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Faulty HD

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June 2, 2009 2:56:46 PM

Well guys heres the problem, I have one SSD HD 32GB from Corsair and one Seagate Barracuda 500GB at 7200.11rpm, from the day that I bought the Seagate everything was working ok until today, I switched off my pc went downstairs to eat and when I came and booted up the PC, it couldn't go any further than just the POST BIOS screen, i checked everything , reseted BIOS etc and I figured out that without the Barracuda drive the PC loads everything and continues. My question is , is the barracuda dead? I had it only for my files and games. How can I recover those files again?? (The OS is installed on the SSD)

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a b G Storage
June 2, 2009 11:19:10 PM

Quote:
I switched off my pc went downstairs to eat and when I came and booted up the PC, it couldn't go any further than just the POST BIOS screen, i checked everything , reseted BIOS etc and I figured out that without the Barracuda drive the PC loads everything and continues.

Where about in the process of POST does it hang? Make sure you turn off the silly logo screen during POST via BIOS to see the entire process.

I have a feeling the hanging occurs when the BIOS is trying to detect the Seagate and has trouble doing so, taking excessively long time.
June 3, 2009 6:17:35 AM

I did that to, the BIOS reads the processor and the 2gigs of RAM but no further, it couldn't move on to show the other installed devices.After removing the barracuda everything was loaded.
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a b G Storage
June 3, 2009 7:57:21 AM

Test it on another computer to confirm it's faulty. Normally straight after doing quick test on RAM is SATA/IDE detection and that's where it hangs of course, so by the sound of things the HDD is mostly likely the culprit.

How important is the data on it? It's likely data recovery service might cost as much or more than what the 500GB is worth today on market. Ring up locally to find out.
June 3, 2009 9:57:01 AM

I tested the hard drive on other PC but the same problem.Well the data were not high priced. I checked on Seagate's website and the Hard drive model that I have is from the faulty series, so Hmmm they have the option to Flash the F/W of this drive using a bootable ISO image. I'll give it a try and post comments as soon as I finish flashing the F/W.
a b G Storage
June 3, 2009 10:05:46 AM

The downloaded firmware update/solution from Seagate can only prevent, but not solve already faulty drives unfortunately. My four ST31000340AS (7200.11 1TB) with SD15 firmware were affected by it and before any of them failed I was able to flash them all to SD1A luckily.
If the problem is caused by the above said firmware fault then it should be much cheaper for data recovery as they can solve it quickly.

If you want to try solving it yourselves here are the instructions: http://www.msfn.org/board/index.php?showtopic=128807
It involves building a serial cable (RS232 to TTL) to directly flash the firmware and is not recommended for the faint hearted.
a b G Storage
June 3, 2009 6:47:20 PM

Seagate is fixing that issue now, you can send your drive in.I had no luck flashing mine with the bootable cd you mention wuzy.

Staying away from Seagate from now on.
a b G Storage
June 3, 2009 10:37:24 PM

festerovic said:
Seagate is fixing that issue now, you can send your drive in.I had no luck flashing mine with the bootable cd you mention wuzy.

As I've already said, bootable image downloaded from Seagate does not work on already failed drives. The manual flashing through serial cable method does work for a failed drive however if administered properly.


festerovic said:
Staying away from Seagate from now on.

That's typical human weakness. A particular product from a company can fail in mass quantity, it could happen to any company's QA department.
What matters is their aftermarket support for said failed product, which Seagate has dealt with it relatively well. And of course the best way is to prevent purchasing known faulty product if possible, not the entire product range from the single company. By locking out a brand you're only locking yourself out.
a b G Storage
June 3, 2009 11:58:14 PM

You don't need to avoid Seagate forever. The real problem was not that driver were faulty but how upper management dealt with the fault this time around. They decided to throw SOP out the window and rush firmware updates to the public that weren't tested properly. Seagate NEVER make firmware updates public without contacting customer service first except in this particular case, which bit them in the rear.
a b G Storage
June 8, 2009 4:28:49 PM

wuzy said:
What matters is their aftermarket support for said failed product, which Seagate has dealt with it relatively well.


I disagree, I think the way they handled it was shoddy. There is a 50 page thread on their customer service board, I'm sure you've seen it. My drive hasn't failed yet, and multiple versions of the bootable cd didn't work, tried from multiple pcs. They should have offered replacement drives for the affected series, not just offer "we'll be happy to help, just after you jump through a bunch of hoops."
a b G Storage
June 8, 2009 9:43:24 PM

Well... *scuttles away*

I have seen the pain some of those customers in that thread went through... I didn't...

On the scale of logic it still does not make sense to avoid one brand just because of one product. That rule is clearly defined for me.



Have you tried ubootnetin to place the 1.44MB img file extracted from Seagate's ISO (it's in the hidden [Boot] folder) onto a USB flash drive and this make it bootable?
That's how I did mine, and not wasting blank DVDs (I had no CDs around).
!