Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

1080i OTA on 32"

Last response: in Home Theatre
Share
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 11:53:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

What is it called when a 32" LCD needs to display a 1080i OTA signal but
only has a native resolution of 1366 x 768?
Does that scenario have the same potential for displaying a poor picture as
scaling a smaller OTA (720p) on a display that has 1080i native resolution?

Thanks,
Dan Foxley

More about : 1080i ota

Anonymous
August 19, 2005 12:15:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

A lot depends on you set's scaling software and electronics. On my Sony CRT
with a native resolution of 1080i, an original 720p signal (as ABC
originates it) looks great. The reverse would look good too with good
scaling electronics.

David
"Dan Foxley" <danfatnospamnethere.com> wrote in message
news:1124463183.193540@news-1.nethere.net...
> What is it called when a 32" LCD needs to display a 1080i OTA signal but
> only has a native resolution of 1366 x 768?
> Does that scenario have the same potential for displaying a poor picture
as
> scaling a smaller OTA (720p) on a display that has 1080i native
resolution?
>
> Thanks,
> Dan Foxley
>
>
August 19, 2005 3:29:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Dan Foxley wrote:

> What is it called when a 32" LCD needs to display a 1080i OTA signal but
> only has a native resolution of 1366 x 768?
Downconverting
> Does that scenario have the same potential for displaying a poor picture as
> scaling a smaller OTA (720p) on a display that has 1080i native resolution?
>
> Thanks,
> Dan Foxley
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 4:00:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Dan Foxley wrote:
> What is it called when a 32" LCD needs to display a 1080i OTA signal but
> only has a native resolution of 1366 x 768?
> Does that scenario have the same potential for displaying a poor picture as
> scaling a smaller OTA (720p) on a display that has 1080i native resolution?
>
> Thanks,
> Dan Foxley

Al digital TVs scale the picture from the signal source: 480i, 480p,
720p, 1080i to the resolution of the display. Even a 1920x1080 LCD is a
progressive display, so it has to scale the 1080i interleaved signal to
progressive.

Don't get too hung up on 1920x1080 resolution for smaller TVs under
40" to 50" unless you intend to use it as a desktop PC monitor. The
angular resolution of the human eye is generally regarded to be around 1
arc minute. At a typical sitting distance from the screen of 8 to 10
feet for a 32" or 37" widescreen, you would be hard pressed to tell the
difference between 1280x720, 1366x768, and 1920x1080 screens. In fact,
you would be unlikely to tell the difference at all. The benefits of a
true 1080 display really don't come into play for watching TV until you
get to 50" or bigger.

Improved pixel resolution is just part of the story with HD. All
digital with the elimination of analog noise, better and more accurate
color, progressive for the 720p channels are important too.

Alan F
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 10:22:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Fri, 19 Aug 2005 07:53:20 -0700 Dan Foxley <danfatnospamnethere.com> wrote:

| What is it called when a 32" LCD needs to display a 1080i OTA signal but
| only has a native resolution of 1366 x 768?

I would call it "something to avoid buying" under those conditions.

Matthew L. Martin would probably call it "wrong use of the term resolution".


| Does that scenario have the same potential for displaying a poor picture as
| scaling a smaller OTA (720p) on a display that has 1080i native resolution?

You can't get more than 720 lines out of either case. Ideally, upscaling
720 to 1080 should maintain all 720 lines. If the display is operating in
interlace mode, you will possibly see more artifacts and less motion quality
than if it were operating in 1080 progressive mode. A really good upscaler
could synthesize extra apparent resolution and give you the look and feel of
1080 on a 720 signal. But the difference between 1080 and 720 is not enough
to make such tricks worthwhile, IMHO. That might be nice on a 2160 display.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Phil Howard KA9WGN | http://linuxhomepage.com/ http://ham.org/ |
| (first name) at ipal.net | http://phil.ipal.org/ http://ka9wgn.ham.org/ |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
!