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PC turns off after 2 Secs [URGENT]

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May 18, 2008 5:24:44 PM

Hey all,
I saw this question had been answered on this forum previously but it was a different circumstance.

Here is my problem.

My friend told me his USB slots werent working, and wanted me to take a look, So i did, his Dad said he wanted to see what processor it was to see if it wanted upgrading,while i had the lid off, so i took it out, then i put it back, and then this problem occured where the PC powers off after about 2 seconds.

Help?

More about : turns secs urgent

May 18, 2008 5:27:59 PM

Either you have a bent pin ( you didn't mention the socket type Edit: also it prolly wouldn't shut off in 2 sec's depending on the pin) ... or you didn't re-install the HSF correctly with thermal grease.
May 18, 2008 5:42:12 PM

If i had a bent pin then the CPU wouldn't place snuggly & correctly.
how do i reinstall the HSF & whats thermal greasE?
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May 18, 2008 5:54:13 PM

thermal grease, TIM, is the magic ingredient to make the cpu run longer tahn 2 secs
May 18, 2008 5:56:22 PM

what does it do though, explain please? :D 
May 18, 2008 6:05:49 PM

You are in deep poo poo. You could have used software, like CPU-Z 1.45 to determine the CPU. Hint, dont' work on other peoples stuff if you don't know what you are doing.

Thermal grease - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

My guess is that you didn't mount the processor heatsink properly. Two seconds is a really short time even with no grease, unless the mating surfaces are really bad.
May 18, 2008 6:31:36 PM

Odds are the old one had a thermal pad and after you seperated it you cant reuse it.

After you seperate the HS from the cpu there should be some residue, the stuff you probably had to clean off to see the cpu numbers. This has to be on to transfer the heat to the HS properly.

My Computer properties or CPU-Z will tell you what the cpu is lol.

"DONT" work on othr peoples PCs when you have no idea what you are doing. You could loose a friend or loose a wad of cash out of your pocket when you have to pay for repairs.


You will definately need new thermal paste to get it going again, and if you apply to much or to little it might overheat and ruin the cpu.

You just made one big head ache for yourself.

After you get it runnin you need to research a safe temp for that cpu and monitor the temps under a load for a whille.
May 18, 2008 6:33:44 PM

i do know what im doing though lol, I built my own PC and everything is fine with that.

The heatsync is fitted correctly as it has "lock levers" which were tightly in place while locked so that was in the right place.

I am guessing its over heating causing it to power off. But i dont get why its overheating if the heatsync is in correctly hmm.

Edit: There was no residue or anything when i lifted off the CPU.
May 18, 2008 6:38:06 PM

The new PC you built came with thermal grease preapplied. This one need new grease. You cant reuse once you seperate.

Its easier to build a pc then to fix one.
May 18, 2008 6:41:11 PM

There had to be a pad on the cpu or some grease. One way or the other. Alot of older systems use a white pad, that would mostlikely be hard and crusty now.

You broke the microscopic barrier, now it needs replaced.
May 18, 2008 6:42:46 PM

So you can't even tell us what CPU it is?

Does it have an IHS, or do you just see the die? If you don't have an IHS, you could have serious problems on your hands.

You can still have the HSF installed incorrectly that it will overheat quickly. Once you take off the HSF, it looses its seal, which makes all the air gaps open to where there is no contact between the top of the CPU and HS. So it will run hotter very quickly.
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May 18, 2008 6:50:23 PM

and the really old ones dont even have any temp protection, so chances are it has already released the magic blue smoke...
May 18, 2008 6:52:22 PM

I think it had a white pad yes, i cant really remember now. But i remember seeing a white pad on the top of the CPU.

Define IHS?
May 18, 2008 6:53:48 PM

snow naval said:
If i had a bent pin then the CPU wouldn't place snuggly & correctly.


Over looked this post.. :oops: 

That is why I said you didn't mention the socket type.

I've read other post on 775 sockets to where the pins are on the MB. The pin array had a few bent pins and the guy was having his PC shut of in 2 to 4 sec intervals, which was awhile back.
May 18, 2008 7:05:27 PM

Define IHS though :p 

Im not really a hardware person, but im a just a computer geek @ software.
www.snownaval.org. ;) 

So im not sure what socket type it was.
it had cut off edges. so the shape was like,

/ -----------\
. .
. .
. .
\ . . . . . . . /

and the pins were thin & pointy?
May 18, 2008 7:15:46 PM

:lol: . o O (computer geek, eh?)

IHS - Intergrated Heat Spreader:



Older ones without:

May 18, 2008 7:24:29 PM

yeah looks like top 1.
May 18, 2008 7:25:02 PM

Ok, here's what you should do, assuming this discussion isn't headed the wrong direction with the talk about the HSF (assuming nothing else is causing this problem).

Race on over to Fry's Electronics or some local custom computer store in town. Buy some arctic silver V ... that's a particularly popular thermal grease. Any other thermal grease will work ... just don't get one that says it's permanent or the like, though if you do it's not the end of the world (assuming you apply it and install the CPU right the next time - some thermal compounds will solidify and seal like glue would, making it impossible to remove the cpu).

Now, make a workspace for you to fix the computer. It should be off the carpet, preferably, but most importantly it should be near a desktop computer or a microwave (with solid metal casing) or a toaster (again, solid metal casing AND make sure the toaster has a three prong plug, not a two prong). Why? You want to ground yourself - a static discharge will make your life even more miserable. The third prong on a plug for any device just connects to a wire that runs to a pole that runs into the ground (or some equiv). Any static electricity will take that path rather than some path through your cpu. Just make sure you have some metal device with a three prong cable next to where you are working. Touch it before you touch any computer components and don't shuffle your feet (static build up). Also, make sure that whatever three-prong cabled, metal-cased electronic device you are going to use to discharge static is *plugged in*.

Open up the computer and remove the heat sink. The bottom may have some gunk on it ... take a q tip and splash the tip with rubbing alcohol. Use this to clean the bottom of the heat sink, where it contacts the cpu, thoroughly. Make sure there is NOTHING on the heat sink when you are done, inluding lint. Set aside and let dry.

Next, (touch something to "ground" yourself .. toaster or desktop computer) remove the CPU. Carefully inspect the pins. If one is bent, you can gently fix it using anything that will work, BUT:
do not overbend the pin. If it's leaning left, push it right but if you overshoot the mark and now it's bending right, you may find that it eventually breaks off. Bend it too much and it will definitely break.
do not rub the device you are using to bend the pin against a pin. For instance, it is ok (but not preferable) to use metal tweezers, just don't let the metal of the tweezers slide against a pin as you are trying to grasp it. This is being a little paranoid, but just be careful, as carelessness got you into this to begin with.

After the pins are fixed or if they were never broken, use a new q-tip and rubbing alcohol to clean the top (NOT the bottom, with the pins, of course) of the cpu, just like you did with the heatsink. It's important that while you do this you frequently, if not constantly, are touching the metal casing of some three-pronged (and plugged in) electronic device).

When you are done, gently install the cpu back into the slot. Make sure you check the pin configuration on the chip first, so you put it into the slot in the correct orientation the first time. Don't just plug it in and see if it fits, then rotate it if it doesn't.

Apply the thermal compound to the CPU. To do this the right way, search google for a guide for your particular thermal compound (ie arctic silver V) and/or read the manual. It's very easy, you just don't want to overdo it - a pea sized drop is usually enough.

Install the heat sink to the cpu, close up everything, and test it.

You asked what a IHS is. That is an integrated heat sink. It is a small metal layer on the chip itself (it cannot be easily removed, don't try) that covers the actual brain itself (basically). Some CPUs dont have this, some do, but it's nothing to worry about. If your cpu didn't have one, though, as another poster pointed out, you may be in more trouble, as your cpu is most likely shot.

Don't feel too bad about this. Most computer hardware experts learn through trial and error, and while some make more mistakes than others, everyone makes a mistake or two sometime.
May 18, 2008 7:30:17 PM

Thanks alot pal, youre a great help!!
May 18, 2008 7:44:34 PM

Yea, sounds like you need new thermal grease. Rest easy, with an IHS its a simple enough job.

I ended up ruining an Athlon 2800+ before AMD added there IHS replacing the heat sink. That was a bad deal, had to downgrade myself to an old PII 233. Worst 6 months of college easy, lol.
May 18, 2008 7:44:48 PM

If you are not getting past 2 seconds then I doubt it is a heat problem. The chip should be able to run way longer than that without any heatsink or fan (excluding overclocking). I would guess that you did not put the chip back right.

Do you hear any beeps when you turn the computer on. The beeps tell you if your computer posts correctly. If there is no beep at all then you almost definately messed up when you put it back together.

Check this site for post beep message codes
http://www.computerhope.com/beep.htm
May 18, 2008 9:42:21 PM

No Beep so the computer does not even complete the post at startup. I would just dismantle it all again, check all the parts then put it back together and try. If still no post you might have some serious damage done.

All power cables are connected to the motherboard right? Just asking cause I've made numerous simple errors building pc's.
May 19, 2008 6:11:48 AM

it doesnt have to time to post. As sometimes when you power it on it can shut off more or less straight away.

Im going back tonight, if all fails, my friend who works in a PC shop is takin' over lol.

First, ima take out the RAM. If that has no difference.
Check the CPU pins, if all is right, see if its on the right way.
If it is, apply thermal grease. If that doesnt work,
Buy a gun, & commit suicide. =]
May 19, 2008 11:42:06 AM

Kari said:
and the really old ones dont even have any temp protection, so chances are it has already released the magic blue smoke...



blue smoke? When i fryed a old chip do to a dead HSF I never saw any smoke!
May 19, 2008 11:47:58 AM

snow naval said:
If i had a bent pin then the CPU wouldn't place snuggly & correctly.
how do i reinstall the HSF & whats thermal greasE?



This post is wrong, one time i put a cpu (Penitum 4) in upside down and the HSF lock perfectly (only 4pins got bent) but the pins got bent completely side wise, I think i use too much force lol but the HSF did lock down. Once i fix the pins and put it in the right way the HSF lock down the same way it did last time and now works fine.
May 19, 2008 12:03:12 PM

So you had the same problem as me?
May 19, 2008 12:09:02 PM

snow naval said:
So you had the same problem as me?
no my computer just booted up to a blank screen but stayed on and made beeping codes.
May 19, 2008 12:28:35 PM

Ah Right, Im going to see if i can dig up my Old CPU and test that too.
May 19, 2008 4:59:12 PM

Mod can close this topic,
Fixed it :]

Working Correctly Now.
Cept one of the younger kids bent the pins in the mouse. So they need to dig out their spare mouse. But hey, not my problem :p  hahha.

Thanks guys for all your help!
May 19, 2008 5:25:01 PM

List of stupid things I've done to hardware:

# 1 (most expensive) Told a friend (very rich friend) I was building a PC for that putting a PC together is as easy as playing with LEGO. He received his components early and decided not to wait for me to assebple the PC and do it himself. He ended up forcing a Pentium 4 EE into the socket missaligned. Broke some pins while doing it. Then he drilled a hole through the processor to use it as a key chain and bought a new one.......(VERY VERY RICH FRIEND)

# 2 Cracked the heatsink on my x1650 when installing a Zalman fan. I didn't realize how hard I was squezing until it was too late. Note to self: always tools with a tension gauge on them.....

# 3 Dunno what I did wrong here but after changing the TIM on my cpu (I like to take everything apart every 6 months or so) my rig wouldn't load windows or hang during memory check. I turned it off and when I took the heatsink off the processor came off with it (socket 478 and the lock lever was down). Processor worked just fine afterwards....

# 4 I put all my components on the same +12V rail and ended up blowing the PSU. (Edit: back then I didn't know much about PSU's and thought that any generic PSU would do as long as it has the wattage rating. Now I know better.....)

.............................................


#????5 Just last week I installed some memory on the server here in the wrong DIMM. Easily fixed but still a VERY EASILY AVOIDABLE mistake.

The point is everybody makes mistakes and that's how you learn. Just make sure you get your friends (and customers) to sign a disclaimer stating that they don't hold you accountable for any damage done to their components before you mess with anything.
May 19, 2008 5:29:33 PM

navvara said:

Then he drilled a hole through the processor to use it as a key chain and bought a new one.......


Lmaooo! :lol:  :bounce: 

Worst thing ive done, and most expensive, is i shortcircuited my motherboard about a year ago, took my pc to fix something, and as i was puttin it back together i forgot one of the power cables :p 
Turned it on and it went BOOM, swear i nearly peed my pants hahaa./
May 19, 2008 6:07:26 PM

What did you do to fix it? Thermal Paste?
May 19, 2008 9:08:14 PM

Yes, and there was a bent pin on the CPU
May 19, 2008 9:56:39 PM

snow naval said:
Yes, and there was a bent pin on the CPU


OOOH MY GOD

I do wonder sometimes........

Then I pick my jaw up from the ground, swallow... Then walk away like nothing happend...

How on earth did you not see a bent pin, i mean the thermal paste would not really be the answer, more the pin issue..

Seriously dude, if that was my pc i would be punching you by now....

Leave hardware alone, I mean your track records bad dude...
May 20, 2008 2:22:04 AM

navvara said:
List of stupid things I've done to hardware:

# 1 (most expensive) Told a friend (very rich friend) I was building a PC for that putting a PC together is as easy as playing with LEGO. He received his components early and decided not to wait for me to assebple the PC and do it himself. He ended up forcing a Pentium 4 EE into the socket missaligned. Broke some pins while doing it. Then he drilled a hole through the processor to use it as a key chain and bought a new one.......(VERY VERY RICH FRIEND)

# 2 Cracked the heatsink on my x1650 when installing a Zalman fan. I didn't realize how hard I was squezing until it was too late. Note to self: always tools with a tension gauge on them.....

# 3 Dunno what I did wrong here but after changing the TIM on my cpu (I like to take everything apart every 6 months or so) my rig wouldn't load windows or hang during memory check. I turned it off and when I took the heatsink off the processor came off with it (socket 478 and the lock lever was down). Processor worked just fine afterwards....

# 4 I put all my components on the same +12V rail and ended up blowing the PSU. (Edit: back then I didn't know much about PSU's and thought that any generic PSU would do as long as it has the wattage rating. Now I know better.....)

.............................................


#????5 Just last week I installed some memory on the server here in the wrong DIMM. Easily fixed but still a VERY EASILY AVOIDABLE mistake.

The point is everybody makes mistakes and that's how you learn. Just make sure you get your friends (and customers) to sign a disclaimer stating that they don't hold you accountable for any damage done to their components before you mess with anything.


#1. Put thermal tape instead of termal paste for the HSF!!!! (anyone ordered a p4 well done extra crispy?). $150 chip :/  at the time.

#2. put in a CPU in upside down and bent 4 pins when locking down the HSF. I bent the pins back in place and the cpu worked fine :p  thx god.
May 20, 2008 1:06:49 PM

Harry Plopper, i was in a rush so mistakes are doable. As for the "track record" it's none existant mate, sorry for not being so perfect like yourself...
May 20, 2008 7:00:23 PM

snow naval said:
Yes, and there was a bent pin on the CPU

Glad you got it resolved. But this quote was the first clue you had a bent pin...

Quote:
If i had a bent pin then the CPU wouldn't place snuggly & correctly.


The CPU should drop right in. It shouldn't be snug at all until you lock it in place.
!