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Which memory for my OC situation?

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June 29, 2008 12:12:39 PM

I have spent a lot of time reading threads trying to figure this out before making a buy. If I had to choose one of the 2 memories that i will list, which would help me over clock better to reach my desired result?

The desired mobo is: GA-X48-DS4 (1600/1333MHz fsb)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The processor will be Q6600 G0 (1066 fsb).

There will be a good quailty cooling fan.

I hope to hit 3.0-3.4 ghz

Memory:
1) Patriot 1066 (5 5 5 15 2.1v)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

2) Patriot 800 (4 4 4 12 2.2v)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

You probably dont need to follow these links. Both these memories are similar in terms of being performance memory and both appear to have the same heat dissipator.

I have read a lot of comments about the 800 memory just being the same as the 1066 just not over clocked. I keep reading that it is best to just save ones money and go with the 800 because performance gains are marginal between the 2 types. The reason im asking the question is because i want to OC the 6600 and from what i gather depending on the mobo, 1066 or 800 can make a difference in how well the OCing of the processor goes? Am i correct in saying this? (If someone could explain how it makes a difference that would be great!) If you prefer one to the other, please let me know which one and more importantly why.

(I am not really interested in if patriot is good memory or not or anything like that. I am more or less trying to understand a concept about OCing and memory speed.)

I really will appreciate each response that i get! Thanks in advance!

- Hypnotico

More about : memory situation

June 29, 2008 12:25:05 PM

One thing you have to understand is that DDR2 1066 is DDR2 800. When you get it and install it into your system it will be recognized as DDR2 800. You might be able to get slightly better timings @ DDR2 800 using DDR2 1066 but in order to get that chip to the speeds you are looking for all you need is DDR2 800.

JEDEC is the governing body which chooses the speed rating for RAM and their speeds for DDR2 are 400, 533, 667 and 800 all at 1.8v. Some RAM is capable of higher voltages or higher speeds and companies give their own ratings to the chips and list them on the SPD (Serial Presence Detect) chip as EPP (Enhanced Performance Profiles). Most modern memory chips, especially high end chips, have multiple ratings recorded on the chip.

Just to give an example these are from my old RAM and my current RAM


The second one is sold as Mushkin DDR2 1066 and as you can see it is identified as DDR2 800. Two things to look for when buying RAM are the voltages and the latency. I have seen plenty of RAM sold as DDR2 800 5-5-5-15 2.1v and DDR2 800 5-5-5-15 1.8v. Remember that the standard for DDR2 is 1.8v so in that example the second set actually uses better chips because it is capable of those timings at a lower voltage. Something like this is a good choice, low timings, low voltage, low price.
June 30, 2008 12:15:35 PM

As ausch30 has said, the OCing of your cpu is not dependent on which memory you buy.

As you increase the fsb, you must later the frs/dram ratio so that the memory is clocked below it rated limits eg 800mhz. The bios of that baord makes this very easy as it tells you exactly what the rated speed and the actual speed of the memory will be for each ratio. I know, i have the board.

Once you have OCed you cpu (say to 3.0 ghz ) and the memory ration has been adjested so that its still at 800mhz. You can then try raising the fsb without altering the memory/fasb ratio so that your ram will be forced to run faster.

I have 4 gigs of the patriot ddr2 800mhz and now i have my q6600 at 3.0 i think im gonna try getting a little more out the ram. However the gains are never going to be that noticeable.
July 1, 2008 9:13:43 AM

Thanks for the responses. I will just go with the DDR2 800 for now. If any performance gains are marginal, then i would just rather save the money for a future build where the $ are better spent.

I dont know very much about overclocking and i only got a primitive understanding of it. Once i have the comp built, i will read into how to do overclocking more. Thanks for the insights! As you both can tell, im new at this stuff.

If you want to check out what im currently planning for my complete build, i created a post in the "New System Build" forum with a post entitled something like, "Final Thoughts Before Ordering". Feel free to scope it out! Im excited!

- Hypnotico
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