnTest. Hehe..
December 10, 2008 12:17:59 AM

IntelBurnTest
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 10, 2008 2:11:48 AM

zubai and easymoney9,

While Burn Test is useful as a quick preliminary "Easy Button" stability check, it is unsuitable for long term CPU stability testing or thermal testing.

As the author of the Core 2 Quad and Duo Temperature Guide - http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/221745-29-core-quad-t... - here at Tom's, allow me to explain why Prime95 Small FFT's is the standard for stability and thermal testing in the overclocking community.

Prime95 Small FFT's maintains the steady-state 100% workload required for consistent CPU testing, and does not oscillate between high and low workloads, nor does it load all registers with all one's, which produces unrealistically high temperatures @ 115% workload.

You can get a similar explanation from the author of Real Temp, Kevin Glynn, (unclewebb) over at XtremeSystems - http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=17... - where there's a 113 page thread detailing the ongoing development of Real Temp, much of which revolves around CPU load testing.

The proof is in observing CPU and Core thermal signatures, which react directly to workload, as shown below using SpeedFan "Charts".


Prime95 Small FFT's:



Prime95 Blend:



Burn Test:




I hope this helps you to understand the differences, and why Prime95 Small FFT's remains the CPU testing standard.

Comp :sol: 
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 10, 2008 2:30:27 AM

Yes I noticed that while running Linpack (or IntelBurnTest/LinX) the CPU temperature drops significantly between each iteration, as the start of each run seems to be quite light on load.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 10, 2008 2:38:13 AM

Hi Rando,

Yes, this is precisely why unclewebb relies exclusively on Prime95 Small FFT's for load testing, as well as the Cool Down test in Real Temp.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 10, 2008 2:51:13 AM

The cool down test was a stroke of genius :) 
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 10, 2008 2:53:15 AM

I agree 100%. Absolutely brilliant!
December 10, 2008 4:13:22 AM

Comp, what about Orthos? runs the same sort of calculations as Prime95 i believe.

In any case, none of those programs are realistic in temperatures, i believe Folding@home to be most accurate to everyday apps. however i still use Orthos because F@H has downtimes and isn't completely consistent..
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 10, 2008 4:19:04 AM

Orthos is OK for Dual Cores, but won't automatically thread a Quad, which is what the OP systemlord was having difficulty with, and again brings us back to Prime95.
December 10, 2008 4:56:20 AM

CompuTronix said:
systemlord,

That explains why I haven't seen any posts from you for awhile. Welcome back. Good to see you again.


Hi CompuTronix, yeah I've been doing Lots of outdoor activity lately. Two of my projects that make use of more computer technology than you might think! Let the pictures do all the talking. :D 










December 10, 2008 5:05:56 AM

:lol:  is that a LN2 pot on top of 1st and 2nd? jk :p 

i hope
a b à CPUs
December 10, 2008 5:11:18 AM

Nope. It's a heatsink for a nitromethane burning 2 stroke engine.

The cylinder is inside of that.


(Are those Unlimited Engineering parts btw?)
December 10, 2008 8:01:00 AM

^wow. this rocket scientist really knows his ****...
December 10, 2008 10:14:27 AM

cjl said:
Are those Unlimited Engineering parts btw?


They all are except for the bulkheads and differential's, this pretty SuperMax has seen some serious action! I re-polish it every few years, go off big jumps. Just recently I bent my front titanium hing pins (all four) so I made some of my own from ultra hardened steel that will snap instead of bending. Those grooves are there for the set screws, no more e-clips.


a b à CPUs
December 10, 2008 5:13:00 PM

Very nice. That's some serious cash there - I've drooled over the UE stuff before, but never had quite that kind of money to drop on my RC stuff.
December 10, 2008 7:57:14 PM

cjl said:
Very nice. That's some serious cash there - I've drooled over the UE stuff before, but never had quite that kind of money to drop on my RC stuff.


Easily $6000.- in both the helicoptor and Supermaxx, can you imagine what kind of computer build that would buy!??!
December 11, 2008 4:31:21 AM

^one that could play crysis at like - 10 fps! :lol: 
December 11, 2008 5:08:41 AM

Crysis or 3DMark Vantage (I think).
!