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Can I use a Hughes Satellite Dish for an antenna?

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Anonymous
July 30, 2005 4:39:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Moved into a house that has a Hughes satellite dish mounted near the roof
line. The house is wired for both satellite and cable. I've opted for
cable for now. However, I'm curious to know if I could use the existing
satellite dish (in conjunction with a tuner) as an antenna to pick up local
TV stations.

In my area, Time Warner Cable is not permitted to carry the HD signals of
the Sinclair Broadcasting FOX and ABC affiliates. I'm frustrated by the
limited HD options and would like to purchase a tuner to use with my Sony
projection system. The projection system is located in the basement of the
house and I would have very easy access to the coax going to the dish.
Mounting an actual antenna outside would require a bit of additional effort.
Any advice appreciated. Thanks.
Anonymous
July 30, 2005 5:31:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

nospam@myhouse.com wrote in
news:m%zGe.42230$zY4.26363@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com:

> Moved into a house that has a Hughes satellite dish mounted near the
> roof line. The house is wired for both satellite and cable. I've
> opted for cable for now. However, I'm curious to know if I could use
> the existing satellite dish (in conjunction with a tuner) as an
> antenna to pick up local TV stations.

The dish itself will be of no real help. But you might be able to mount an
outdoor UHF antenna where the dish is now located and use the existing RG6
to bring the signal into your ATSC tuner.

Just make sure you know what actual channels are involved and where the
transmitters are with respect to your intended mounting spot.

--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667

A false witness is worse than no witness at all.
God is an evolutionist.
Anonymous
July 30, 2005 6:43:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Thank you for the input I appreciate it.

If Time Warner can't resolve their impasse with Sinclair, I'll want to do
something to secure the high def signal from the local Fox and ABC
affiliates.

Thanks again.
Related resources
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 12:03:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sat, 30 Jul 2005 00:39:46 GMT nospam@myhouse.com wrote:

| In my area, Time Warner Cable is not permitted to carry the HD signals of
| the Sinclair Broadcasting FOX and ABC affiliates. I'm frustrated by the

Did they (TWC) tell you that? Did they say why? I'm just curious to add
this info to info I will be sending to my congressperson. I'm wondering
if a broader "must carry" rule would be useful.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Phil Howard KA9WGN | http://linuxhomepage.com/ http://ham.org/ |
| (first name) at ipal.net | http://phil.ipal.org/ http://ka9wgn.ham.org/ |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 12:04:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sat, 30 Jul 2005 13:31:40 GMT Dave Oldridge <doldridg@leavethisoutshaw.ca> wrote:

| The dish itself will be of no real help. But you might be able to mount an
| outdoor UHF antenna where the dish is now located and use the existing RG6
| to bring the signal into your ATSC tuner.

Why would the dish be of no help? Is it too small for UHF?

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Phil Howard KA9WGN | http://linuxhomepage.com/ http://ham.org/ |
| (first name) at ipal.net | http://phil.ipal.org/ http://ka9wgn.ham.org/ |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 12:04:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

> Why would the dish be of no help? Is it too small for UHF?

Yes , and a ku-band LNB and feed point would not work either.

UHF 470 - 862 MHz
KU-band 11.7-12.7 GHz

MHz, equal to 1,000,000 Hz or 0.001 GHz.

Here is a 6' UHF Parabolic Antenna
http://www.lindsayelec.com/antenna/commercial.catv/6-pb...

So you could make a new feed point for the 18" Satellite dish and get it to
work but the gain over a flat reflector would not be much, best bet for a
small UHF antenna would be something like this:
http://www.lashen.com/vendors/winegard/uhf_antennas.asp
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 2:26:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

The issue is fairly well known to any people that live in areas served by
TWC and Sinclair. Google the topic and you'll get enough hits to fill in
all of the details. Sinclair wants additional $s from companies carrying
their high def signals. Those "companies" (TWC and DirectTV among others)
don't want to pay for carrying network broadcasts fearing it will set a bad
precedent. I live in Columbus Ohio (Sinclair owns both ABC 6 and Fox 28).
The same issue is in (from my understanding) nearly every market that
Sinclair serves.
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 10:13:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Stanley Reynolds wrote:

>>Why would the dish be of no help? Is it too small for UHF?
>
>
> Yes , and a ku-band LNB and feed point would not work either.
>
> UHF 470 - 862 MHz
> KU-band 11.7-12.7 GHz
>
> MHz, equal to 1,000,000 Hz or 0.001 GHz.
>
> Here is a 6' UHF Parabolic Antenna
> http://www.lindsayelec.com/antenna/commercial.catv/6-pb...
>
> So you could make a new feed point for the 18" Satellite dish and get it to
> work but the gain over a flat reflector would not be much, best bet for a
> small UHF antenna would be something like this:
> http://www.lashen.com/vendors/winegard/uhf_antennas.asp
>
>
>
>
Will those antennas work everywhere?
tia
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 5:42:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

phil-news-nospam@ipal.net wrote in news:D cgmgo124gb@news3.newsguy.com:

> On Sat, 30 Jul 2005 13:31:40 GMT Dave Oldridge
> <doldridg@leavethisoutshaw.ca> wrote:
>
>| The dish itself will be of no real help. But you might be able to
>| mount an outdoor UHF antenna where the dish is now located and use
>| the existing RG6 to bring the signal into your ATSC tuner.
>
> Why would the dish be of no help? Is it too small for UHF?

Basically, they are and the LNB at the feedpoint is usually a small horn
antenna aimed into the dish and tuned to 12,000mhz or thereabouts, whereas
for UHF TV, you want 470-800MHz roughly.

A small 12ghz dish just won't focus well at such a long wavelength, as they
are usually designed with a fairly short focal length.


--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667

A false witness is worse than no witness at all.
God is an evolutionist.
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 5:47:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Bill Smith <Smith@AOL.com> wrote in news:n_ZGe.70447$5V4.65672@pd7tw3no:

> Stanley Reynolds wrote:
>
>>>Why would the dish be of no help? Is it too small for UHF?
>>
>>
>> Yes , and a ku-band LNB and feed point would not work either.
>>
>> UHF 470 - 862 MHz
>> KU-band 11.7-12.7 GHz
>>
>> MHz, equal to 1,000,000 Hz or 0.001 GHz.
>>
>> Here is a 6' UHF Parabolic Antenna
>> http://www.lindsayelec.com/antenna/commercial.catv/6-pb...
>>
>> So you could make a new feed point for the 18" Satellite dish and get
>> it to work but the gain over a flat reflector would not be much, best
>> bet for a small UHF antenna would be something like this:
>> http://www.lashen.com/vendors/winegard/uhf_antennas.asp
>>
>>
>>
>>
> Will those antennas work everywhere?

In order to "work," an antenna needs to be intercepting a large enough
and clean enough signal. Antenna designers work on both aspects by
making the antenna directional. The more directional an antenna is, the
less noise it receives from off-axis points and the fewer reflections it
receives from signals bounced off of extraneous objects. Either raw
noise or reflections can disrupt digital reception. In the first case,
there simply is not enough signal to drown out the thermal noise of the
antenna and the receiver front end. In the second, there are too many
copies of the signal arriving, at differing times, to be easily decoded.

By making the antenna directional, the antenna designer improves the
signal-to-noise ratio and eliminates off-axis copies of the signal from
reflected paths. The trade-off is straightforward usually. The more
directional the antenna, the bigger it is. Yagi antennas have more
directivity, the longer you make them. Reflectors, whether plane, corner
or parabolic have similar considerations.


--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667

A false witness is worse than no witness at all.
God is an evolutionist.
!