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Core 2 H9300 ( 6 cores ) available ?

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May 6, 2008 1:16:50 AM

I found a place that sales a 6 core Intel Core 2 Hex H9300 for 415 Euro here

http://www.matsoukasbros.com/uploads1/d_H9300.pdf

How come I google the specific model and there is no Info about this model.

...and it's for socket LGA 775.

Does anybody have a clue on the subject? I find the processor ideal, taking in account the price for 6 cores, for video encoding and 3d rendering (3ds Max).

:bounce: 

More about : core h9300 cores

May 6, 2008 1:24:36 AM

Hello scam!

What's not wrong with that ad? Six core will have a completely different socket, and won't be available until, at earliest, the end of the year for the server sector.

Google Dunnington.
a c 127 à CPUs
May 6, 2008 1:25:13 AM

Yea its Intels Hexcore CPU. Set to be released before Nehalem for LGA775. Its supposed to be "naitive" hex as well not 3 dual cores glued together.

If 3DSMAX does scale with more cores then this would probably increase performance by a lot. But it could be hot as well.

Too bad there isnt very many details on it yet. I wounder if a P35 would support it............

BTW I forgot a link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xeon#Dunnington_-_with_6_c...
Related resources
May 6, 2008 1:28:15 AM

I wish they'd keep LGA775!
a c 127 à CPUs
May 6, 2008 1:29:43 AM

badgtx1969 said:
I wish they'd keep LGA775!


Agreed but its impossible with the IMC and more than 4 cores. But hey after this it should be easier on socket changes for Intel as the IMC will always be on board. It will just need a new one for different memory types i.e. DDR4+
May 6, 2008 1:31:32 AM

If Intel's homepage doesn't have an entry for H9300 there isn't one. It's either a scam or a prank. Note how there's no product code in the specsheet and how all the changed details are red.
Also note how the HEX font is diffrent from the Core 2 font. :D 
May 6, 2008 1:32:13 AM

badgtx1969 said:
Hello scam!

What's not wrong with that ad? Six core will have a completely different socket, and won't be available until, at earliest, the end of the year for the server sector.

Google Dunnington.


Yes probably. Now that i see the date posted it must be an April's fool. Very lame of an eshop to do such a thing.

http://www.matsoukasbros.com

Sorry for wasting your time. :( 
a c 127 à CPUs
May 6, 2008 2:03:29 AM

Funny thing is that may have been a scam but the CPU itself is not. There was a post somewhere here with a roadmap showing it. Wish I could find it. And this was back in Feb/Mar time.
May 6, 2008 2:20:23 AM

i think u would need a socket for that cpu so i would think its a scam. y would anyone need 6cores when quad cores r barely being used i think companies should work hard on drivers with current hardware.
May 6, 2008 4:30:38 AM

jimmysmitty said:
Agreed but its impossible with the IMC and more than 4 cores. But hey after this it should be easier on socket changes for Intel as the IMC will always be on board. It will just need a new one for different memory types i.e. DDR4+


I'll be surprised if it's easier on socket changes with Intel. Even when they keep the same socket, they change voltages. I used to get mad about that back in the Prescott days, but not anymore.

With AMD, they keep the same socket for backwards compatibility and let motherboard manufacturer's nix the support. :lol:  When they need a new voltage, they leave it up to the motherboard manufacturer's goodwill again.

In my SF tech fantasy, we'd have a universal socket that didn't rely upon pins on either the motherboard, or the CPU, but upon materials that would autoshape to the CPU as current is applied. Call it the universal socket 7000 or something!

I came up with that notion when I read about research on how futuristic metals would morph as current passes through.

a b à CPUs
May 6, 2008 7:38:09 AM

yipsl said:
In my SF tech fantasy, we'd have a universal socket that didn't rely upon pins on either the motherboard, or the CPU, but upon materials that would autoshape to the CPU as current is applied. Call it the universal socket 7000 or something!


QUICK!

http://www.ipo.gov.uk/patent.htm
a c 127 à CPUs
May 6, 2008 1:42:01 PM

yipsl said:
I'll be surprised if it's easier on socket changes with Intel. Even when they keep the same socket, they change voltages. I used to get mad about that back in the Prescott days, but not anymore.

With AMD, they keep the same socket for backwards compatibility and let motherboard manufacturer's nix the support. :lol:  When they need a new voltage, they leave it up to the motherboard manufacturer's goodwill again.

In my SF tech fantasy, we'd have a universal socket that didn't rely upon pins on either the motherboard, or the CPU, but upon materials that would autoshape to the CPU as current is applied. Call it the universal socket 7000 or something!

I came up with that notion when I read about research on how futuristic metals would morph as current passes through.


I understand why you are worried from past experiences. But you forget that the major voltage change was the only time you had to get a new mobo for a new chipset, not socket. So far for LGA 775 this only effected the 915 and lower chipsets with the move to Core2 as they were not created to handle them. So in real terms there has only been 2 changes. It is also up to mobo makers when it comes to Intel to create a mobo that has the voltage regulators and the new BIOS with microcode to support newer CPUs. I.E. there are Asus mobos with the P945 chipset that support Wolfdales/Yorkfeilds.

AMD does do that but their main problem is promising it will work, like with whats happening with Phenom. Yes its the mobo makers fault really as they slack on updating the BIOS with the new CPUs microcodes or having decent phase regulators on the mobo. But still AMD puts themselves in the crossfire by saying it will have seamless upgrade path when that may not be 100% true.

Your idea is nice but the problem right now is the different architectures require more or less connections. Intel has LGA775 for all their current CPUs and AMD has PGA (I believe) 940 for all its current CPUs and their future ones.

Morphing metal would be scary though. Thats just one step closer to the T2000 from Terminator. Mix that kind of metal with the right circutry and a good jolt of electricity and BAM. Skynet comes to life and we are screwed.
May 9, 2008 2:22:29 AM

Don't worry, we can handle Skynet. After all, I've also read about artificial muscle that contracts with current. Add direct brain wave control for pilots and we'd have Battlemechs to face off against Skynet!

The Singularity is coming. It's described as the Rapture for nerds. Sort of has me worried, but then again, I'm an evangelical Jewish Christian Baptist Universalist. We worry about the kind of things secular futurists flat out ignore.

What we can hope for is that our machines will screw up just as much as we do. Instead of accidentally creating the Terminator, when we're trying to build Robby, we'll probably end up with Marvin. Who can be scared of Marvin? :) 

As for AMD promises, I think you're too hard on AMD and too soft on Intel. Motherboard support varies by manufacturer, regardless of socket or chipset. Intel's made dodgier promises in the past and I bet you gave them a pass.

Criticize AMD for the Phenom, not for motherboard compatibility with the Phenom. That's my point of view.
a c 127 à CPUs
May 9, 2008 1:20:16 PM

yipsl you make a good point but as I said Intel has never once promised support for every chip in a certain chipset. AMD has always made the upgradeability claim and in order to do that you need to push the mobo makers. AMD, or AMD fanboys really, use that as a reason to buy AMD.

I am not being soft on Intel or hard on AMD. I am just stating a fact that AMD pushes their ability to upgrade easily but it falls on them when mobo makers fail to help make that even semi true.

I think AMD should claim that their CPUs are able to work in older sockets but they should have a warning as well that states its up to the mobo maker to provide the BIOS update for it. That would help them get out of the frying pan.

I think Intel does plan on the same path as AMD with one socket until there is truly a need for change. Thats the thing though. We all know AMD will not be able to stick to the same socket forever and will need a change some day. Its just the way it is.
May 9, 2008 1:40:15 PM

Just a small lesson of socket history. Im just gonna start by the Socket A/Sckt 370.


AMD

Socket 7
From the first K5 to K6 II 8 Ancient History (Basicly from 550mhz to below, im excluding sck3 386/486 clones that was used but I386 and I486, and Texas and Cyrix Cpus.)

Socket A
From Duron 600 Mhz to Athlon Xp 3200+

Intel

Slot 1
From Pentium II 350Mhz to Pentium III 600Mhz

Socket 370

From Pentium III 500Mhz to Pentium III Tualatin 1400 Mhz

Socket 423
From P4 1.3Ghz to P4 1,8Ghz

Socket 478
From P4 1,8Ghz to 2.8Ghz

Socket 775
From 3.0 to Now.

History tends alot to repeat itself. Amd have been changing sockets alot this last two years with 754/939/AMD+. but i think its a trend that will stop soon. Its a just a trend, like the longevity of Sckt 775 Intel.

Just a tip of history jimmy :) 
a c 127 à CPUs
May 9, 2008 2:00:35 PM

Oh I know the socket changes. But you still need to add in the 754/939/940/AM2 since that has happened over time with AMD. Its pretty much the same each way but AMD has been changing sockets more often than Intel recently.

I still think it will be easier for Intel to run on the same socket for a bit with Nehalem until probably Sandy Bridge. 32+ cores would seem to need a different socket.
a b à CPUs
May 9, 2008 3:31:05 PM

You forgot 940 / 754 / 939 / AM2 (940 Mark II).

Lets be fair ... Intel changed ponies a lot at the beginning of the race and ... then AMD saw the value in mobo upgrades (as well) for increased sales ... they then went through a few ponies while in front ... then suddenly got overtaken by the opposition's Supercharged Donkey ... despite being on an purebred (second generation) Arabian ... with four very short (then 3) legs.

Sometimes the best looking horse gets beaten by the brumby.

I must say they both defended their socket changes with solid reasons ... if you have a read ... all in the name of speed, thermals, need for better grounding for communication ... there seems to have been sufficient justification.

I do think 754 was a mongrel of an idea ... just pure marketing scam.

939 to AM2 likewise ... one pin ... Pffft !! Tossers !!

The first 940 was server tho .... Intel did the same with Zeon.

Neither have really any advantage or can be argued as treating the customer better ... perhaps Intel has been better of late ... tho

Don't forget under the mobo issue is the more painful issue with chipsets for many - many Intel mobo owners have had to upgrade mobo's ... the chipset didn't support the latest Pentium D ... then Core2 ... then Penryn.

AMD while perhaps seeming better off with AM2 still have annoyed many who can't get Phenom to work on their AM2 mobo either ... or the 125W X2's are just too much to run with the power regs on the earlier boards.

Plus the HT3 debacle.

Keeping a mobo beyond one CPU upgrade has become more due to luck for many than good planning of late.

May 13, 2008 10:33:34 AM

Reynod said:

Keeping a mobo beyond one CPU upgrade has become more due to luck for many than good planning of late.


Well, I will say that with our old Northwood i865PERL board, it went through 2 CPU upgrades.

1. Celeron 2.6 (a budget issue to afford the whole build)

2. P4 2.8 Northwood 533 fsb.

It is dodgier nowadays. I expected more from the 690G beyond a B2 Phenom at best. I'd already gotten an ASUS 780G board for our son with a cheap X2 4200+, but I decided to actually move my X2 4600+ to a Gigabyte 780G board, and get my wife an X2 4600+ on another ASUS 780G so we can use the X2 3800+ and 690G for an HTPC.

My goal is to go 8750 after our summer vacation and then wait out Deneb SOI for non SOI second generation Deneb. I can't see AMD delivering anything much better than an 8750 overclockable to 2.8 without voltage changes.

So, the stuff's due to arrive from Newegg tomorrow and I'll do the work next weekend. I hope the 780G's can handle 3 CPU upgrades, counting the X2 4600+. My personal sweet spot is a 2.4 gigahertz CPU in any generation with 2.8 as the ideal.

That works for me.

And I wasn't going to spend any stimulus package on upgrades, but Newegg is just too easy to click on. Not like I have to schlepp over to Fry's on a Saturday afternoon hoping to catch the weekly bundles (I hate ECS mobos anyways). I ordered 4 gigs DDR2 800 ram to replace the 2 gigs DDR2 667 too.
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