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NOOB Colling Question

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March 2, 2009 1:23:55 AM

Well I just put together my first "custom" computer. It's a Q9400 on the Asus P5QL Pro system.

I'm not sure how much cooling I'll need for this. Nothing fancy for video card, but I'm hoping to OC the PCU to 3.0 with a FSB of 375.

What kind of cooling would I need for this? It's not a gaming maching. used for CAD, Adobe and 3Dsmax9 work.

I put in a 120mm fan...is this enough?

Does the mother board come with a heatsink? Are the Northbridge coolers worth adding?

Thanks,

J

More about : noob colling question

a c 86 K Overclocking
March 2, 2009 2:13:45 AM

Google motherboard cooling for your mother board. Google NB cooling. Google overclocking. Find a few good forums to be a member of. Become a member and learn and ask. Better this way than having to take a stab in the dark and hope someone answers you right. Spend a few days learning and reading a lot.

120 MM fan on what? Case? NB? PCU, known as a CPU?

Google is your friend.
March 2, 2009 3:06:51 AM

Thanks,

I've been reading lots. The problem is I can't find the answer as to whether I need a CPU cooler or not. Is the stock cooler enough?

The 120mm fan is a case fan, which I'm keeping either way. Just trying to decide whether I need a heatsink or a heatsink and fan.

J
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March 2, 2009 3:34:44 AM

My local store carries both Zalman CNPS 7000 and 7700 series (Cu and AlCu).

I know that they both have good reviews, but I'm concerned about the weight of the 7700 series. Socket 775 is rated to a max of 450g. The 7700 weighs 600g.

J
a c 86 K Overclocking
March 2, 2009 4:27:19 AM

You don't play soccer with it or get stoopid moving it to lan parties you'll be fine. You know the Mobo will have to come out and you have to learn proper TIM brands and applications of TIM and mounting methods? Ohhh whats TIM? Google.

The store carries those two. Are they any good? Google the name and the word review, it works wonders, you can see if they are any good.

Like I said above. Reading lots by your definition and the questions you asked means you don't know squat about reading lots or even how to ask questions yet. Lots is a few weeks, or a year.

Tough help. Better you learn than be messed up by another noob.
a b K Overclocking
March 2, 2009 8:55:15 AM

Hate to say it but he tough love approach is actually helpful, if you follow it, because if some noob or jerk tells you to go do something which you don't know what it does you can make your system FUBAR. Oh and read the OC sticky here a couple dozen times at least, it will help alot.

I researched OC'ing for about 6months till I felt comfortable OC'ing my system. And I OC about everything I could when I did, CPU, RAM, VGA, though to be honest I had the knowledge to do all that after a few weeks. I was just extra cautious because I couldn't afford to replace anything if anything went wrong.


I trust you find this link useful in finding out your processors max recommended temp and voltage.
http://processorfinder.intel.com/
March 2, 2009 11:54:19 AM

The "tough love approach" is counter the point of a forum. I Have read a series of google articles. Lots and lots of them. The problem is that sometimes it's better to ask PEOPLE who are using the various products and have more exprience with them over the long run - hence the point of a forum. Besides, every arcticle tells a different story so it can sometimes be a useless compilation of data until you talk to product users that have first hand experience over the long term and not just "benchmark" tests. Furthermore, not everyone has time to read for six months before deciding on CPU cooling.

If you don't care to answer, then don't. I don't need to be "told" to google when I already have. I've seen it in a lot of other posts, and it's always the same people who have that same answer. Why even bother with the boards then? If all we have to do is google? I'm a member of many forums, and would never answer that way. At the very most I would provide a link or two with relavant and filtered information related to specific questions. Half the fun of forums is helping people. Anyways...

The local store is putting the system together so they'd be installing the heatsink and fan. I'm not comfortable working "inside" yet so that made sense for me, considering that they do it for free with any computer purchase.

I know all the max temps and voltages for my CPU and memory.

So, here I am again. Half the articles say that stock Intel fan and heatsink is fine, half the articles say to get another system. A lot of the articles that mention to get a separate CPU heatsink and fan as opposed to the intel stock seem to OC their systems. However, they seem to be overclocking in the higher ranges. Considering that I'm only wanting to OC mine to 3.0Ghz, should I be looking at something better than the stock Intel heatsink and fan? Any personal experience with these issues?

I'm also concerned about the weight. From my reading of articles - found through google searching - it seems that Socket 775 mounts are rated to 450g, where the Zalman 7000 AlCu is in the 600g range. Does anyone have personal experience with the weight issues? Obviously people are using Zalman fans with 775 mounts. I'm curious to know if any "damage" has been observed over time. Is the 450g just an extremely safe weight?

Thanks,

J

March 3, 2009 12:53:48 AM

I ended up buying the Vendetta 2 after reading some reviews. They had them 20% off at the local shop so the price was right.

I'll be monitoring the temps and if anything goes too high I'll work from there. As far as NB cooler I'm staying with stock for now and same with RAM.

I also have a 120mm case fan.

Should be ready to go tomorrow!

J
a c 86 K Overclocking
March 3, 2009 5:13:22 AM

Aha, so your not a PC hobby person. I get it. You'll let someone else do the work etc.

Dunno why your asking here when the store is your crutch to do all the work. Not like you have to worry if you don't do your research, the store will carry your warrenty if you made a bad choice.

Best of luck. I have had my hands in computers since the C64 (1984) days, never thought someone would get a store to install a CPU cooler, just isn't what I thought you were gonna do.

How awkward for both of us.

March 3, 2009 10:29:02 AM

Well considering I spend all my time working on design, drawings and renderings, I think it's fair to say that I don't want to spend that much more time learnign everything about computers.

Besides, I think people forget that the purpose of a forum is not only for advanced users but also beginners.

Whether I put it together or not, I don't think knowing what I'm getting and doing the research hurts at all. I told them to hold on the Vendetta 2 as I'm not sure whether it will block the RAM slots or be too heavy. I'm trying to find an answer to these two online but the most I can find is that most coolers that are worth it are somewhat large and heavy. Zalman has a few models that are smaller but not available around here. I could always order online...

J
March 3, 2009 11:35:28 AM

CanadaJ said:
Well considering I spend all my time working on design, drawings and renderings, I think it's fair to say that I don't want to spend that much more time learnign everything about computers.

Besides, I think people forget that the purpose of a forum is not only for advanced users but also beginners.

Whether I put it together or not, I don't think knowing what I'm getting and doing the research hurts at all. I told them to hold on the Vendetta 2 as I'm not sure whether it will block the RAM slots or be too heavy. I'm trying to find an answer to these two online but the most I can find is that most coolers that are worth it are somewhat large and heavy. Zalman has a few models that are smaller but not available around here. I could always order online...

J



Vendetta 2 is a fine cooler. If you are not overclocking and the guy putting your computer together know what he/she is doing, you should be fine. If anything goes wrong, you can always bring it back to the store as long as it is within your warranty. You should also ask your store these questions. You are paying them. Also, when you mention fan, you have to say what location on the case, or on the heatsink, and it is to push the air or pull the air. It is too vague to only say "I put in a 120mm fan...is this enough? "
a c 324 K Overclocking
March 3, 2009 2:37:36 PM

You have to stop and realize that these same questions get asked/answered 100's of times within a month and it really gets old to keep repeating the same thing over and over to someone who doesn't want to take a little time to do research. If you don't care about your computer, then don't ask for help if you only want what other people are going to tell you. Not everyone else has bucketloads of time either, but if you have the time to sign up on a forum and post a message, then you have time to do a little reading. If you don't have that time, then you don't need a different cooler then...it's a matter of importance. Just demanding that the forum masses reply and give you all the answers doesn't mean that you need to act 'holier than thou' when you don't get exactly what you are looking for. Different systems have different needs and different users want different products...its that simple.

You want a cooler; find one that fits your CPU and make a decision. Check the package...it will tell you what socket a heatsink fits; most have multiple mount options. A CPU usually comes with a generic heatsink/fan from Intel/AMD unless you get it OEM and it is CPU only.

Most motherboards have adequate NB cooling. You aren't going nuts with OC...you don't need more.

Where is this 120mm fan? Please specify.
March 3, 2009 11:05:00 PM

I guess I just view things differently. I'm a high ranking member on some very technical boards and would never even consider with a "tough love" attitude. If I don't care to answer, I just move on. I generally just like helping people and sharing what I know. Furthermore, I never "demanded" any mass response. Just asked a question. Not everyone will make researching computer hardware a priority, and in fact, this is the EXACT purpose of boards such as this - unless this one is completely different from all the other boards on the internet. I've learned so much from generous people on boards about a variety of subjects (salt water aquariums, all grain brewing, etc.) and never get a "google it" response.

From what I can find with "google", the Vendetta 2 can be a bit difficult to install due to its size (similar to other larger heatsink and fans). All the reviews say the same thing. I was just looking for some personal experience. I'm going into the store tomorrow and he's gona show me the fan on the motherboard so that I can see how much it will block the RAM slots. Since I plan on maxing the RAM soon, this will be a crucial factor in whether I get it or not. If I don't get it, I'll look around for a smaller model. Since I'm only going to OC @ 3.0Ghz for now, that should do. Again, the guys at the store will install it for me (I'll be there watching).

I also went with the 600W PSU instead of the 500W because I might decide on a much more power hungry video card down the line (if prices ever drop).

The guy at the store is also suggesting two 120mm fans - one in, one out - for a balanced neutral air flow. According to Wiki, this is ideal.

Cheers,

J
a c 86 K Overclocking
March 4, 2009 2:43:54 AM

If you had any idea how many people I help on this and many other forums. I had no idea you wanted to let the store to do the work and were relying on them and ONLY what they sold. It amazed me you said that.

Your first post was pretty much clueless and I could tell your concept of overclock was 'just set it and go'. I wasn't going to use my valuable time on this minor forum to coach someone who has no idea what to do and I could tell the amount of effort by, 'I put in a 120mm fan'. Right away, I knew you needed to learn a lot. How else but by more than 30 minutes on Google, if that. So I said use your tools and learn. You need to crawl first. Clueless means tons of silly questions and waitng for an answer when the tools are at your fingertips.

I stand by my 'learn by doing/learning' your own PC. Everyone else does the work themselves and really needs to get it right and takes responsibilty for their final product. Your going to watch them install the heatsink, good idea, maybe you'll learn something.

So the guy is suggesting 2 fans on the PC. Wow, you look at 100-200 rigs on the net as you do your research (smart informed person who wants to learn) and you say you found a Wiki link. .................................................
March 4, 2009 2:54:42 AM

Yes, a wiki link, along with many articles, comparisons, reviews, advice from other boards

Just don't answer if you don't feel you will be wasting your time. There seems to be a HUGE disconnect between serious enthusiasts and people looking for basic info on a specific system without investing 6 months research.

Anyways, found a board with much more helpful people. This is ridiculous.

Cheers,

J
March 4, 2009 3:39:46 AM

CanadaJ said:
Well I just put together my first "custom" computer. It's a Q9400 on the Asus P5QL Pro system.

I'm not sure how much cooling I'll need for this. Nothing fancy for video card, but I'm hoping to OC the PCU to 3.0 with a FSB of 375.

What kind of cooling would I need for this? It's not a gaming maching. used for CAD, Adobe and 3Dsmax9 work.

I put in a 120mm fan...is this enough?

Does the mother board come with a heatsink? Are the Northbridge coolers worth adding?

Thanks,

J


MBs have cooling solutions for NB and SB as a rule. Whether the MFGs design is 'good enough' will remain to be seen. (By you, unfortunately, when the MB fails...) But they have to build to meet their warranty... There are after-market coolers, and there are several temp measuring programs.

CPU HSFs... Stock is good enough at STOCK clocks. Intel and AMD do have warranties, so what they supply will do. Personally, I prefer the Thermalrights or the Noctua's. You will hear raves on this site about Xigmatek, but I rank them near the Zalman's.
March 4, 2009 8:57:37 PM

As for the weight thing (which seems never to have been properly answered), I wouldn't worry about it for fairly normal CPU coolers (and just about anything under about 800 or 900g is definitely in this range). If you wanted to get something like this, I'd be concerned with the weight, but that's a different class of heatsink entirely (and it weighs a freaking ton).
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