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Ignorant questions

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Anonymous
July 31, 2005 9:14:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Group,
I just purchased a SONY KD-34XBR960 16:9 HDTV. I set up an antenna and I
think I'm getting some HDTV broadcasts, but with all the differing formats
out there I'm not exactly sure wtf I'm seeing half the time. Only a couple
sporting events filled the screen in a pretty awesome way, in
"normal" mode setting. Some letterboxed movies are clipped on top AND sides
even though they say 16:9 on the
guide. Some 480i things look better than 720p.You'd think
1080i would look the best and fill the 16:9 screen natively
but doesn't. What exactly "fits" this tv in a "native" way, i.e.
what format fills the 16:9 screen AND gives the best picture
quality? I knew my DTV sat feed would look like a 27" set
natively, except for the letter box movies, some are clipped
top and bottom and some are clipped on the sides. I've looked around on some
forums but it's way over my head at the moment. Can anyone explain in a
simple getting started way what all these formats are "supposed" to look
like?
Thanks,Adysthemic

More about : ignorant questions

Anonymous
August 1, 2005 12:22:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Adysthemic" <asifidsay@imprivate.com> wrote in message
news:11eqq7dh0h2ove3@corp.supernews.com...
> Group,
> I just purchased a SONY KD-34XBR960 16:9 HDTV. I set up an antenna and I
> think I'm getting some HDTV broadcasts, but with all the differing formats
> out there I'm not exactly sure wtf I'm seeing half the time. Only a couple
> sporting events filled the screen in a pretty awesome way, in
> "normal" mode setting. Some letterboxed movies are clipped on top AND
> sides
> even though they say 16:9 on the
> guide. Some 480i things look better than 720p.You'd think
> 1080i would look the best and fill the 16:9 screen natively
> but doesn't. What exactly "fits" this tv in a "native" way, i.e.
> what format fills the 16:9 screen AND gives the best picture
> quality? I knew my DTV sat feed would look like a 27" set
> natively, except for the letter box movies, some are clipped
> top and bottom and some are clipped on the sides. I've looked around on
> some
> forums but it's way over my head at the moment. Can anyone explain in a
> simple getting started way what all these formats are "supposed" to look
> like?
> Thanks,Adysthemic

You need to learn to use your TV's widescreen zoom/wide/normal aspect ratio
control to compensate for non-HD/non-16:9 material

an HD 16:9 show will fill the screen in "Normal" mode
a letterboxed SD show will fill the screen in "Zoom" mode
an HD or SD 4:3 show will fill the screen in "Zoom or Wide" mode with
clipping or stretching
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 4:33:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

A "normal" HD program, such as a network prime-time show, will fill your
16:9 screen and look very, very sharp. An SD program such as you used to
watch on your old TV, will be 4:3 with bars R&L and not so sharp. Some HD
movies will have black above and below because of the shape of the picture.

mack
austin


"Adysthemic" <asifidsay@imprivate.com> wrote in message
news:11eqq7dh0h2ove3@corp.supernews.com...
> Group,
> I just purchased a SONY KD-34XBR960 16:9 HDTV. I set up an antenna and I
> think I'm getting some HDTV broadcasts, but with all the differing formats
> out there I'm not exactly sure wtf I'm seeing half the time. Only a couple
> sporting events filled the screen in a pretty awesome way, in
> "normal" mode setting. Some letterboxed movies are clipped on top AND
> sides
> even though they say 16:9 on the
> guide. Some 480i things look better than 720p.You'd think
> 1080i would look the best and fill the 16:9 screen natively
> but doesn't. What exactly "fits" this tv in a "native" way, i.e.
> what format fills the 16:9 screen AND gives the best picture
> quality? I knew my DTV sat feed would look like a 27" set
> natively, except for the letter box movies, some are clipped
> top and bottom and some are clipped on the sides. I've looked around on
> some
> forums but it's way over my head at the moment. Can anyone explain in a
> simple getting started way what all these formats are "supposed" to look
> like?
> Thanks,Adysthemic
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 10:46:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Curmudgeon" <curmudgeon@buzzoff.net> wrote in message news:z9gHe.32395

> 1. ALL hd broadcasts are 16:9 in format. period


While technically true, there is a lot of 4:3 material "letterboxed" into
16:9 HD transmissions.
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 6:14:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

X-No-archive: yes

"Randy Sweeney" <DockScience@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:0pGdnbw7XMrAO3PfRVn-ow@comcast.com...
>
> "Curmudgeon" <curmudgeon@buzzoff.net> wrote in message news:z9gHe.32395
>
>> 1. ALL hd broadcasts are 16:9 in format. period
>
>
> While technically true, there is a lot of 4:3 material "letterboxed" into
> 16:9 HD transmissions.
>
========================
Actually 4:3 material is "pillar-boxed".
It is the 2.35:1 that is letterboxed.
The point is that the "transmission" (read overall picture) is 16:9.
=========================
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 10:47:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Adysthemic" <asifidsay@imprivate.com> wrote in message
news:11eqq7dh0h2ove3@corp.supernews.com...
> Group,
> I just purchased a SONY KD-34XBR960 16:9 HDTV. I set up an antenna and I
> think I'm getting some HDTV broadcasts, but with all the differing formats
> out there I'm not exactly sure wtf I'm seeing half the time. Only a couple
> sporting events filled the screen in a pretty awesome way, in
> "normal" mode setting. Some letterboxed movies are clipped on top AND
sides
> even though they say 16:9 on the
> guide. Some 480i things look better than 720p.You'd think
> 1080i would look the best and fill the 16:9 screen natively
> but doesn't. What exactly "fits" this tv in a "native" way, i.e.
> what format fills the 16:9 screen AND gives the best picture
> quality? I knew my DTV sat feed would look like a 27" set
> natively, except for the letter box movies, some are clipped
> top and bottom and some are clipped on the sides. I've looked around on
some
> forums but it's way over my head at the moment. Can anyone explain in a
> simple getting started way what all these formats are "supposed" to look
> like?
> Thanks,Adysthemic
>
>

Got two movies on DVD today to see if I could even come close to guessing
what the heck I'm going to get when I wnat to watch something. Both movies
were "widescreen".
One fit the screen as it "should". The other, no matter what setting, would
not fit the screen. Is the term "letterbox" 16:9
or can it be anything? Is the term "widescreen" 16:9? How the hell do I know
when looking at the "numbers" on the box, whether it be the guide 1080i 480i
720p, or the DVD
package, what EXACTLY I'm going to see on the screen?
Are there no common standards? Or am I just too dumb to get this? I have a
few days off to read the forums,and I purchased this set because my old one
died XBR2-32, and I got a really good deal on it,1400usd.So far it looks
good but not that much better, in the stuff I've seen.,Adysthemic
Anonymous
August 3, 2005 1:59:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Tue, 2 Aug 2005 18:47:48 -0700, Adysthemic wrote:
>
> Got two movies on DVD today to see if I could even come close to guessing
> what the heck I'm going to get when I wnat to watch something. Both movies
> were "widescreen".

Region 1 DVDs are recorded in NTSC, 480i, 4:3 aspect ratio. What you see
depends on how it was recorded, how the DVD player is setup, and how you
adjust the aspect ration on your TV.

> One fit the screen as it "should". The other, no matter what setting, would
> not fit the screen. Is the term "letterbox" 16:9
> or can it be anything?

Letterbox is an example of how the video was recorded. It was popular with
VCRs and early DVDs.

Letterbox is a 4:3 aspect ratio image with black bars at the top and bottom
so a widescreen movie would look normal on a 4:3 screen. If you watch a
letterbox DVD on a 16:9 screen it will either look right, look horribly
stretched, or it will be a smaller "window" in the middle of the screen. If
you can, you would change the TV settings to a zoom mode that would hide
the bars as much as possible. Some TV's won't let you do this, say if you
are using Component Video. Your DVD player should be told you have a 16:9
screen regardless.

> Is the term "widescreen" 16:9?

Sort of. It usually means that it is anamorphic, meaning the wide image has
been squeezed horizontally, so that a wide screen TV, when it stretches
horizontally, looks correct. The original film may not have been 16:9, it
could have been even wider, so you will still see some bars at the top and
bottom. When you watch a "widescreen" DVD on a 4:3 screen it will look
squeezed unless you tell the DVD player you have a 4:3 screen, in which
case it will appear letterboxed.


> How the hell do I know
> when looking at the "numbers" on the box, whether it be the guide 1080i 480i
> 720p, or the DVD
> package, what EXACTLY I'm going to see on the screen?

DVD is recorded at 480i, and you can often view it at 480p with component
video. There are no other resolutions. Your TV may up convert.

Brad H
Anonymous
August 3, 2005 8:59:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Widescreen" can be 16:9 but often is not. Depends on the shape of the
picture, as it was shot for the movies. Often, "widescreen" movies are
wider than 16:9, hence the black at the top and the bottom. Shouldn't be a
big deal for you, though. So what? I suppose if you have a TV that tends
to "burn in", you would not want to have that there all the time, but since
you are just watching DVD movies (and only plasma and CRT have that
tendency, anyway, and it is much improved recently), probably nothing to
worry about.

mack
austin


"Adysthemic" <asifidsay@imprivate.com> wrote in message
news:11f08lnqraeiha3@corp.supernews.com...
>
> "Adysthemic" <asifidsay@imprivate.com> wrote in message
> news:11eqq7dh0h2ove3@corp.supernews.com...
>> Group,
>> I just purchased a SONY KD-34XBR960 16:9 HDTV. I set up an antenna and I
>> think I'm getting some HDTV broadcasts, but with all the differing
>> formats
>> out there I'm not exactly sure wtf I'm seeing half the time. Only a
>> couple
>> sporting events filled the screen in a pretty awesome way, in
>> "normal" mode setting. Some letterboxed movies are clipped on top AND
> sides
>> even though they say 16:9 on the
>> guide. Some 480i things look better than 720p.You'd think
>> 1080i would look the best and fill the 16:9 screen natively
>> but doesn't. What exactly "fits" this tv in a "native" way, i.e.
>> what format fills the 16:9 screen AND gives the best picture
>> quality? I knew my DTV sat feed would look like a 27" set
>> natively, except for the letter box movies, some are clipped
>> top and bottom and some are clipped on the sides. I've looked around on
> some
>> forums but it's way over my head at the moment. Can anyone explain in a
>> simple getting started way what all these formats are "supposed" to look
>> like?
>> Thanks,Adysthemic
>>
>>
>
> Got two movies on DVD today to see if I could even come close to guessing
> what the heck I'm going to get when I wnat to watch something. Both movies
> were "widescreen".
> One fit the screen as it "should". The other, no matter what setting,
> would
> not fit the screen. Is the term "letterbox" 16:9
> or can it be anything? Is the term "widescreen" 16:9? How the hell do I
> know
> when looking at the "numbers" on the box, whether it be the guide 1080i
> 480i
> 720p, or the DVD
> package, what EXACTLY I'm going to see on the screen?
> Are there no common standards? Or am I just too dumb to get this? I have a
> few days off to read the forums,and I purchased this set because my old
> one
> died XBR2-32, and I got a really good deal on it,1400usd.So far it looks
> good but not that much better, in the stuff I've seen.,Adysthemic
>
>
Anonymous
August 3, 2005 9:03:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Mack McKinnon" <MckinnonRemoveThis@tvadmanDeleteThisAsWell.com> wrote in
message news:9K6Ie.61811$gL1.46132@tornado.texas.rr.com...
> "Widescreen" can be 16:9 but often is not. Depends on the shape of the
> picture, as it was shot for the movies. Often, "widescreen" movies are
> wider than 16:9, hence the black at the top and the bottom. Shouldn't be
a
> big deal for you, though. So what? I suppose if you have a TV that tends
> to "burn in", you would not want to have that there all the time, but
since
> you are just watching DVD movies (and only plasma and CRT have that
> tendency, anyway, and it is much improved recently), probably nothing to
> worry about.
>
> mack
> austin
>
>
> "Adysthemic" <asifidsay@imprivate.com> wrote in message
> news:11f08lnqraeiha3@corp.supernews.com...
> >
> > "Adysthemic" <asifidsay@imprivate.com> wrote in message
> > news:11eqq7dh0h2ove3@corp.supernews.com...
> >> Group,
> >> I just purchased a SONY KD-34XBR960 16:9 HDTV. I set up an antenna and
I
> >> think I'm getting some HDTV broadcasts, but with all the differing
> >> formats
> >> out there I'm not exactly sure wtf I'm seeing half the time. Only a
> >> couple
> >> sporting events filled the screen in a pretty awesome way, in
> >> "normal" mode setting. Some letterboxed movies are clipped on top AND
> > sides
> >> even though they say 16:9 on the
> >> guide. Some 480i things look better than 720p.You'd think
> >> 1080i would look the best and fill the 16:9 screen natively
> >> but doesn't. What exactly "fits" this tv in a "native" way, i.e.
> >> what format fills the 16:9 screen AND gives the best picture
> >> quality? I knew my DTV sat feed would look like a 27" set
> >> natively, except for the letter box movies, some are clipped
> >> top and bottom and some are clipped on the sides. I've looked around on
> > some
> >> forums but it's way over my head at the moment. Can anyone explain in a
> >> simple getting started way what all these formats are "supposed" to
look
> >> like?
> >> Thanks,Adysthemic
> >>
> >>
> >
> > Got two movies on DVD today to see if I could even come close to
guessing
> > what the heck I'm going to get when I wnat to watch something. Both
movies
> > were "widescreen".
> > One fit the screen as it "should". The other, no matter what setting,
> > would
> > not fit the screen. Is the term "letterbox" 16:9
> > or can it be anything? Is the term "widescreen" 16:9? How the hell do I
> > know
> > when looking at the "numbers" on the box, whether it be the guide 1080i
> > 480i
> > 720p, or the DVD
> > package, what EXACTLY I'm going to see on the screen?
> > Are there no common standards? Or am I just too dumb to get this? I have
a
> > few days off to read the forums,and I purchased this set because my old
> > one
> > died XBR2-32, and I got a really good deal on it,1400usd.So far it looks
> > good but not that much better, in the stuff I've seen.,Adysthemic
> >
> >
>
>

Thanks everyone for your comments. This is all starting to make a bit of
sense.

Station 1 broadcasts in 1080i 16:9 according to the guide.
What I see most of the time is wider than 4:3 with grey bars on both sides.
Commercials go from 4:3 to a little bigger,like the programming. On this
station I watched a show listed as HD. It filled the screen "as it should"
natively.
Some shots or scenes were awesome,others better than normal, however I doubt
whether I would have gasped at the difference had I walked into the room at
that moment.
So far HDTV is certainly better but hasn't lived up to the hype for me so
far. But just like drinking wine, it takes a while to appreciate, then you
cannot go back to 2buck chuck;>).

Station 2 The guide always says 720p. The shows look good but are black 4:3.
No HD there at the times I can view.

Station 3 1080i 16:9 black bars 4:3.

The DVDs were both "widescreen" on the box. I stretched
one to "full" and it looked much like it did on my old TV.
In "normal" it had bars on top and bottom. The actual picture was quite
good. I ended up setting it at "full".

So I guess in all a station can broadcast in 1080i material
recorded in 4:3 so you are getting a "full screen" potential ( the grey
bars) but you only see the source material 4:3.

Some (most it seems) movies on DVD are recorded in many formats.Only one or
two "native" to this TV. So without altering the "native" format to fit,
will always be "letterboxed" in some way. It's strange all these formats
were not standardized .

In conclusion am I impressed with HDTV? Not as much as I expected. I thought
it would look like an old fashioned projected slide show,only in motion. I'm
sure I will come to
appreciate it, like my XBR2. I could hardly watch TV at friends houses after
a time. I can feel that happening now even though HD didn't knock me on my
butt the first time.

Thanks for all the input Y'all. I'm going to have time (I hope)
this week to hang at AVS and see what I can glean from
there,Adysthemic
Anonymous
August 3, 2005 11:10:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Wed, 3 Aug 2005 09:59:36 -0700 Brad Houser <bradDOThouser@intel.com> wrote:

| Letterbox is a 4:3 aspect ratio image with black bars at the top and bottom
| so a widescreen movie would look normal on a 4:3 screen. If you watch a
| letterbox DVD on a 16:9 screen it will either look right, look horribly
| stretched, or it will be a smaller "window" in the middle of the screen. If
| you can, you would change the TV settings to a zoom mode that would hide
| the bars as much as possible. Some TV's won't let you do this, say if you
| are using Component Video. Your DVD player should be told you have a 16:9
| screen regardless.

This is why it is best to leave content in the same format it was
produced in. Let the final display convert or "window" it as it
can, or as preferred by the user. If it is shot in 16:9, it should
be left in 16:9. If it is shot in 4:3, it should be left in 4:3.

Similar reasoning applies to number of lines and frame rate. Due
to bandwidth capacity or storage space, there may be cases where it
just cannot be done. But it should be done wherever possible. New
DVD technologies are making it possible for hours of HD.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Phil Howard KA9WGN | http://linuxhomepage.com/ http://ham.org/ |
| (first name) at ipal.net | http://phil.ipal.org/ http://ka9wgn.ham.org/ |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
August 3, 2005 11:10:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

phil-news-nospam@ipal.net wrote:
> On Wed, 3 Aug 2005 09:59:36 -0700 Brad Houser <bradDOThouser@intel.com> wrote:
>
> | Letterbox is a 4:3 aspect ratio image with black bars at the top and bottom
> | so a widescreen movie would look normal on a 4:3 screen. If you watch a
> | letterbox DVD on a 16:9 screen it will either look right, look horribly
> | stretched, or it will be a smaller "window" in the middle of the screen. If
> | you can, you would change the TV settings to a zoom mode that would hide
> | the bars as much as possible. Some TV's won't let you do this, say if you
> | are using Component Video. Your DVD player should be told you have a 16:9
> | screen regardless.
>
> This is why it is best to leave content in the same format it was
> produced in. Let the final display convert or "window" it as it
> can, or as preferred by the user. If it is shot in 16:9, it should
> be left in 16:9. If it is shot in 4:3, it should be left in 4:3.

Is there any applicable meaning in your response? Movies are shot in
many aspect ratios that are not 4:3 or 16:9, 1.66:1, 1.85:1, 2.35:1
2.40:1 and 2.55:1 are pretty common. 2.0:1 is somewhat less common. DVDs
are 4:3 P&S, 4:3 letterboxed or 16:9 enhanced. That's what happens in
the real world. Deal with it. What you think things should be is of no
help to anyone who is interested in what is happening with the things
they own.

> Similar reasoning applies to number of lines and frame rate. Due
> to bandwidth capacity or storage space, there may be cases where it
> just cannot be done. But it should be done wherever possible.

This is relevent, how?

> New
> DVD technologies are making it possible for hours of HD.
>

This is relevent, how?

--
Matthew

I'm a contractor. If you want an opinion, I'll sell you one.
Which one do you want?
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 4:30:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Adysthemic" <asifidsay@imprivate.com> wrote
> So far HDTV is certainly better but hasn't lived up to the hype for me so
> far.

Really? I can't help but think that, if that is your experience, there
might be something wrong with the transmission to your house, your setup,
your TV, something. Because HDTV ought to knock your socks off. It knocked
mine off when we first got our Sony KDF-60XS955, and they're still off. HD
is dramatically different from SD, especially when you are watching
something that really benefits from high resolution -- like a football game,
for example. If you are not really impressed, I think you should have
someone over who has an HDTV and knows something about it to check out your
system and more sure everything is OK.

mack
austin
August 4, 2005 4:30:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 00:30:56 GMT, "Mack McKinnon"
<MckinnonRemoveThis@tvadmanDeleteThisAsWell.com> wrote:

>
>"Adysthemic" <asifidsay@imprivate.com> wrote
>> So far HDTV is certainly better but hasn't lived up to the hype for me so
>> far.
>
>Really? I can't help but think that, if that is your experience, there
>might be something wrong with the transmission to your house, your setup,
>your TV, something. Because HDTV ought to knock your socks off. It knocked
>mine off when we first got our Sony KDF-60XS955, and they're still off. HD
>is dramatically different from SD, especially when you are watching
>something that really benefits from high resolution -- like a football game,
>for example. If you are not really impressed, I think you should have
>someone over who has an HDTV and knows something about it to check out your
>system and more sure everything is OK.
>
>mack
>austin
>

Occasionally while during a football game the signal will briefly drop
from HD down to SD and then it REALLY hits you how terrific the HD
picture is.
Thumper
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 9:56:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Wed, 3 Aug 2005 09:59:36 -0700, Brad Houser
<bradDOThouser@intel.com> wrote:

>Region 1 DVDs are recorded in NTSC, 480i, 4:3 aspect ratio.

Close. They're actually NTSC, 480i, 3:2 aspect ratio. AR flags can be
set for either 4:3 or 16:9, but the actual "shape" of the image is
720x480, which is 1.5:1.
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 11:12:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

X-No-archive: yes

"Adysthemic" <asifidsay@imprivate.com> wrote in message
news:11f2nmod6n0p910@corp.supernews.com...

> So far HDTV is certainly better but hasn't lived up to the hype for me so
> far. But just like drinking wine, it takes a while to appreciate, then you
> cannot go back to 2buck chuck;>).
>
======================================
That is strange!
If you have everything set up properly, HD should knock your socks off!
It is VASTLY superior to SD TV and it is many times better than DVD.

The difference should be amazing!
===================================

> Some (most it seems) movies on DVD are recorded in many formats.Only one
> or
> two "native" to this TV. So without altering the "native" format to fit,
> will always be "letterboxed" in some way. It's strange all these formats
> were not standardized .
=========================
Why?
Variety of aspect ratio is a good thing!
=========================
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 5:23:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 05:56:25 GMT, Karyudo wrote:

> On Wed, 3 Aug 2005 09:59:36 -0700, Brad Houser
> <bradDOThouser@intel.com> wrote:
>
>>Region 1 DVDs are recorded in NTSC, 480i, 4:3 aspect ratio.
>
> Close. They're actually NTSC, 480i, 3:2 aspect ratio. AR flags can be
> set for either 4:3 or 16:9, but the actual "shape" of the image is
> 720x480, which is 1.5:1.

Thanks for the clarification of how things are done internally.

What I was referring to was the fact that there the DVD player is basically
NTSC: no special line rate, no special aspect ratio. There are 15,750 scan
lines per second, or 525 lines for each frame (480 of which are actual
content), 30 times a second. The frame has can be used for a 4:3 or 16:9,
but the number of scan lines (and the number of pixels per line) remains
the same.

Watching a widescreen movie on a 4:3 set is either going to reduce the
number of lines displayed, (where the player is creating a letterbox image)
or a "squished" image where everyone turns into bean poles when they turn
sideways. Of course, this depends on setting the DVD player to the correct
format of the TV/monitor.

Brad
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 6:59:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Thu, 4 Aug 2005 13:23:08 -0700, Brad Houser
<bradDOThouser@intel.com> wrote:

>On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 05:56:25 GMT, Karyudo wrote:
>
>> On Wed, 3 Aug 2005 09:59:36 -0700, Brad Houser
>> <bradDOThouser@intel.com> wrote:
>>
>>>Region 1 DVDs are recorded in NTSC, 480i, 4:3 aspect ratio.
>>
>> Close. They're actually NTSC, 480i, 3:2 aspect ratio. AR flags can be
>> set for either 4:3 or 16:9, but the actual "shape" of the image is
>> 720x480, which is 1.5:1.
>
>Thanks for the clarification of how things are done internally.
>
>What I was referring to was the fact that there the DVD player is basically
>NTSC: no special line rate, no special aspect ratio. There are 15,750 scan
>lines per second, or 525 lines for each frame (480 of which are actual
>content), 30 times a second. The frame has can be used for a 4:3 or 16:9,
>but the number of scan lines (and the number of pixels per line) remains
>the same.

True, but I'm trying to point out that R1 DVD is just as 16:9 as it is
4:3. The 'real' aspect ratio of the data is 1.5:1 -- pretty much
exactly splitting the difference between 4:3 and 16:9. Technically
speaking, 4:3 DVDs are just as anamorphic as 16:9 DVDs. The format was
designed for both. Still at the same old NTSC frequency and number of
lines per frame, but not only at the 4:3 aspect ratio like you kind of
implied.
!