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How much damage did I just do?

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April 9, 2008 5:15:19 AM

this is rather long but i want to explain what happened in detail in hopes that somebody can tell me how screwed i am. I know the obvious answer is it's not good but i'd like to know realistically what i should do if i need to have a powerful working computer which i plan to overclock.

specs

Antec Sonata III 500 Black
GIGABYTE GA-P35-DS3L
Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600
ZALMAN CNPS9700 LED 110mm 2 Ball CPU Cooler
2X GeIL 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800
XFX GEForce 8600GT

I had just finished building my new computer and turned it on for the first time. i bought everything with quiet in mind yet it was fairly loud. upon further examination i realized it was the fan on the XFX GE8600GT so I went on NewEgg to try and determine if other people thought it was loud too. sure enough others did and one guy mentioned that he pulled the power on the fan and it was quiet (i'd hope so!). This lead me to believe that he was running it without the fan. so for at least the time being while i was measuring the noise, i was going to do the same until i exchanged this for a quieter card.

let me stop here to point out that i'm not a gamer and have never worked with a graphics card with a fan on it. I work in IT and have built many boxes throughout the years so I'm not a noob, just not up on all the latest and greatest.

anyway, i had just finished installing vista on the machine and was loading the chipset drivers when i decided to start a copy process on my other computer. i only have one monitor so i unplugged the DVI from the new computer and plugged it into my old computer to do the job. about 5 minutes later i smelled the horrible stench of the start of an electrical fire.

I immediately pulled the plug on the new computer and opened the cover to investigate...the ps, cpu, and mem were all cool but the video card was pretty hot. i decided to plug the fan back in, let it cool down, and try again.

When i turned it back on, things got even worse...smoke started coming out of my motherboard!!

I immediately turned it off again, took everything apart, and put it all back together again (without anything i didn't need). Once again I turned it on and immediately the motherboard starts to smoke...I also noticed that there was a glow coming from underneath the board just to the left of where the PS plugs into the board.

Now I take the board out and look at the bottom and sure enough it's charred a bit underneath the floppy drive port which is next to the PS interface.

I decide to try once more, this time without the videocard, and it ran just fine.

So I'm assuming I killed the card. but I think, based on it running ok without that card in, that the computer will boot when i get another video card.

so here are my questions.

1) is it possible to kill that card that quickly? I only ran it without the fan for 20 minutes or so and it wasn't even all that hot to the touch when I first smelled the fire.

2) if i did fry that card, is that whole PCI-E 16X slot fried too?

3) if I can get another card and everything seemingly works fine, should i be concerned about anything? IOW, would the CPU/Memory/PS have been affected by this incident?

4) is it possible for a motherboard to smoke like that and still be ok or should i seriously think about getting a new one?

I feel like such an idiot and wish i could take the last hour back but I can't...any help is really appreciated.

More about : damage

April 9, 2008 6:28:19 AM

Take the vid card out of your secondary computer and hook it up in the new one and see what happens. The fact that you're running the D3 model mobo may be your saving grace here.

Lesson learned. Don't unplug any more fans.
April 9, 2008 6:29:40 AM

I would rma and claim i dont know what the hell happened, and see if they send back my old card, or a new one. If you actually saw glowing you fried something good, and chances are its going to effect you sooner or later. Just claim ignorance, sure its not totally honest, but niether are the prices you just paid for your comp. If you get the parts back, and they were actually replaced with new ones, grab A. a case of beer. B. a friend who knows newer setups on computers. And finally C. Have a few beers, explain your situation, and have your friend double check what you have going on before you power up.
Related resources
April 9, 2008 7:35:24 AM

I fried a new rig pretty good once overvolting the processor and messing around with my brand new Radeon 9800XT. After the smell of burned silicon cleared and I had identified all the brown scorch marks (one mark scorched the inside of my case brown) I just started dissassembling the system, found the boxes and started RMAing.
April 9, 2008 9:44:05 AM

The part getting hot was away from the card? That's not a good sign, the old AGP spec slots with newer cards would burn traces right through the board, I did it twice before figuring out what was happening.

If it works with another card, it should be fine though. I agree with the others, try RMA'ing the card and whatever else.
April 9, 2008 10:13:18 AM

Is it possible that the mobo shorted to the case due to a loose screw/missplaced standoff between the mobo and mobo tray. That would explain the smoke from the mobo...
April 9, 2008 1:47:54 PM

Sounds very odd to me.

Why would disconnecting a graphics card fan cause the motherboard to fry like that in what appears to be an area unrelated to the graphics sub-system?

Have I missed something obvious or does it sound like the mobo just blew up and this has nothing to do with the graphics card?
April 9, 2008 2:20:56 PM

I think you hosed both the video card and the motherboard.
April 9, 2008 2:48:46 PM

Honestly, Just RMA it and call it a DOA. (Dead on Arrival). Everyting. Except the PSU i guess. The rest might not be totaly damaged, but hell, aint good .
April 9, 2008 3:40:10 PM

Thanks for the all the replies people.

jkflipflop98 said:
Take the vid card out of your secondary computer and hook it up in the new one and see what happens. The fact that you're running the D3 model mobo may be your saving grace here.

Lesson learned. Don't unplug any more fans.


My secondary computer has an AGP card which this board doesn't support so i'd have to buy another one...which is fine but i don't want to plug that in to a slot that's fried and screw up another video card.

Kari said:
Is it possible that the mobo shorted to the case due to a loose screw/missplaced standoff between the mobo and mobo tray. That would explain the smoke from the mobo...


that's exactly what i thought when i saw the glow coming from under the board so i disassembled and checked and there was nothing...also notice that it runs fine without the graphics card in...

Maximus_Delta said:
Sounds very odd to me.

Why would disconnecting a graphics card fan cause the motherboard to fry like that in what appears to be an area unrelated to the graphics sub-system?

Have I missed something obvious or does it sound like the mobo just blew up and this has nothing to do with the graphics card?


honestly, i really do think (and hope) that's what happened...everything was working fine and then all the sudden things went to sh**. Like people have already said, how could overheating a video card make the board smoke like that? and in all honesty, the other times i turned the computer on, the video card was at room temperature. My best guess is that something happened to the PCI-E 16X slot that caused all this.

radnor said:
Honestly, Just RMA it and call it a DOA. (Dead on Arrival). Everyting. Except the PSU i guess. The rest might not be totaly damaged, but hell, aint good .


Well that's certainly what I'd like to do but how the heck can I RMA everything? What would I tell them. I bought everything through newegg and while they're good about returns, I'm a little worried about the burn mark on the underside of the board.


Any help is greatly appreciated.
April 9, 2008 3:49:35 PM

Well, you could RMA the board and card and say that the board was bad and fried the card. I'm still not 100% convinced that the card is dead, though. The card gets most (or all) of its power through the Mobo. If the PCI-E power system failed/shorted, then the card in would cause smoke and the card out would be no smoke. So, it seems quite likely that your fanless running may not have been the cause. When the board fried, though, it may have taken the card down with it too.
April 9, 2008 4:12:31 PM

EXT64 said:
Well, you could RMA the board and card and say that the board was bad and fried the card. I'm still not 100% convinced that the card is dead, though. The card gets most (or all) of its power through the Mobo. If the PCI-E power system failed/shorted, then the card in would cause smoke and the card out would be no smoke. So, it seems quite likely that your fanless running may not have been the cause. When the board fried, though, it may have taken the card down with it too.


thanks for the reply. I'm debating between doing that or just saying DOA...the problem is I read on the reviews section of newegg that they refer you to the manufacturer if there are burns so if i tell them what you said (which is the truth) i might get stuck having to do that. If i RMA it DOA then I run the risk of them finding out that it's burnt and sending it back to me which sucks too.

here's the other thing...if the board were fried, why would it run fine without the video card (i.e. turn on, run all the fans, look from an external point of view as if everything is fine)?
April 9, 2008 4:17:51 PM

Here's my advice for the future. Whenever dealing with new components or newly OCed components use something like Everest from Lavalys that has component sensors. They're not wholly accurate, but it gives you an idea. But as for what you should do now, I'm unsure, I've never been in that situation before.
April 9, 2008 4:27:26 PM

two bit hit said:
Here's my advice for the future. Whenever dealing with new components or newly OCed components use something like Everest from Lavalys that has component sensors. They're not wholly accurate, but it gives you an idea. But as for what you should do now, I'm unsure, I've never been in that situation before.


I hadn't even gotten to the point of OCing yet.
April 9, 2008 5:01:28 PM

Don't mix and match old VGA/mobo and new VGA/mobo, you may fry the new part. Replace both and move on, a relatively cheap lesson in the scheme of life.
April 9, 2008 5:41:12 PM

sean1017 said:
thanks for the reply. I'm debating between doing that or just saying DOA...the problem is I read on the reviews section of newegg that they refer you to the manufacturer if there are burns so if i tell them what you said (which is the truth) i might get stuck having to do that. If i RMA it DOA then I run the risk of them finding out that it's burnt and sending it back to me which sucks too.

here's the other thing...if the board were fried, why would it run fine without the video card (i.e. turn on, run all the fans, look from an external point of view as if everything is fine)?


Should. Plug a PS2 KB, and see if the Leds flash when you power up. POST will check the PS2 connections, so you will know of the board is doing Self Test. That and keep the speaker plugged. If she beeps without a card, she may still be alive.

Anyway, ill keep my statement. I dont think it was the unplugged fan that did it. I honestly think its a DOA. Hell, it happens. I work in IT, and trust me, it happens. Not so radical as your experience, but dead HW ...well..happens. Hey its in Warranty right ?

April 9, 2008 5:41:54 PM

Zorg said:
Don't mix and match old VGA/mobo and new VGA/mobo, you may fry the new part. Replace both and move on, a relatively cheap lesson in the scheme of life.



I see your point but what i'm worried about is i still don't know what exactly is wrong and what parts were damaged in the process. what if it's the PSU? how do i know my CPU/Memory didn't get fried too?

is there anyway for me to test these things out so i can get a grasp on what i need to do?

i'm so frustrated right now :fou: 
April 9, 2008 5:55:53 PM

1) Is it possible to kill that card that quickly? I only ran it without the fan for 20 minutes or so and it wasn't even all that hot to the touch when I first smelled the fire.

-YES!

2) If I did fry that card, is that whole PCI-E 16X slot fried too?

-Most likely!

3) If I can get another card and everything seemingly works fine, should I be concerned about anything? IOW, would the CPU/Memory/PS have been affected by this incident?

-Wouldn't recommend putting any card back into the slot that burned.

4) Is it possible for a motherboard to smoke like that and still is ok or should I seriously think about getting a new one?

-If the MOBO is still working with a different video card in a different slot, don't worry about it.

Here is what most likely happened. A part on the video card experienced thermal run awway and failed as a short. This cased the video card to smoke and also crowbarred the pins on the MOBO slot that supplied the power causing the MOBO pins to get hot and glow. You most likely irreparably damaged the PCI slot or weakened it severely. You risk frying another card if you plug it into that PCI slot. Never use that slot agian.
April 9, 2008 6:02:05 PM

kwanasek said:
1) Is it possible to kill that card that quickly? I only ran it without the fan for 20 minutes or so and it wasn't even all that hot to the touch when I first smelled the fire.

-YES!

2) If I did fry that card, is that whole PCI-E 16X slot fried too?

-Most likely!

3) If I can get another card and everything seemingly works fine, should I be concerned about anything? IOW, would the CPU/Memory/PS have been affected by this incident?

-Wouldn't recommend putting any card back into the slot that burned.

4) Is it possible for a motherboard to smoke like that and still is ok or should I seriously think about getting a new one?

-If the MOBO is still working with a different video card in a different slot, don't worry about it.

Here is what most likely happened. A part on the video card experienced thermal run awway and failed as a short. This cased the video card to smoke and also crowbarred the pins on the MOBO slot that supplied the power causing the MOBO pins to get hot and glow. You most likely irreparably damaged the PCI slot or weakened it severely. You risk frying another card if you plug it into that PCI slot. Never use that slot agian.



thanks so much for your response...what you describe also seems like a likely cause.

So in your opinion, if I RMAd the board, got a new video card, and used all the other parts that I already had in there I should be OK? in other words, you don't think the other components like CPU, memory, PSU were affected by this? This is what I'm leaning towards doing at this point.
April 9, 2008 6:34:33 PM

The PSU, CPU and RAM are probably OK. The CPU and RAM, if they are bad, will most likely not damage the mobo.
April 9, 2008 7:08:13 PM

If I were you I would rma the board, and the card, which ever isnt burnt send to newegg, and get a new one. Whatever is burnt send to the manufacturer, and theyll send ya a new one. I would get this done in a hurry since the longer your down, the longer you have to wait to get back up and runnin. If you like to play chances keep the mobo. Personally I wouldnt trust it one bit, and get it rma'd to be on the safe side. I like to know that my investment of time, money, and research is runnin at its best, and will be dependable. I wouldnt waste anytime seeing if its going to be "ok" just send it in and have the peace of mind that in a year, your computer wont randomly crash, and now you have to fork out more money, time, and research to replace it, but hey thats just me, im a little impatient and rma's arent the fastest.
April 9, 2008 7:27:35 PM

I echo everyone else's opinion on this. RMA the board and card. At least one of them is toast for sure, and the other one probably isn't much better. Your other components are probably fine.

As for what happened, I don't think it was the card. In my experience, video card overheating results in crashing your system long before the card damages itself.
April 9, 2008 7:47:40 PM

Yes do what blacksci said. I wouldn't risk it. Send card to egg and board to mfg call it a day.
April 9, 2008 8:04:31 PM

I'm aqlmost sure your PSU, CPU, and RAM are OK
RMA the board and graphic card
Smoke and glow !!!
And you are still waiting !!!
Hurry up and do not waste more time
April 9, 2008 8:55:05 PM

thanks guys...that's what i'm gonna do.

do you think it's worth trying to RMA the board through newegg even though there are char marks on it?

play dumb?
April 9, 2008 9:00:42 PM

I umm...know a guy...who's RMA'd stuff at newegg in pretty questionable condition. They've never given him any trouble.

You're probably better off avoiding any potential complications though, and just sending it back to the mfg.
April 9, 2008 9:05:29 PM

I would send it back to the manufacturer. The market is slow, and newegg while still excelling in customer service, is definetly on the decline, and may give you a bit of grief, send it back to you, and then you have a 2 week wait down the drain.
April 9, 2008 10:45:52 PM

well...i decided to call newegg and tell them the truth (more or less *wink*). She went ahead and gave me an RMA even though i told her about the smoke etc so we'll see what happens.

That's pretty awesome that they pay for shipping back and forth.

thanks for the advice guys...I'm crossing my fingers!
April 9, 2008 11:08:21 PM

Yeah, Newegg is pretty nice. If you don't do something too outrageous they will normally give you the benefit of the doubt.
April 10, 2008 12:58:53 AM

Newegg rocks man. Now you know why everyone in the know goes there ;) 
April 10, 2008 1:23:04 AM

Sometimes boards just fry and burn on their own, who is to say you did it? Except us of course, he he

Seriously. They burn on their own for any number of reasons. Just RMA and let them figure it out - the more you rationalize about it the more suspicious it will sound
April 10, 2008 1:13:38 PM

RMAing a setup you toasted is unethical. Be a man and spend the money. Think of it as paying for a lesson learned.

It's unfortunate that so many in the forum buy into "screw the man" mentality for an obvious Operator Error. Manufactures and Vendors do not just eat the cost for sending out new boards. They pass it on to everyone else who buys equipment. Therefore we all pay extra for our parts to cover the dishonest ones who RMA boards they toasted due to their own mistakes or ignorance.

Lets not be communists.

And for anyone who flames me for this message I say GROW UP! What are you 12 years old?
a b B Homebuilt system
April 10, 2008 2:29:11 PM

I agree with Kwanasek's initial diagnosis, but not so entirely with the tone of the last post. I'm not sure that what the OP did should have heated up a mobo like that. Thermal runaway was common in the days of germanium transistors, but I don't think I've seen a case of it in over two dozen years in IT.
I'm a little surprised that a current draw sufficient to cause a glow and smoke didn't cause the PSU to shut off; I'm assuming you have the Antec PSU that comes in that case.
I think the OP is definitely responsible for the dead GPU, but I'm not so sure on the rest. After all, that kind of failure could occur for other reasons (e.g. a bent contact in the PCIE slot), and like I said, a PSU ought to shut down in a case like that.
Buy a new GPU, possibly a low-end "throwaway" just for testing. If it works, great. If the problem persists you're out some time but not any more money.
April 10, 2008 3:23:58 PM

let the component overheat and burn is the last thing you wanna do.dont do it again!
April 10, 2008 3:24:48 PM

You must have missed the part where he unplugged the GPU fan so that it would run quieter.

"I had just finished building my new computer and turned it on for the first time. i bought everything with quiet in mind yet it was fairly loud. upon further examination i realized it was the fan on the XFX GE8600GT so I went on NewEgg to try and determine if other people thought it was loud too. sure enough others did and one guy mentioned that he pulled the power on the fan and it was quiet (i'd hope so!). This lead me to believe that he was running it without the fan. so for at least the time being while i was measuring the noise, i was going to do the same until i exchanged this for a quieter card. "

I'm not against RMAing bad product, but when the product goes bad from abnormal use than how is that the Vendor or Manufactures problem?
April 10, 2008 3:47:59 PM

i didnt missed what he said about pulling the fan power out.but he should monitor the temp while he is doing it.but he didnt and it got overheat.thats what i said.if you didnt undersyand me i recommand you read again.

and kwanasek im suspecting you are from manufacture.because the vendor or manufactures should have protection mechanism to protect from overheat or should shout down the pc or prevent pc from booting up.

makes sense to you?
April 10, 2008 3:59:19 PM

I was referencing jtt283 post not yours iluvgillgill.

No I don't work in the PC industry.

Could the video card manufacture have designed the card better? Yes. However I buy into personal responsibility. If you want to play, sometimes you have to pay.
April 10, 2008 4:25:50 PM

and are you saying that the price the manufactures charge is fair and they are not greedy at what ever the price is set at?

and since manufacture are producing products thats for the mass market.and you or they cant expect people who buys them know alot of pc hardware apart from push them in the slots and use it.

so in this case they should freeze or shutdown the pc if the noob person unplug the fan when he doesnt know what he is doing!so is the qualiy and prefessionalism of the manufacture who produce it will take the responsibility!
April 10, 2008 4:37:30 PM

To the OP-> And you're in IT? Isn't it your job to be on top of the latest and greatest? While I understand the bulk of your work may not be on gaming machines, the computer itself is the basic component for all that you do. For being in IT, you certainly seem to be lacking in technical knowledge, or at the very least, common sense. Sheesh, your poor employer needs to see this post.
April 10, 2008 4:40:46 PM

Dude. You say you're not a n00b, but you go and unplug a fan on a component that is mounted on a board? Do you think the fan was put there for a reason?

You did it to yourself. Learn a lesson, and just buck up for it. Don't try screwing someone else to pay for your stupidity. That's just bad.

Next time, get someone who knows hardware to help you out.

I'd rather have a somewhat noisy card than a dead one.
a b B Homebuilt system
April 10, 2008 5:11:27 PM

I have to agree with the last several Posters - You hose it, you pay! If prodcuct is "Overpriced - Don't buy it, the vender will then lower the price, unfortunately as they a say "A fool is soon parted from his money" so this seldom works.

As to thermal runaway, this is not limited to germamium transistors as Si Transistors also exhibited this. any material that has a negative temp coefficient exhibit this such as a carbon resistor. Luckly newer subsystems have protective mechamisms to prevent this, such as your new CPU's. DON'T expect manuf to increase cost for every one to prevent "Dumb As_" mistakes. I even make them, But if I ruin it - I pay for it.

Jtt283 - I agree with your comments 99.9 %, and they are valid and dead on. However; the PSU rail probably si current limited to 18 Amps, 10 Amps thru a circuit designed for much lower current can make a "glow" plug. I sq R 10 x 10 x .1 ohms is still ten watts. Most metals are poistive temp coeff., so as current increases R increases, however even as I decreases the IR drop increases ( goes in the direction of what causes the change.)
April 10, 2008 5:45:42 PM

I know the most probable thing sounds like the vid card, but did you have a floppy drive installed? you said that the burn on the mobo was by the floppy connector so it's odd the marks be there. Also being in IT i'm sure you know the dangers of not plugging a floppy drive in the right way.
April 10, 2008 6:37:20 PM

I'm not one to support those that break equipment out of their own stupidity but I've got to say that I'm not convinced this was his fault. There was an obvious overcurrent event at the power supply interface of the mobo. I don't see how disconnecting the GPU fan causes all other electrical safety features to fail. In fact, fail to a point that it could have caused significant collateral damage to previously uninvolved items.

To have a computer burn your house down because you unplugged a cooling fan just doesn't seem to be a reasonable result and I don't think he's screwing the manufacturer or the distributor by asking for replacement. The relationship between the overcurrent situation, safety circuit failure, and subsequent fire can hardly be blamed on the inoperable GPU fan.
a b B Homebuilt system
April 10, 2008 7:40:18 PM

piratepast40 - If this was a dvd player connected to a tv via a co-ax or signal video cable I might agree. It is Not, the PSU, MB and GPU are a unit, the only difference is the GPU used a connector and is changable, the PSU is an intrical part even though it is external to the MB. And Yes a problem caused by the breakdown in the GPU could damage the MB. As long as the +12 Current didn't exceed the Rail limit you can not blame the PSU.

It is like putting a penny in place of a 15 Amp fuse and saying that the 50 amp main fuse should have prevented the house fire.
April 10, 2008 10:31:33 PM

pongrules said:
To the OP-> And you're in IT? Isn't it your job to be on top of the latest and greatest? While I understand the bulk of your work may not be on gaming machines, the computer itself is the basic component for all that you do. For being in IT, you certainly seem to be lacking in technical knowledge, or at the very least, common sense. Sheesh, your poor employer needs to see this post.



The majority of machines in the workplace do not have graphics cards with fans on them so yes, I don't know as much about them as the rest of you. But I'd be willing to bet I'm more experienced and knowledgable than most in creating and managing IT budgets, planning and implementing instrastructures, and building DR sites. It's the nature if IT...we all have our area of expertise. Mine fall in the A+, NET+, CCNA, CCSP, CCNP, CCVP, and VCP variety so don't question my knowledge or how well I do my job because I unplugged a fan for 15 minutes. I've built over 20 computers for myself and others over the years and I've never fried a single component.


That said, I'm still not convinced that the lack of a fan was even the cause. Immediately after I smelled the burning I put my finger on each of the components that could have overheated and while the video card was the hottest, it was still cool enough for me to keep my finger on the heatsink without it burning.

And to all the cries of this being unethical, I didn't lie to NewEgg...I told them what happened and they sent me an RMA. What's the problem? If I knew that I broke something, I would "man up" and pay for it but I honestly don't think what I did caused this.
April 10, 2008 10:44:26 PM

glupee said:
I know the most probable thing sounds like the vid card, but did you have a floppy drive installed? you said that the burn on the mobo was by the floppy connector so it's odd the marks be there. Also being in IT i'm sure you know the dangers of not plugging a floppy drive in the right way.



what's a floppy? ;) 

nope...
April 10, 2008 11:04:02 PM

sean1017 said:
The majority of machines in the workplace do not have graphics cards with fans on them so yes, I don't know as much about them as the rest of you. But I'd be willing to bet I'm more experienced and knowledgable than most in creating and managing IT budgets, planning and implementing instrastructures, and building DR sites. It's the nature if IT...we all have our area of expertise. Mine fall in the A+, NET+, CCNA, CCSP, CCNP, CCVP, and VCP variety so don't question my knowledge or how well I do my job because I unplugged a fan for 15 minutes. I've built over 20 computers for myself and others over the years and I've never fried a single component.


That said, I'm still not convinced that the lack of a fan was even the cause. Immediately after I smelled the burning I put my finger on each of the components that could have overheated and while the video card was the hottest, it was still cool enough for me to keep my finger on the heatsink without it burning.

And to all the cries of this being unethical, I didn't lie to NewEgg...I told them what happened and they sent me an RMA. What's the problem? If I knew that I broke something, I would "man up" and pay for it but I honestly don't think what I did caused this.


I agree sean, IT is a broad field. I have quite a few friends in the field who have a much wider knowledge of it than myself, though when it comes to do it yourself gaming PCs they come to me for help. Trying to stay on top of every aspect is impossible. Turning off a fan on a high per,. vid card, or any vid card, is ill advised but frankly I'd expect a system crash and shutdown before a total system meltdown - though I suppose a meltdown is a real possibility. What you did may or may not have caused the problem and we will likely never know. Just RMA and let them figure it out.
April 11, 2008 12:06:08 AM

oh dude that's not good you are fcked now, just listen to the godfathers
April 11, 2008 12:07:47 AM

RetiredChief said:
piratepast40 - If this was a dvd player connected to a tv via a co-ax or signal video cable I might agree. It is Not, the PSU, MB and GPU are a unit, the only difference is the GPU used a connector and is changable, the PSU is an intrical part even though it is external to the MB. And Yes a problem caused by the breakdown in the GPU could damage the MB. As long as the +12 Current didn't exceed the Rail limit you can not blame the PSU.

It is like putting a penny in place of a 15 Amp fuse and saying that the 50 amp main fuse should have prevented the house fire.


Sorry Chief, I'll have to (edit - respectfully) disagree with you. The fan is not a part of the power circuit. If we follow your logic, then instead of video problems as a result of GPU overheating, motherboards would burst into flames. It's also possible that the traces that burned were a part of the power circuitry to the GPU but even that is most likely irrelevant. I understand what you're saying about bypassing a circuit protection feature but the OP didn't do that. Since we don't know the purpose of the traces that burned or if any circuit protection features are/are not in place, I'm wondering if the GPU fan being disconnected was actually incidental to the event.

And that's from a MM1(SS) :lol: 
April 11, 2008 12:35:22 AM

The card would have shut down or started artifacting horribly before it burst into flames.
!