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motherboard solid state capacitor quality??

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July 9, 2008 8:46:57 PM

Hello all:

i had my heart set on intel's x38 motherboard dx38bt because of my faith in the company's reputation of reliability and overall quality... but my perception changed...

recently, i was talking to a colleague about building my first system. he enlightened me about some facts that i did not know about the motherboard's hardware.
he pointed out that the dx38bt does not use ALL solid state capacitors, but some. apparently this was a drawback, so i went on to research....

to my understanding so far, the solid state capacitors are upgrades to the previous (non-solid-state???) capacitors; which improves the longevity, thermal properties, and storage capabilities vs the older ones

my question about solid state capacitors: is it really that much better? i mean, if it was, wouldn't it be more advertised by the manufacturers/distributors? does it make that much of a difference - or at all?

should i be looking for a mobo that has ALL solid state capacitors?

please enlighten me

these questions have led me to a GA-x38-d** mobo (still trying to see what the differences are between ds4 and dq6)
please comment on these mobos if you have any too


*notes:
some might argue that it does, while for some, its a matter of personal preference and how they're going to mod it
for example: the capacitors can be analogous to the blocks in car motors, in terms of material strength/quality/benefits...,
some cars come in cast iron block, while the same car, but in a different country where they put in different motors but in the same chassis (like 240sx in USA has iron block, while 240sx (called silvia in JAPAN) has aluminum block)... just looking at the block, the iron block has better compressive strength over the aluminum block, so the motor's capabilities are arguable.... some say it doesnt make a different as long as you mod it right.... again arguable
July 9, 2008 9:04:08 PM

the solid cap debate will go on for a long time... until they too start to dry out (and they do!).

ALL caps can/will fail if they are used outside of their design envelope.

the key to getting a good mobo is to get one with high quality caps, of either solid, or traditional aluminum design, or a mix. Keep the damn things cools, and dont operate them outside their design spec electrically (which should be pretty hard to do on a properly designed mobo).
July 9, 2008 9:35:22 PM

michiganteddybear said:
the solid cap debate will go on for a long time... until they too start to dry out (and they do!).

ALL caps can/will fail if they are used outside of their design envelope.

the key to getting a good mobo is to get one with high quality caps, of either solid, or traditional aluminum design, or a mix. Keep the damn things cools, and dont operate them outside their design spec electrically (which should be pretty hard to do on a properly designed mobo).



hmm.... didnt know this was this big of a deal...

so in other words, to save ur capacitors (in turn, ur motherboard), you should keep your system running real cool...

this still doesnt answer my question about, does it really matter if my motherboard is all solid state or just a few? more specifically, are there any better benefits to all solid state capacitors

sorry for the noobness
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July 9, 2008 9:35:44 PM

Al caps like all electric components will go bad over time.
That's just thermo dynamics in action.
That said the quality of the formula and the manufacturing process will also be a determining factor.
http://www.badcaps.net/
When you go to a few of the motherboard manufacturers sites you will find that they do indeed feature the fact that some of their boards have solid state caps.
Over time, I think that solid state caps will have a better performance curve when compared to normal caps.

I just wish that some motherboard manufacturers would be a bit more careful, I recently received a board from Asus where I RMA'ed a board to them for a bad southbridge. They sent me a board with bulging caps and one leaking cap. So I had to RMA that board too. I took 3 tries before I received a board that would pass my QA.
July 10, 2008 9:41:20 PM

interesting points guys, thank you for your time and your responses..

i will look for all solid state capacitors for my motherboard

i am currently looking at ga-x38-ds4....

thanks guys!
November 12, 2009 9:35:48 PM

just came across this thread, and found the following::
http://wi-fizzle.com/article/391

in short: the nice thing about solid state capacitors is that, in theory, they will last longer. The problem w/ the electrolytic capacitors is that the electrolyte "fluid" tends to dry up over time, causing them to fail.
a c 156 V Motherboard
November 14, 2009 9:59:41 AM

Oh SoS said:
The problem w/ the electrolytic capacitors is that the electrolyte "fluid" tends to dry up over time, causing them to fail.


True. But as long as "over time" means "some time after the useful life is over", who cares?

More importantly, solid caps reduce the rate of premature failures.


!