Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

OTA , 720 and Optimal Distance

Last response: in Home Theatre
Share
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 3:55:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hi, I am new to the HDTV / DLP world and am looking for some guidance.
Could anyone explain to a dummy (me) the answers to the following
questions:

1. What is the difference (in laymans terms) between 720p and 1080?
Really, I have no idea what either one means.

2. What is OTA? I see it mentioned online all the time. I have
DirecTV - and the DLP TV, and HD DVR on its way. I also live in Miami
- if that matters.

3. How far should I sit away from a 46" Samsung DLP (HLR4667w)? I've
heard all kinds of different things - 8 feet - 12 feet.

4. Is there a danger sitting closer than the recommended distance?

5. How important is it to be eye level to the center of a DLP screen?
I'm looking at getting a recliner chair that may sit lower than center
of the screen (with it on its stand). Is that not recommended?

Thank you very much for any info.
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 7:11:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

<starrynight@vangogh.com> wrote in message
news:q34ig1pphddntp0rq2pg93cbsjd3gcob2f@4ax.com...
> Hi, I am new to the HDTV / DLP world and am looking for some guidance.
> Could anyone explain to a dummy (me) the answers to the following
> questions:
>
> 1. What is the difference (in laymans terms) between 720p and 1080?
> Really, I have no idea what either one means.

720p source material has a resolution of 1280x720. The "p" represents a
progressive picture, which means displaying all 720 horizontal lines of the
picture during each refresh.

1080i source material has a resolution of 1920x1089. The "i" represents an
interlaced picture, which means displaying the even lines of the picture
during the 1st refresh, then the odd lines during the next refresh.

1080p is the same as 1080i except it is progressive.

> 2. What is OTA? I see it mentioned online all the time. I have
> DirecTV - and the DLP TV, and HD DVR on its way. I also live in Miami
> - if that matters.

It's "Over The Air". It's free signals you can receive using an antenna.
But you can only receive them if your TV has an HDTV tuner built in, or if
your TV is "HDTV Ready" and you buy a separate HD receiver.

You can go to www.titantv.com to see if the local stations in your area are
transmitting digital signals over-the-air yet. But even if they are, it
doesn't necessarily mean they're HD. TitanTV will indicate which programs
are actually being transmitted in HD. Although, from what I heard, this is
not always 100% reliable. If your local stations are transmitting digital
signals, I would call them and ask them if any of their OTA programming is
actually HD. For instance in my area, Fox transmits a digital signal, but
all programming is in SD (Standard Definition) over-the-air. However, oddly
enough, the signal they feed to my cable company does have HD programming.

> 3. How far should I sit away from a 46" Samsung DLP (HLR4667w)? I've
> heard all kinds of different things - 8 feet - 12 feet.

I have a 47" TV and I sit about 10 feet away from the screen. It's really a
personal preference I think.

> 4. Is there a danger sitting closer than the recommended distance?

No clue.

> 5. How important is it to be eye level to the center of a DLP screen?
> I'm looking at getting a recliner chair that may sit lower than center
> of the screen (with it on its stand). Is that not recommended?

Don't know. But the center of my TV screen is at eye level, and it seems
comfortable that way.



Dan
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 6:19:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Thank you Dan - that was helpful.

On Mon, 22 Aug 2005 03:11:24 GMT, "Dan P." <n0spam@n0spam.com> wrote:

>
><starrynight@vangogh.com> wrote in message
>news:q34ig1pphddntp0rq2pg93cbsjd3gcob2f@4ax.com...
>> Hi, I am new to the HDTV / DLP world and am looking for some guidance.
>> Could anyone explain to a dummy (me) the answers to the following
>> questions:
>>
>> 1. What is the difference (in laymans terms) between 720p and 1080?
>> Really, I have no idea what either one means.
>
>720p source material has a resolution of 1280x720. The "p" represents a
>progressive picture, which means displaying all 720 horizontal lines of the
>picture during each refresh.
>
>1080i source material has a resolution of 1920x1089. The "i" represents an
>interlaced picture, which means displaying the even lines of the picture
>during the 1st refresh, then the odd lines during the next refresh.
>
>1080p is the same as 1080i except it is progressive.
>
>> 2. What is OTA? I see it mentioned online all the time. I have
>> DirecTV - and the DLP TV, and HD DVR on its way. I also live in Miami
>> - if that matters.
>
>It's "Over The Air". It's free signals you can receive using an antenna.
>But you can only receive them if your TV has an HDTV tuner built in, or if
>your TV is "HDTV Ready" and you buy a separate HD receiver.
>
>You can go to www.titantv.com to see if the local stations in your area are
>transmitting digital signals over-the-air yet. But even if they are, it
>doesn't necessarily mean they're HD. TitanTV will indicate which programs
>are actually being transmitted in HD. Although, from what I heard, this is
>not always 100% reliable. If your local stations are transmitting digital
>signals, I would call them and ask them if any of their OTA programming is
>actually HD. For instance in my area, Fox transmits a digital signal, but
>all programming is in SD (Standard Definition) over-the-air. However, oddly
>enough, the signal they feed to my cable company does have HD programming.
>
>> 3. How far should I sit away from a 46" Samsung DLP (HLR4667w)? I've
>> heard all kinds of different things - 8 feet - 12 feet.
>
>I have a 47" TV and I sit about 10 feet away from the screen. It's really a
>personal preference I think.
>
>> 4. Is there a danger sitting closer than the recommended distance?
>
>No clue.
>
>> 5. How important is it to be eye level to the center of a DLP screen?
>> I'm looking at getting a recliner chair that may sit lower than center
>> of the screen (with it on its stand). Is that not recommended?
>
>Don't know. But the center of my TV screen is at eye level, and it seems
>comfortable that way.
>
>
>
> Dan
>
Related resources
September 5, 2005 7:31:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

<starrynight@vangogh.com> wrote in message
news:ls1lg11hn8f4ef94h9javsrip93f777r6k@4ax.com...
> Thank you Dan - that was helpful.
>
> On Mon, 22 Aug 2005 03:11:24 GMT, "Dan P." <n0spam@n0spam.com> wrote:
>
>>
>><starrynight@vangogh.com> wrote in message
>>news:q34ig1pphddntp0rq2pg93cbsjd3gcob2f@4ax.com...
>>> Hi, I am new to the HDTV / DLP world and am looking for some guidance.
>>> Could anyone explain to a dummy (me) the answers to the following
>>> questions:
>>>
>>> 1. What is the difference (in laymans terms) between 720p and 1080?
>>> Really, I have no idea what either one means.
>>
>>720p source material has a resolution of 1280x720. The "p" represents a
>>progressive picture, which means displaying all 720 horizontal lines of
>>the
>>picture during each refresh.
>>
>>1080i source material has a resolution of 1920x1089. The "i" represents
>>an
>>interlaced picture, which means displaying the even lines of the picture
>>during the 1st refresh, then the odd lines during the next refresh.
>>
>>1080p is the same as 1080i except it is progressive.
>>
>>> 2. What is OTA? I see it mentioned online all the time. I have
>>> DirecTV - and the DLP TV, and HD DVR on its way. I also live in Miami
>>> - if that matters.
>>
>>It's "Over The Air". It's free signals you can receive using an antenna.
>>But you can only receive them if your TV has an HDTV tuner built in, or if
>>your TV is "HDTV Ready" and you buy a separate HD receiver.
>>
>>You can go to www.titantv.com to see if the local stations in your area
>>are
>>transmitting digital signals over-the-air yet. But even if they are, it
>>doesn't necessarily mean they're HD. TitanTV will indicate which programs
>>are actually being transmitted in HD. Although, from what I heard, this
>>is
>>not always 100% reliable. If your local stations are transmitting digital
>>signals, I would call them and ask them if any of their OTA programming is
>>actually HD. For instance in my area, Fox transmits a digital signal, but
>>all programming is in SD (Standard Definition) over-the-air. However,
>>oddly
>>enough, the signal they feed to my cable company does have HD programming.
>>
>>> 3. How far should I sit away from a 46" Samsung DLP (HLR4667w)? I've
>>> heard all kinds of different things - 8 feet - 12 feet.
>>
>>I have a 47" TV and I sit about 10 feet away from the screen. It's really
>>a
>>personal preference I think.
>>
>>> 4. Is there a danger sitting closer than the recommended distance?
>>
>>No clue.
>>
>>> 5. How important is it to be eye level to the center of a DLP screen?
>>> I'm looking at getting a recliner chair that may sit lower than center
>>> of the screen (with it on its stand). Is that not recommended?
>>
>>Don't know. But the center of my TV screen is at eye level, and it seems
>>comfortable that way.
>>
>>
>>
>> Dan
>>


The minimum recommended viewing distance is 3X the measured diagonal of the
television screen. In the case of the 46" that would be 11.5 feet minimum.
Close viewing reveals artifacts that would go otherwise unnoticed at a
greater distance. I view mine at a bit more than 3X distance.

BC
Anonymous
September 6, 2005 3:20:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <PxZSe.156$nt1.111@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com>,
BC <bcphoto@core.com> wrote:
>
>>>I have a 47" TV and I sit about 10 feet away from the screen. It's really
>>>a
>>>personal preference I think.
>
>The minimum recommended viewing distance is 3X the measured diagonal of the
>television screen. In the case of the 46" that would be 11.5 feet minimum.
>Close viewing reveals artifacts that would go otherwise unnoticed at a
>greater distance. I view mine at a bit more than 3X distance.

Yeah, I happen to like the picture big, so it more or less fills my
field of view. I have an 85" image (projector not CRT!) from which I'm
about 9.5". Looks good to me.

>>>> 4. Is there a danger sitting closer than the recommended distance?

Well, despite being substantially closer that suggested above and it
feels fine, there is a definite issue with being closer still.

At one point I had friends round who took all the sofa seats, so I sat
about another few foot in front. 85" from about 5'-6' is *very*
unpleasant just from everything being too big! I geuss it's probably
related to your resting focal point.

>>>> 5. How important is it to be eye level to the center of a DLP screen?
>>>> I'm looking at getting a recliner chair that may sit lower than center
>>>> of the screen (with it on its stand). Is that not recommended?

My eye level is about level with the bottom of my image. The natural
head position even when sat properly in the chair is slightly upwards,
so it works well. Be careful to make sure your chair prevents you from
slouching too much as you'll put unnecessary strain on your back.

Also, if you haven't got a DLP yet, try it out first. I'm glad I saw my
friend's DLP before I bought a projector, as I learnt during the first
film I watched that I can't stand the rainbow effect. His was probably
one of the cheaper DLPs though, so YMMV.

Ralf.

--
Ranulf Doswell | Please note this e-mail address
www.ranulf.net | expires one month after posting.
Anonymous
September 6, 2005 3:23:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <431cd2c0$0$3556$da0feed9@news.zen.co.uk>, I wrote:
>
>Yeah, I happen to like the picture big, so it more or less fills my
>field of view. I have an 85" image (projector not CRT!) from which I'm
>about 9.5". Looks good to me.

Clearly, I meant 9.5'... otherwise my head would have been in the way!

Ralf.
--
Ranulf Doswell | Please note this e-mail address
www.ranulf.net | expires one month after posting.
Anonymous
September 6, 2005 11:39:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

BC wrote:

> The minimum recommended viewing distance is 3X the measured diagonal of the
> television screen.

Recommended by whom?

> In the case of the 46" that would be 11.5 feet minimum.

I sit that distance from my 56" 16:9 NTSC display. I will sit that
distance from whatever display I get unless I go substantially more than
84".

> Close viewing reveals artifacts that would go otherwise unnoticed at a
> greater distance. I view mine at a bit more than 3X distance.
>

Cleary YMDV, but I will continue with my current seating distance.

Matthew

--
"... Mr. (Gregory) LaCava, a producer-director who could be called a
genius except for the fact that Orson Welles has debased the term ...",
H. Allen Smith, "Lost in the Horse Latitudes"
September 9, 2005 7:53:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Matthew L. Martin" <nothere@notnow.never> wrote in message
news:11hr00e3pa0aa5c@corp.supernews.com...
> BC wrote:
>
>> The minimum recommended viewing distance is 3X the measured diagonal of
>> the television screen.
>
> Recommended by whom?
>
>> In the case of the 46" that would be 11.5 feet minimum.
>
> I sit that distance from my 56" 16:9 NTSC display. I will sit that
> distance from whatever display I get unless I go substantially more than
> 84".
>
>> Close viewing reveals artifacts that would go otherwise unnoticed at a
>> greater distance. I view mine at a bit more than 3X distance.
>>
>
> Cleary YMDV, but I will continue with my current seating distance.
>
> Matthew
>
> --
> "... Mr. (Gregory) LaCava, a producer-director who could be called a
> genius except for the fact that Orson Welles has debased the term ...",
> H. Allen Smith, "Lost in the Horse Latitudes"
>

I think that the TV manufacturers recommend that distance. There are some
established viewing distances for photos and paintings too. If there is a
big painting to display then make the people stand back. If it is a small
painting let them get closer. Pretty damn simple. I have seen people
reading books with their eyes a couple of inches away and I assumed that
they were visually impaired now I have to suspect that some were just
stupid.

BC
!