Best OTA Antenna -- I want for HDTV

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In your opinions what is the best OTA antenna and the range of that antenna
with a booster?

I realize that terrain, weather, etc. will cause deviations, but I would
like to know average -- not conservative results.

Are there any antennas that can pick up ststions 100+ miles away?
10 answers Last reply
More about best antenna hdtv
  1. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    So we can look up the HD stations near you, what's your zipcode?


    --
    Lorenzo, Posted this message at http://www.SatelliteGuys.US
  2. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    On Mon, 22 Aug 2005 23:41:26 -0400, "JTS" <jtshellnc@charter.net>
    wrote:

    >In your opinions what is the best OTA antenna and the range of that antenna
    >with a booster?
    >
    >I realize that terrain, weather, etc. will cause deviations, but I would
    >like to know average -- not conservative results.
    >
    >Are there any antennas that can pick up ststions 100+ miles away?
    >
    >

    Tuesday, August 23 2005, @ 9:03 AM (-0700 GMT)

    Hi JTS

    Visit www.titantv.com

    Aside from providing you with listing of all HD in your area, they
    will tell you the distance of the stations from your zip code, a
    suggested antenna type, and the compass bearing to point your antenna.
    If I remember correctly, I think they may also give an opinion on
    whether or not you need an LNA (low-noise amplifier).

    JoAnne
    WebMistress: http://www.antivirusyellowpages.com
  3. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    When I lived in the Sacramento California area I used a Terk38 for OTA HD
    reception. Not only did I get my locals in crystal clear but I also pulled
    several Bay Area stations in at night. That's about 125 Miles or so from
    where I was located.

    I plan on using another Terk when I move into my house in Parker Co.

    Matt

    "JTS" <jtshellnc@charter.net> wrote in message
    news:3lxOe.9712$1g2.240@fe05.lga...
    > In your opinions what is the best OTA antenna and the range of that
    > antenna
    > with a booster?
    >
    > I realize that terrain, weather, etc. will cause deviations, but I would
    > like to know average -- not conservative results.
    >
    > Are there any antennas that can pick up ststions 100+ miles away?
    >
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    JTS wrote:
    > In your opinions what is the best OTA antenna and the range of that antenna
    > with a booster?
    >
    > I realize that terrain, weather, etc. will cause deviations, but I would
    > like to know average -- not conservative results.
    >
    > Are there any antennas that can pick up ststions 100+ miles away?

    First, you need to determine how many UHF digital stations vs VHF
    digital stations are in your area. If all the digital stations are
    currently on UHF channels (their real broadcast channel, not the
    remapped to channel 4, 6, etc that you see on the display), then your
    priority is getting a large UHF antenna with VHF as a secondary concern.
    Some of major broadcast network digital channels will shift back to VHF
    when analog shutdown occurs, perhaps in early 2009, but that is a few
    years off. Check www.antennaweb.org for starters.

    I don't know if anyone can tell you what is the single best OTA
    antenna for all situations without a lot more info. The key to put a
    large antenna at the highest point possible on your roof or a nearby
    high point if you want to go after stations 100+ miles away. But this
    all depends on your local terrain - any hills or ridges between you and
    the stations? Nearby tree line? Are the stations in that city
    broadcasting at anywhere near full power for their digital channels?

    In my case, I have been experimenting with several UHF antennas to
    pick up Washington DC (about 20 miles) and Baltimore digital stations.
    The problem is that the cities are in different directions, so a very
    directional UHF antenna such as one I got from Radio Shack (Catalog #
    15-2160) has it's drawbacks. I have since been trying a 4 bowtie antenna
    from Channel Master, model 3021/4221 (www.channelmaster.com) with more
    success. I have been testing it from the top floor with a 13 dB
    amplifier so I should get better reception when it goes up into the
    attic crawl space. Next step is to try out a more powerful pre-amp, but
    pre-amps are not helpful for nearby stations.

    Hope this helps a bit.

    Alan F
  5. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    28601 Hickory, NC
    "Lorenzo" <Lorenzo.1u7f3y@satelliteguys.us> wrote in message
    news:Lorenzo.1u7f3y@satelliteguys.us...
    >
    > So we can look up the HD stations near you, what's your zipcode?
    >
    >
    > --
    > Lorenzo, Posted this message at http://www.SatelliteGuys.US
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    Thanks, any info helps.


    "afiggatt" <afiggatt@adelphia.net> wrote in message
    news:Ua2dnZ2dnZ35iemunZ2dncWwlt6dnZ2dRVn-z52dnZ0@adelphia.com...
    > JTS wrote:
    >> In your opinions what is the best OTA antenna and the range of that
    >> antenna
    >> with a booster?
    >>
    >> I realize that terrain, weather, etc. will cause deviations, but I would
    >> like to know average -- not conservative results.
    >>
    >> Are there any antennas that can pick up ststions 100+ miles away?
    >
    > First, you need to determine how many UHF digital stations vs VHF digital
    > stations are in your area. If all the digital stations are currently on
    > UHF channels (their real broadcast channel, not the remapped to channel 4,
    > 6, etc that you see on the display), then your priority is getting a large
    > UHF antenna with VHF as a secondary concern. Some of major broadcast
    > network digital channels will shift back to VHF when analog shutdown
    > occurs, perhaps in early 2009, but that is a few years off. Check
    > www.antennaweb.org for starters.
    >
    > I don't know if anyone can tell you what is the single best OTA antenna
    > for all situations without a lot more info. The key to put a large antenna
    > at the highest point possible on your roof or a nearby high point if you
    > want to go after stations 100+ miles away. But this all depends on your
    > local terrain - any hills or ridges between you and the stations? Nearby
    > tree line? Are the stations in that city broadcasting at anywhere near
    > full power for their digital channels?
    >
    > In my case, I have been experimenting with several UHF antennas to pick
    > up Washington DC (about 20 miles) and Baltimore digital stations. The
    > problem is that the cities are in different directions, so a very
    > directional UHF antenna such as one I got from Radio Shack (Catalog #
    > 15-2160) has it's drawbacks. I have since been trying a 4 bowtie antenna
    > from Channel Master, model 3021/4221 (www.channelmaster.com) with more
    > success. I have been testing it from the top floor with a 13 dB amplifier
    > so I should get better reception when it goes up into the attic crawl
    > space. Next step is to try out a more powerful pre-amp, but pre-amps are
    > not helpful for nearby stations.
    >
    > Hope this helps a bit.
    >
    > Alan F
    >
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    thank you.


    "JoAnne" <mwsoft@cox.net> wrote in message
    news:c6img1152kefi51bduk6e2ulp1uolgc2no@4ax.com...
    > On Mon, 22 Aug 2005 23:41:26 -0400, "JTS" <jtshellnc@charter.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>In your opinions what is the best OTA antenna and the range of that
    >>antenna
    >>with a booster?
    >>
    >>I realize that terrain, weather, etc. will cause deviations, but I would
    >>like to know average -- not conservative results.
    >>
    >>Are there any antennas that can pick up ststions 100+ miles away?
    >>
    >>
    >
    > Tuesday, August 23 2005, @ 9:03 AM (-0700 GMT)
    >
    > Hi JTS
    >
    > Visit www.titantv.com
    >
    > Aside from providing you with listing of all HD in your area, they
    > will tell you the distance of the stations from your zip code, a
    > suggested antenna type, and the compass bearing to point your antenna.
    > If I remember correctly, I think they may also give an opinion on
    > whether or not you need an LNA (low-noise amplifier).
    >
    > JoAnne
    > WebMistress: http://www.antivirusyellowpages.com
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    "Matt Mac Donagh" <gamefixer@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:aZmdnYAUT9wC2JbeRVn-ig@comcast.com...
    > When I lived in the Sacramento California area I used a Terk38 for OTA HD
    > reception. Not only did I get my locals in crystal clear but I also pulled
    > several Bay Area stations in at night. That's about 125 Miles or so from
    > where I was located.
    >
    > I plan on using another Terk when I move into my house in Parker Co.
    >
    > Matt
    >
    > "JTS" <jtshellnc@charter.net> wrote in message
    > news:3lxOe.9712$1g2.240@fe05.lga...
    >> In your opinions what is the best OTA antenna and the range of that
    >> antenna
    >> with a booster?
    >>
    >> I realize that terrain, weather, etc. will cause deviations, but I would
    >> like to know average -- not conservative results.
    >>
    >> Are there any antennas that can pick up ststions 100+ miles away?
    >>

    Over 60 miles on flat terrain and the curvature of the earth starts getting
    in the way. Terk antennas have a reputation for being overpriced and/or
    underperforming. At least the 30 series are only the former as Winegard
    makes them and equivalent Winegards cost less. Antennas that look like
    antennas have looked for years are the better performers. Channel Master,
    Winegard, and Antennas Direct are some of the better manufacturers but
    beware the "pretty" models as they don't work as well. Even Radio Shack does
    a decent job but their antennas are a bit flimsy. A good primer on antennas
    is http://www.hdtvprimer.com/ANTENNAS/types.html

    Some comparisons between antenna models may be found at
    http://www.hdtvprimer.com/ANTENNAS/comparing.html

    Pat
  9. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    JTS wrote:
    >
    > In your opinions what is the best OTA antenna and the range of that antenna
    > with a booster?
    >
    > I realize that terrain, weather, etc. will cause deviations, but I would
    > like to know average -- not conservative results.
    >
    > Are there any antennas that can pick up ststions 100+ miles away?


    I just ran some 95 mile tests of UHF Digital/HD channels in Wisc

    this past Sunday... Set up location: Wisc Rapids to Green Bay

    where Green Bay has all 7 networks Transmitting at full Power
    Digital.

    Yes, I picked up Wausau (38mi N)5/9 & Eau Claire (61 mi NW)2/9 Digital

    using no CM 7775 amplifier. With amplifier 9/9 bars & 7/9 bars.

    Set up was in Drive Way at 6' Step ladder level with lots of pine
    trees.

    Tuner was Samsung T-151, Antenna Channel Master 4228 8 bay bow
    tie($40),

    RG-6 Cable, & Channel Master UHF 7775 amplifier. I received no
    signal

    on all 7 GBay Digital UHF channels... & I used GPS 'angles' to aim
    antenna

    from house drive way to the Towers 95 miles away to East in each case.

    I needed more antenna elevation & time... but our family reunion took

    precedence. One Rapids relative just bought a new Sony KDF-E50A10
    LCD.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    "JTS" <jtshellnc@charter.net> wrote in news:3lxOe.9712$1g2.240@fe05.lga:

    > In your opinions what is the best OTA antenna and the range of that
    > antenna with a booster?

    That's not an easy question to answer. It depends on which stations and
    at what range you want to recieve them. For a particular station on a
    single channel, if you're desperate and rich enough, you could hand build
    a set of 16 yagis, phase them using foam RG11 and RG8 products that are
    very low loss, put a really hot GaAsFET preamp on the mast and get a
    signal from quite a good way out.

    > I realize that terrain, weather, etc. will cause deviations, but I
    > would like to know average -- not conservative results.
    >
    > Are there any antennas that can pick up ststions 100+ miles away?

    It will depend mostly on terrain and the elevations of the two antennas.
    Digital TV is not as easy as analog TV, because you need a stronger
    signal (compared to noises, including internal circuit noise) for
    decoding to work. Of course, once it works, you get a perfect picture,
    so you kind of have to work to bring your signal up over that threshold.

    If I was just experimenting and had the real estate for it, I would put
    up a good (lightning-arrested) roofmount mast with a rotor and a VHF-UHF
    log periodic antenna on it and the best antenna-mount preamp that I could
    find. That will get most of what is there to be got. You may also find
    that, on days when there is a bit of a temperature inversion (happens
    fairly regularly in late spring along the east coast for example), that
    you get a whole lot more stations, maybe even too many, causing
    interference.

    --
    Dave Oldridge+
    ICQ 1800667
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