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My new build/first WC build

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February 11, 2009 3:49:54 PM

Here we go, this build will be an i7 on a rampage II mobo with 6 gigs OCZ platinum ddr3, 1000W corsair psu, GTX 295, HAF 932 case, blahblahblah. The thing I need advice on is the water cooling system I plan on custom building when I've never WCed anything before. I'm going to start with just WC'ing the CPU then add the gpu, ram and chipset later on. One step at a time for me.

links to parts I plan on using:

Pump
Can I mount this pump sideways or upside-down? Does it have to be mounted in a certain orientation?

Reserator - mounting this on top of the case, externally

CPU block
Should I be using an aluminum block since my Rad is alum?

Tubes

Among various other fitting, a filter, and therm for the reserator.


Any advice is welcome, I plan to cool all heated parts eventually (chips, RAM, GPU) Is this radiator/pump sufficient for such an application? My case (HAF 932) has a 230mm fan blowing out of the top which should supplement the passive cooling.

More about : build build

a b K Overclocking
February 11, 2009 9:25:54 PM

1. Cooling RAM, GPU, NB is totally pointless unless doing serious OCing.

2. If you haven already, read these:
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=20...
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=75...
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=54...

3. The DD TDX isn't good enough for a Quad Core (Actually it's not even good enough for a Dual). Get a Swiftech GTZ.

4. You need a good rad for a quad core. I recommend the Thermochill PA120.X or Black Ice Pro.

5. Switch pump to a D5.

6. Places to buy parts:
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=67...
My personal favorites are: Danger Den, Petras, Jab.

7. Leak testing:
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=54...
DO THE LEAK TESTING CORRECTLY

8. Don't forget to use PT Nuke or KillCoils.


====
Btw, +1 for the YateLoon and the Black Ice.
Related resources
a c 86 K Overclocking
February 12, 2009 2:46:19 AM

Shadow is 100% with his info. One of my fav sites.

Take it slow, please, it's not hard but needs careful planning.

And most importantly, the reserator is considered junk in the real WC world and for sure will NOT be able to dissipate the heat you will generate no matter what you have read.
February 12, 2009 4:16:56 AM

I plan on leak testing properly. I have a psu tester and will buy the parts for the WC loop before anything else. Test it externally (easier with an AC pump... just a thought). I'm waiting for the engtx 295 to hit the US market so build will be a few weeks anyway. Thx for the advice, it is invaluable so far. So is www.xtremesystems.org, thank you!

That reserator is really junk??? I kinda like it just for looks... (red and black theme)
I really just want to cool the CPU and GPU with that and there will be airflow over it.
Not going to be sufficient? (i7 940, asus engtx 295)? It's 21" long... With a 230mm fan blowing air over it... I really just like the style of it and it was an integral part of my mod. If it's really junk I'll scrap it but I don't want to. I OC but my limit is heat so far. I'm a gamer so I just need current hardware to work a little faster for smoth play, only when new game is bumped out, every year or 3. So.... the thing is more for looks and a slight boost for a cpu/dual gpu loop in all reality.


I am taking it very slow. Liquids and comps. Sigh... I'm about to gut a mineral oil aquarium, seems easier.
a c 86 K Overclocking
February 12, 2009 6:00:48 AM

Yea, you have to understand. An i7 overclocked needs a quality rad sized at 120x2. The GPU itself will need a 120x2 rad if you overclock it and have 25-27C ambient room temps in the summer. You have to understand a rad can only pull xx watts out of a loop. And I'm meaning quality rads designed 100% for us.
Here is rad testing and the wattage each can do with specific fans etc.
Expect on an OC 17 to easily hit 200 watts, and your planned GPU to hit 250+ easy. Remember you want to keep the water cooler for best CPU temps, so overradding is a popular choice.

http://martin.skinneelabs.com/

The reserator can only pull so much heat from a loop, and please please don't believe the hype you read in advertising. I remember Thermaltake saying it can remove 1200 watts from a loop. Sure, if you don't mind your idle temps at 50C and load temps above that. They are a joke in the WC world for that, and the reserator isn't much better.

You'll have to learn about the delta water temps between load and ambient, what type or rads are good for quiet or just max (LOUD) heat dissipation, what fans you'll need depending on the rad you choose, a bit on flow rates, pump choice, CPU and GPU blocks (there are 5 leading GPU block makers).

Last thing: Spend your $$ on a reserator and toss it in a year as the pump dies and you realize the temps suck. Or go with what we know is good, but it takes some effort. If you have been overclocking and adding new HS to the PC and fans etc, it's easier than ya think. A person who has a Dell and calls the PC case a 'hard drive' need not bother.

It's really not that hard. You buy a 120x4 sixed rad, MCP 355 pump with an XSPC top, GTZ CPU block, Swiftech rev 2 resivior, 10ft of 1/2" ID 3/4" OD Tygon 3603 hose, 15 or so clamps, 4 good danger den fatboy barbs to replace the few cheapo plascit ones, a Danger Den block for the GPU, and your done. Then learn about prepping the loop. Ohh I wrote something about that, here it is!

.........................................................

Okay, here is the skinny on building a loop.

Once all the stuff is there, cut a 3" piece of tubing and learn how to put it on a barb and clamp it. Better now than when it's in the PC. Exercise the clamps, open, close them a few times to make them smoother.

Barbs, tighten down to finger tight and 1/4 to 1/2 turn more. Look at o-ring, do it a few times to get the hang of it before it's in the PC.

Rad prep:: One of the most missed things. Boil sink water, let cool 5 min. Pour into rad filling it up, let sit 10 min. Drain 1/2 water or so, shake till your arms hurt, 3-4 min like a crazy man. Drain into a clear container. Do the rad dance again and again till the water from the rad is clear and no gunk once the water settles. Then do it two more times. NOW and only now is your rad 90% clean. No worries, the last 10% will come out in the next year or two when you redo your loop for maintenance. Oh and post a vid of ya dancin, be a fun thing to see.

Inspection: Open pump, look for gunk, packing material. Run sink water Through the blocks, pump, hose. Drain as well as you can, but don't freakaziod on draining. Inspect bottom of block, don't forget to remove the plastic cover!! Seen it done by pros, funny......

Inspect screws and holes, check they go together well first. Seen more than one bad HS screw broke in a bracket. Your rad screws might not work perfect, and DON"T put a screw through the rad, seen it done more than once.

Wash hands very well to remove any finger oils, in time it will stain your copper blocks. I wipe with alcohol before handling the stuff. Keep alcohol away from acrylic, it will crack it in time.

Install blocks on parts. Take it slow, even remove to check TIM contact if you want. Install hose, measure twice, cut once, make a bit longer if your worried, you can always cut it shorter. Dry mount everything, and inspect all clamps etc. Take a walk, watch a movie. Then inspect it again.

Unplug PSU from everything except pump. Turn PSU and wall power off. Jumper the 24 pin PSU connector green and ANY black wire. Insure PSU is off. Connect pump to PSU.

Add liquid to res till full. Turn PSU on, it should run dry in a second or two, turn PSU off. It's called bumping the pump. DO NOT LET PUMP RUN DRY, ceramic bearings needs water to stay cool. Fill res, do it again, and again till water is in the loop. Watch closely, a big bubble can hit the pump and no water. Then bumping the pump, tapping hoses, turning case etc till your sure you got solid water flow. Keep an eye on it for 15 min or so, then check every 15 or so to make sure the res has water to almost full and pump is running. Pump might make a whooshing noise as bubbles get pulled through it, no worries. Put paper towels around EVERY fitting, laying below the CPU block, below the pump etc, check in an hour.

If you get water/liquid all over the place, the parts need to be taken out (meaning Mobo, GPU etc), rinsed in alcohol, lightly scrubbed with a toothbrush, compressed air AND if possible blow dried very very well on LOW heat, then left to dry for at least 24 hours. Pay close attention to the PCI slots if they get full of liquid. Compressed air helps a lot to blow them out.

By now it's late in the day, very late. Go to sleep with it running, check in the morning. Time to bump the pump, twist and turn, pinch a tube, tap rad SIDE with a screwdriver handle to break bubbles loose. Inspect the paper towels, turn it back on, run for an hour, inspect with a bright flashlight and bits of paper towels on every connection (barb and o-ring). No leaks? Turn er' off.

Connect Mobo and boot er up, go to bios immediately and check CPU temp. If good, boot up and check with your fav proggy, then load er' up and revel in the coolness of water and the quiet.

It could take a few days for the last of the bubbles to go away. Depending on your flow rate etc. Bumping the pump, tapping rad/hoses, pinching hose for a sec or two helps. Don't fret unless your temps are bad.


So it's not a ton to learn. Start reading I guess, become a member at these forums and here are some good purchase places too.

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/index.php? Not a noob site, but great stickies
http://www.ocforums.com/ My fav, good peeps, know their stuff, less hardcore
http://www.skinneelabs.com/MartinsLiquidLab/
http://www.over-clock.com/ivb/index.php?showtopic=20277 A GREAT Europe site
http://www.overclock.net/water-cooling/
http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fww... Info on rad testing
http://skinneelabs.com/

http://www.dangerden.com/index.php?option=com_frontpage...
http://www.petrastechshop.com/
http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/

Take your time, it took me 3 months to peruse the forums and learn as I read. I didn't buy my parts till then, and it was perfectly painless and successful.

February 12, 2009 1:43:32 PM

OK, that's a lot of great info. Would it be a good idea to use a regular radiator 120x4, and also the reserator I chose? Use the reserator as my resevior and put an aditional 120 x 4 rad in the loop? As I said the design of that reserator is a major part of my mod so I figure I can still use it if I put another rad in right?
a c 86 K Overclocking
February 12, 2009 2:35:43 PM

Go ahead, add another rad, get a 120x2 size and add it to the loop. Your flow rate might be getting on the low side, but it's your stuff.

Best of luck.
February 12, 2009 6:19:42 PM

So...
I'm getting the reserator I like just to use as a reservoir as to keep the same mod plan. I've done some reading and it sems like a good plan, getting a 120x3 rad for main cooling and an mcp355 pump, I'll decide on the block later. This HAF932 has plenty of room for more rads, I think I have three pre-drilled mounting locations for rads
a c 86 K Overclocking
February 13, 2009 2:42:13 AM

Is it the 3 fan reserator? Seen a MCR 320 put in one I think somewhere.

Look ahrd on OC and xtreme forums, thats where I woulda saw it. Looks good mounted on top of the case.
a c 330 K Overclocking
February 13, 2009 2:09:06 PM

Just make sure you have the right size fittings on all your stuff. I think that some of that zalman stuff uses metric fittings and a lot of WC stuff uses US standard measurements.
a c 86 K Overclocking
February 13, 2009 2:51:35 PM

LOL, that reserator will cool as much as 1/8 of the rad you plan to buy. It's aluminum too, and unless your very careful with the right liquid you WILL have corrosion problems on your copper and aluminum parts. Copper and aluminum don't mix well. And saying it's anodized means nothing. I can post pics where andodizing wears off and the the growth begins..... Just dump that silly res already.

rubix, actually we don't use US sizes for WC in the USA. ALL main manufacturerers use G1/4 barb threads (PA rads use G3/8), which is a British thread pattern. Not sure about the Zalman sizes, so few use it or post much about it.
February 13, 2009 3:44:06 PM

the aluminum thing will be a problem, gotta redesign now. Sigh, Just gonna go standard bay res and 120x3 rad I guess.

Rubix - what zalman stuff? Is xspc a zalman daughter company?
February 13, 2009 3:46:44 PM

As far as the rad goes... What's a good quiet choice for an i7 build? I plan on going with the 120x3 or maybe a 120x4... I have enough room! Pump will be mcp355.
a c 86 K Overclocking
February 13, 2009 4:11:10 PM

Become a member at OC forums and xtreme forums and read for a few days if not a few weeks. Here is a repeat of my earlier post.

Yea, you have to understand. An i7 overclocked needs a quality rad sized at 120x2. The GPU itself will need a 120x2 rad if you overclock it and have 25-27C ambient room temps in the summer. You have to understand a rad can only pull xx watts out of a loop. And I'm meaning quality rads designed 100% for us.
Here is rad testing and the wattage each can do with specific fans etc.
Expect on an OC 17 to easily hit 200 watts, and your planned GPU to hit 250+ easy. Remember you want to keep the water cooler for best CPU temps, so overradding is a popular choice.

http://martin.skinneelabs.com/

The reserator can only pull so much heat from a loop, and please please don't believe the hype you read in advertising. I remember Thermaltake saying it can remove 1200 watts from a loop. Sure, if you don't mind your idle temps at 50C and load temps above that. They are a joke in the WC world for that, and the reserator isn't much better.

You'll have to learn about the delta water temps between load and ambient, what type or rads are good for quiet or just max (LOUD) heat dissipation, what fans you'll need depending on the rad you choose, a bit on flow rates, pump choice, CPU and GPU blocks (there are 5 leading GPU block makers).

Last thing: Spend your $$ on a reserator and toss it in a year as the pump dies and you realize the temps suck. Or go with what we know is good, but it takes some effort. If you have been overclocking and adding new HS to the PC and fans etc, it's easier than ya think. A person who has a Dell and calls the PC case a 'hard drive' need not bother.

It's really not that hard. You buy a 120x4 sixed rad, MCP 355 pump with an XSPC top, GTZ CPU block, Swiftech rev 2 resivior, 10ft of 1/2" ID 3/4" OD Tygon 3603 hose, 15 or so clamps, 4 good danger den fatboy barbs to replace the few cheapo plascit ones, a Danger Den block for the GPU, and your done. Then learn about prepping the loop. Ohh I wrote something about that, here it is!

.........................................................

Okay, here is the skinny on building a loop.

Once all the stuff is there, cut a 3" piece of tubing and learn how to put it on a barb and clamp it. Better now than when it's in the PC. Exercise the clamps, open, close them a few times to make them smoother.

Barbs, tighten down to finger tight and 1/4 to 1/2 turn more. Look at o-ring, do it a few times to get the hang of it before it's in the PC.

Rad prep:: One of the most missed things. Boil sink water, let cool 5 min. Pour into rad filling it up, let sit 10 min. Drain 1/2 water or so, shake till your arms hurt, 3-4 min like a crazy man. Drain into a clear container. Do the rad dance again and again till the water from the rad is clear and no gunk once the water settles. Then do it two more times. NOW and only now is your rad 90% clean. No worries, the last 10% will come out in the next year or two when you redo your loop for maintenance. Oh and post a vid of ya dancin, be a fun thing to see.

Inspection: Open pump, look for gunk, packing material. Run sink water Through the blocks, pump, hose. Drain as well as you can, but don't freakaziod on draining. Inspect bottom of block, don't forget to remove the plastic cover!! Seen it done by pros, funny......

Inspect screws and holes, check they go together well first. Seen more than one bad HS screw broke in a bracket. Your rad screws might not work perfect, and DON"T put a screw through the rad, seen it done more than once.

Wash hands very well to remove any finger oils, in time it will stain your copper blocks. I wipe with alcohol before handling the stuff. Keep alcohol away from acrylic, it will crack it in time.

Install blocks on parts. Take it slow, even remove to check TIM contact if you want. Install hose, measure twice, cut once, make a bit longer if your worried, you can always cut it shorter. Dry mount everything, and inspect all clamps etc. Take a walk, watch a movie. Then inspect it again.

Unplug PSU from everything except pump. Turn PSU and wall power off. Jumper the 24 pin PSU connector green and ANY black wire. Insure PSU is off. Connect pump to PSU.

Add liquid to res till full. Turn PSU on, it should run dry in a second or two, turn PSU off. It's called bumping the pump. DO NOT LET PUMP RUN DRY, ceramic bearings needs water to stay cool. Fill res, do it again, and again till water is in the loop. Watch closely, a big bubble can hit the pump and no water. Then bumping the pump, tapping hoses, turning case etc till your sure you got solid water flow. Keep an eye on it for 15 min or so, then check every 15 or so to make sure the res has water to almost full and pump is running. Pump might make a whooshing noise as bubbles get pulled through it, no worries. Put paper towels around EVERY fitting, laying below the CPU block, below the pump etc, check in an hour.

If you get water/liquid all over the place, the parts need to be taken out (meaning Mobo, GPU etc), rinsed in alcohol, lightly scrubbed with a toothbrush, compressed air AND if possible blow dried very very well on LOW heat, then left to dry for at least 24 hours. Pay close attention to the PCI slots if they get full of liquid. Compressed air helps a lot to blow them out.

By now it's late in the day, very late. Go to sleep with it running, check in the morning. Time to bump the pump, twist and turn, pinch a tube, tap rad SIDE with a screwdriver handle to break bubbles loose. Inspect the paper towels, turn it back on, run for an hour, inspect with a bright flashlight and bits of paper towels on every connection (barb and o-ring). No leaks? Turn er' off.

Connect Mobo and boot er up, go to bios immediately and check CPU temp. If good, boot up and check with your fav proggy, then load er' up and revel in the coolness of water and the quiet.

It could take a few days for the last of the bubbles to go away. Depending on your flow rate etc. Bumping the pump, tapping rad/hoses, pinching hose for a sec or two helps. Don't fret unless your temps are bad.


So it's not a ton to learn. Start reading I guess, become a member at these forums and here are some good purchase places too.

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/index.php? Not a noob site, but great stickies
http://www.ocforums.com/ My fav, good peeps, know their stuff, less hardcore
http://www.skinneelabs.com/MartinsLiquidLab/
http://www.over-clock.com/ivb/index.php?showtopic=20277 A GREAT Europe site
http://www.overclock.net/water-cooling/
http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fww... Info on rad testing
http://skinneelabs.com/

http://www.dangerden.com/index.php?option=com_frontpage...
http://www.petrastechshop.com/
http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/

Take your time, it took me 3 months to peruse the forums and learn as I read. I didn't buy my parts till then, and it was perfectly painless and successful.

Become
a c 330 K Overclocking
February 13, 2009 5:45:29 PM

Your earlier post...'reserator, mounted on top'. Zalman makes the reserator, an all-in-one (crappy) WC system that people think is great...nope.

I think you meant RESERVOIR instead. That's what you actually have posted in that link...its a passively cooled reservoir with aluminum fins to dissipate heat.
February 14, 2009 3:33:29 AM

Well... anyway... Aluminum and copper are bad together. So the passively cooled reservoir is out of the loop anyway.
a c 330 K Overclocking
February 16, 2009 2:03:57 PM

I know that there have been arguments stating that it isn't an issue if you do it right, but either way, I wouldn't want to take the chance to find out and see, if I were you. Besides, the thermal capacity of copper vs. aluminum to remove heat is very much in the favor of copper...you would be better off with that for the sake of performance alone.
a c 86 K Overclocking
February 17, 2009 2:40:04 AM

deadone? The 420th, updates or you move to another forum?
!