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Installing LED's into a computer Guide?

Last response: in Components
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July 1, 2008 6:51:54 AM

I would avoid taking apart the psu just to install LEDs, as it voids most warranties from manufacturers.
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July 1, 2008 7:16:07 AM

Alright then how about just wiring and installing LEDs on other parts of the case (and NO install led fan solutions please).
July 1, 2008 11:03:59 AM

Be careful with the PSU. The big capacitor carries a charge that can put you from mingeling with your PSU straight to the nasty zone.
Take precautions or let some idiot lick it before you start working. Don't forget the Resistors or your LEDs might be quite shortlived.
July 1, 2008 11:59:38 AM

solance said:
where can i find a guide on how to wire and install LED's into a computers PSU


I do not want to sound like a smartass, but if you need to ask for help to do something like this, you are better off not doing it. In addition to the risks of damaging something, lethal voltages are present inside the PSU.
July 1, 2008 12:08:10 PM

^
Even when it's been disconnected from the mains for hours...
July 1, 2008 2:57:39 PM

Aye i guess i asked my question in the wrong way, i am just wanting to wire LEDs for the case that are powered by the power supply. not actually add them into the PSU.
July 1, 2008 3:08:59 PM

solance said:
Aye i guess i asked my question in the wrong way, i am just wanting to wire LEDs for the case that are powered by the power supply. not actually add them into the PSU.

Her you go.
July 1, 2008 3:22:48 PM

Yeah, DO NOT MOD the PSU. Voids any warranty, has the potential to ruin the performance of it. And it's about like messing with the back of a CRT monitor if you don't know what you're doing.

Nothing like a good 5-10amps at 10k-20k volts to remind you how mortal you are.

Now as far as having them powered by the PSU, that's just a matter of wiring the leads to a 4pin molex connector. Just make sure the LED's are rated to run off 12v power. Otherwise you'll need to throw a resistor into the circuit to lower the amount of current going through.

You know this just made me have the idea of possibly modding that old Antec, or Lian Li case that I use to use. Through together an LED layout that would make it look like one of those old computers you'd see on TV with all the useless lights. Either that or set up the LEDs to make it look like it's changing colors inside the case. I've got all the 555 timers and other things laying around that I'd need to be able to pull it off.
July 1, 2008 3:37:11 PM

in the power supply, voltages only go to 120V DC.
Granted those capacitors in the PS can discharge in a millisecond, there is enough power in there to kill AT LEAST 3 people.
I can provide the math if need be.
July 1, 2008 5:29:27 PM

the last resort said:
in the power supply, voltages only go to 120V DC.
Granted those capacitors in the PS can discharge in a millisecond, there is enough power in there to kill AT LEAST 3 people.
I can provide the math if need be.


Well, yes they're only rated to charge to capacity at 120v, when they shock discharge to a ground, or person, that changes. Most CRT tubes only charge at 110v. Gotta remember that that tube is basically a giant capacitor though. Same thing for the large caps in psu's though.
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