Recording HDTV to DVD

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

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Can I record an HDTV program to an DVD Recorder?

What specific types of hardware do I need?

I currently have a motorola HDTV-DVR and would like buy a DVD-RW and record
shows to it as well.

Is this possbile?
6 answers Last reply
More about recording hdtv
  1. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    Iron wrote:

    > X-No-Archive:yes
    >
    > Can I record an HDTV program to an DVD Recorder?
    >
    > What specific types of hardware do I need?
    >
    > I currently have a motorola HDTV-DVR and would like buy a DVD-RW and record
    > shows to it as well.
    >
    > Is this possbile?

    The simple answer is no. A standard DVD can only record NTSC 480i
    signals. You may be able to hook up the S-Video or composite output of
    the HD-DVR to the DVD recorder, but you will only record a downconverted
    to SD signal (and likely not very good picture quality for SD). A PC
    setup is able to put HD on a DVD, but not in standard format.

    That is why we have two upcoming HD disk formats for yet another
    format war: HD-DVD and Blu-Ray BD. But these will be expensive for the
    first several years. Look for HD-DVD vs Blu-Ray threads or news articles.

    Alan F
  2. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    "Iron" <X-No-Archive:yes@usenet.ca> wrote (in part):

    >Can I record an HDTV program to an DVD Recorder?

    If you mean a stand-alone DVD recorder, then no. None that I'm aware
    of will accept an HDTV signal or play it back if you could record it.
    That's coming, but not yet. The only stand-alone HD recorders I know
    of are D-VHS, and those without digital tuners require a firewire
    connection to a compatible tuner.

    However, if you can save the HD programs to a computer hard drive
    (typically as ATSC transport streams) then you can save them to DVD as
    ordinary data files and play them on the computer. A drawback is that
    a single-layer DVD can only hold about 40-50 minutes of HD, depending
    on compression, null stripping, etc.
    >
    >What specific types of hardware do I need?

    A computer with a DVD burner, an HDTV capture card, some connection to
    an HDTV display. And as much hard drive capacity as you can afford.
    VLC, a free program from www.videolan.org, can play them. However, my
    recommended solution is a MyHD MDP-130 PCI card, at least a 1 GHz PC
    running Windows XP (98 SE will do, but imposes some restrictions such
    as a 4 GB maximum file size and no firewire support). Comes with
    component output and you can add DVI for more money. HD output is
    independent of the computer's video output, although you can see a
    low-res overlay there if you wish. Burn the saved transport streams
    to DVD and play them from there if you wish. On the computer, of
    course; these are nothing a standard DVD player would recognize. I've
    done that and it works, but more and more I'm finding that buying hard
    drives on sale and removeable trays for them is more practical than
    DVDs, even though it's still more expensive.
    >
    >I currently have a motorola HDTV-DVR and would like buy a DVD-RW and record
    >shows to it as well.
    >
    >Is this possbile?

    Not unless the Motorola has firewire output to go to a D-VHS and you
    can rig up a computer to look like a D-VHS to it.

    Del Mibbler
  3. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    On Tue, 23 Aug 2005 16:18:28 GMT Del Mibbler <mibbler@nycap.rr.com> wrote:

    | However, if you can save the HD programs to a computer hard drive
    | (typically as ATSC transport streams) then you can save them to DVD as

    Do you know of ant external (e.g. STB style) tuners that can provide
    the ATSC transport stream for a computer (such as via Firewire, USB
    or fast ethernet)?

    Alternatively, a capture card would be workable, if (and only if) it
    can be used with Linux (source code drivers) and provides the ATSC
    stream (the 19.39 mbps bit stream).

    Of course, the next question is how to take that captured and stored
    ATSC stream and send it back out so a TV display or STB thinks it is
    getting genuine ATSC like OTA. Maybe an RF modulator? What I want to
    do is not burning DVDs, but just be able to playback delayed progamming
    while managing it with my own software.

    If I can get the ATSC bit stream as is, I'm sure I can figure out how
    to extract the specific channel to cut down on storage requirement, and
    reconstruct the ATSC during playback (insert dummy content for the other
    virtual channels). I'm just looking for a demodulator that will take
    the signal from RF all the way through trellis decoding to get the raw
    bit stream (before demultiplexing), and a corresponding modulator that
    will take that already multiplexed bit stream and do all the steps from
    trellis encoding to RF up conversion and VSB filtering to a single real
    channel (agile would be nice, but single frequency would be usable).

    --
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    | Phil Howard KA9WGN | http://linuxhomepage.com/ http://ham.org/ |
    | (first name) at ipal.net | http://phil.ipal.org/ http://ka9wgn.ham.org/ |
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
  4. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    On 24 Aug 2005 14:30:21 GMT, phil-news-nospam@ipal.net wrote:

    >
    > Do you know of ant external (e.g. STB style) tuners that can provide
    > the ATSC transport stream for a computer (such as via Firewire, USB
    > or fast ethernet)?

    AFAIK: they don't exist.

    >
    > Alternatively, a capture card would be workable, if (and only if) it
    > can be used with Linux (source code drivers) and provides the ATSC
    > stream (the 19.39 mbps bit stream).
    >

    ATI makes the HDTV Wonder that tunes OTA and saves it to disk. I don't
    think you get a pure ATSC stream, but it is close.

    > Of course, the next question is how to take that captured and stored
    > ATSC stream and send it back out so a TV display or STB thinks it is
    > getting genuine ATSC like OTA. Maybe an RF modulator?

    It does not exist. It is not as simple as you would think. It not only
    would have to do the RF part it would have to compress on the fly. Someday
    we will have this.

    > What I want to
    > do is not burning DVDs, but just be able to playback delayed progamming
    > while managing it with my own software.

    You can play it back over component video, VGA or some other analog method
    from your PC. There are digital options as well.

    Brad H
  5. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    On Wed, 24 Aug 2005 14:30:21 +0000, phil-news-nospa wrote:


    > Alternatively, a capture card would be workable, if (and only if) it can
    > be used with Linux (source code drivers) and provides the ATSC stream
    > (the 19.39 mbps bit stream).
    >
    http://www.pchdtv.com/

    I have the HD-3000, and have been capturing OTA HDTV (and SDTV) since last
    year. It came with its own drivers, but is now supported by the DVB
    drivers in recent kernels. Other cards are supported by the DVB drivers,
    as well, but I have no personal experience with them.

    Some software captures the TS, some extracts the PS, some lets you choose.
    I'm happily using MythTV. Recent additions include using FireWire to
    control and grab from a cable STB. I haven't tried that; my cable
    company's offerings are expensive, don't carry all of the broadcasted
    streams, and drop the bitrate in order to cram more streams in a given
    channel. If I wanted premium channels, it might be worth it. Three PBS
    stations, each with multiple streams, pump out more than I have time to
    watch.

    Playback is via nVidia 6200 DVI output to an HDMI input. Once you've seen
    the flexibility that a real computer adds to a home theater, the cable and
    satellite boxes look like toys. STBs are designed to a low price point,
    suitable for use with a $300 TV. A high-end TV deserves a high-end user
    interface, which the wimpy microcontrollers used in STBs can't do well.
    Yeah, you can get decent video, but it's like trying to steer a Lexus with
    a tiller.

    If you don't like to tinker, though, use a standard STB. I'm willing to
    put effort into making things work the way I want, not the way that serves
    someone else's business model.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    In article <4b6hz1axpvbd$.1b7u61xcrewt5$.dlg@40tude.net>,
    Brad Houser <bradDOThouser@intel.com> wrote:

    | On 24 Aug 2005 14:30:21 GMT, phil-news-nospam@ipal.net wrote:
    |
    | >
    | > Do you know of ant external (e.g. STB style) tuners that can provide
    | > the ATSC transport stream for a computer (such as via Firewire, USB
    | > or fast ethernet)?
    |
    | AFAIK: they don't exist.

    The ElGato EyeTV 500 is an external tuner which decodes 8VSB or clear
    QAM, and outputs the transport stream via FireWire. However, it's
    associated software is Mac-only.

    -- Tim Olson
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