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My Chasis Fans Are Too Loud! HELP!

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May 26, 2008 7:35:13 AM

hi everyone,

im using three 80mm fans.
my room temprature is around 20C-25C, expected to go up to 30 degrees C at highest.
i cannot get bigger fans for my computer due to case design, but i saw these "silent" fans that were 80mm.
do those work?
any other cheap alternative pls!
this is my first homemade computer.
i dont know all that much... but i know my way around the case and mobo i guess.
any sugestions!?! please!!!

other types of silent cooling that are easy to install, and inexpensive would be nice to know =)
i dont plan to overclock anytime soon, but i just want silence.
please help, i have a huge headache from the noise! soooo annoying

thanks!

More about : chasis fans loud

May 26, 2008 7:36:20 AM

woops, forgot to add, i got this 3.5" fan controller thing for my case for fun... how do i know if i put them too low? lol i dont wanna burn my computer. what are the warning signs and stuff? thanks!
May 26, 2008 8:14:14 AM

I have four 80mm case fans, and they are the low noise, silent type fans, and it does make some difference, and I also have a fan controller has a button for each fan, but even with that the CPU fan can give off some noise, and it has a after market heat sink with a 120mm fan, with it's own fan controller to, but I found that the loudest component of my PC is the video card, a ATI 2900XT, and not much I could do with that other than a after market cooler maybe, I use Asus probe to check temperature and another program,, I think Everst, and just by playing around with the different controllers, I found that there is a sweat spot between 1/2 to 3/4 that's the most effective.
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May 26, 2008 9:10:56 AM

Hi Xaelee.

I've just been through this with my case. Have you made certian that it is the case fans that are loud, not the CPU, power supply or GPU?

Generally you trade off the quantity of air moved with the amount of noise the fan makes. A good guide is not the manufactures volume rating (expressed in decibels, dB) but the rpm of the fan. Lower rpm fans generally create less noise.

Make sure you also have a good look around at prices I saw fans at £9 in one place and the £2.50 in another. As per normal you pay for quality parts.

This was my discussion on the case fan issues with some really helpful posts, make sure you look at the silent PC review articles they are very useful if you wish to reduce the noise from your case. (Note that there is also discussion about power supplies at the same time!)
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/249858-28-replacement...

Hope this is helpful.

Jeremy
May 26, 2008 11:35:31 AM

Another thing that might contribute to the noise is the grill that the fan sits on.A lot of cases have a pretty basic pre-punched grill which blocks a lot of airflow and creates more moise. Bit of pain with having to remove everything from the case to do it, but armed with some time, some tin snips and a couple of fan guards. Would probably improve the airflow and let you run the fans at a lower speed.

I keep on meaning to do this to my main PC but the case metal is very thick and never get round to it. Anyone done this and noticed much of an improvement?

Karl
May 26, 2008 11:59:31 AM

womble said:
Another thing that might contribute to the noise is the grill that the fan sits on.A lot of cases have a pretty basic pre-punched grill which blocks a lot of airflow and creates more moise. Bit of pain with having to remove everything from the case to do it, but armed with some time, some tin snips and a couple of fan guards. Would probably improve the airflow and let you run the fans at a lower speed.

I keep on meaning to do this to my main PC but the case metal is very thick and never get round to it. Anyone done this and noticed much of an improvement?

Karl


Depending on the grill design, removing them can make an enormous difference. I have done this with various different cases, and the increase in airflow, decrease in noise can be significant. This applies to both intake and exhaust fans. A hole saw can be used to remove the grill, even better is a purpose designed hydraulic punch, however this is an investment that can't be justified unless written off as a business expense. Other options include use of a nibbler or a "dremel" tool.

A good fan option, if you can find them, is the Scythe Slipstream 80mm fan, very quiet and good airflow.
May 27, 2008 2:35:38 AM

nice nice, i like the volume and quality of replies, thank you all.

i was also wondering how i know where to draw the line between good airflow and silent fans. thanks!
May 27, 2008 3:27:04 AM

as for the questions whether if im sure if its the fans or not... to be honest im not 100% sure...
its a high humming sound as if the fans were going at a fast speed. do you guys think it could be somethign else? if so, what could those be and how can i fix it?!?
a b ) Power supply
May 27, 2008 6:55:38 AM

To determine if it is the case fans or not disconnect all your 80mm fans and boot your PC. At this point there should only be 3 or 4 fans spinning:

1. CPU fan
2. GPU fan
3. Power supply fan
4. Chipset fan (if there is one)

If you do not hear any annoying fans, then yes your 80mm fans are the problem. It could be any combination of your 80mm fans if they are of different make and model.

I would recommend Noctua 80mm fans which will probably cost anywhere from £9 - £11.
May 27, 2008 12:19:21 PM

If it is the 80mm fans that contribute most of the noise then there are plenty of options for replacement. Noctua are good but soo expensive. I found Nexus 80mm (also very good) for less than £3 from novatec. Shopping around really helped. Are you buying in the UK?

See the post I left earlier for some good advice on fan choice. Generally rpm is the thing to look for. There is also good guidance on what will last well.

As for airflow. Quieter fans move less air, it's a trade off, but overall you aren't going see a massive difference in temperatures by changing the flow. You will hear the difference though. As this thread is about case fans being noisy then I assume noise not flow is the priority.
May 27, 2008 10:54:27 PM

you guys are great thanks!
let me try a few tests over the next few days... (im busy)
and adjustments, and ill get back to this post.
if there are other suggestions, please do share! thanks so much.
May 30, 2008 1:17:23 AM

kk, so guys...
i think its my cpu fan. its quite dusty too.
im asuming if i clean it, it will temporarly lower the fan speed on its own, but i guess im gona get a 60 dollar cpu fan or something...
May 30, 2008 1:19:18 AM

oops, forgot to add... ANY SUGGESTIONS?!?! :D 
May 31, 2008 6:06:42 PM

$60 for a CPU fan is too much. If it is the stock fan that came with the processor try something like an Artic cooler freezer 7 pro ($25 newegg) again look for fan speed rather than the stated dB rating it will probably be a better indication of noise produced.
Also try silent pc review and see if they have anything.

Assuming you currently run a stock cooler you should find something quieter for less than $60 dollars.

Jeremy
June 1, 2008 5:46:07 AM

ah, thanks. yeah ive started another post regarding this. the aractic cooler freezer 7 came up a few times. ive been told its not known as a silent fan though.
June 1, 2008 10:37:29 AM

Ok,
Work on your other post as that will be more useful. Hope we have been of some help!

Jeremy
June 3, 2008 12:32:00 AM

definitely helped a lot. thank you very much!
March 15, 2009 3:26:59 PM

I'm about 6 months late to the draw, but this information may be helpful to others, so here it goes:

Most "silent" fans are just slower spinning versions of the high speed fans.
There's a simple and FREE way to slow them down so they'll make less noise.
Prerequisite: make sure that your case has unobstructed airflow/ good wire management to maximize airflow. The FREE mod I'm going to tell you about has the potential to overheat systems with bad airflow (poor ventilation, intake, etc)

What you'll need:
your fans
way to attach them to a standard 12volt molex PSU connection ( how they usually start out))
Small, flat head screwdriver- like in an eyeglass kit OR thick paper clip.

What you will do:
1.Unattach fans from the 4 pin molex connections they are connected to.
2. If you are using a 3 pin to pin adapter, you will be working with this. If your fans already have four pins, you'll be working with those.
3. the 4 pin molex power connector has 4 leads: 1 red, 1 yellow, 2 black. The blacks are ground (0 volts) the reds are 5 volts, and the yellows are 12 volts. You will be able to decide if you want your fan to have a low speed (5 volt) or a medium speed (7 volt trick). If you want the lowest speed: reverse the yellow and red leads. For medium speed, connect the black wire from the fan to where the red wire is.

Note: sometimes pin fan connectors use a red wire for their 12 volt line; this is especially true if there are only two pins connected; adjust instructions accordingly.

Use this technique to get the pins out:
Pinch the wire at the base of the molex connector with your left hand, making sure to gently pull at at it, while you use your screwdriver or paperclip to push at the little retention tabs sticking out of the pins at their bases (you will need to look inside the connector to see them). While doing the pinch pull thing with your left hand, make sure to warble that wire like a top. The pin will pop right out. It takes less than 15 seconds for the first time and about 2 seconds any time after that.
!