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32MB cache and 16MB cache...Both together?

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August 28, 2009 7:39:57 AM

Hi, I have a 250GB WD hard disk and it's cache is 16MB. I use another 160GB disk with the same cache for my windows and linux i dual boot. I want to buy a 500GB WD with 32MB cache. MY question is this... Where do i put my operating system in order to have the best OS and game performance? I was thinking of removing the 160GB and installing my operating systems on the 500GB as well as the games. The 250GB will be for videos and music. What should i do?

More about : 32mb cache 16mb cache

August 28, 2009 9:46:46 AM

Install the games and OS on the 500GB. Use the 160GB and 250GB for storage. The 500GB would definitely be faster but not because of the cache but advancements in other aspects, controller, head, firmware, etc.
August 28, 2009 10:03:28 AM

And I suggest going with 640gb rather than 500gb version. It has more dense platters.
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a b G Storage
August 28, 2009 10:31:38 AM

Current WD 500 GB drives have two 250 GB platters. Current WD 640 Blacks have two 320 GB platters. That makes the 640's a little faster.

Probably this winter or next spring, we should see 500 GB single platter drives from WD. But I think that right now, all of their 500 GB platters are going into their 1.5 and 2.0 TB drives.
August 28, 2009 10:55:15 AM

Sweet thanks guys. I will go with the 640GB since the price increases just for 10 pounds. I will install both windows and linux as well as my games on it and use the other hard drives for media
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a b G Storage
August 28, 2009 9:18:52 PM

Something that I found surprising in my recent research of spindle harddrives was that the larger drives were also faster because of the data density.. It makes sense though. You can easily overload a 32mb cache depending on where the data you're accessing is... So you have to change metaphors a bit and consider the total data covered per rotation multiplied by the number of rotations per second. This gives you a better metric for judging a wider range of real world applications although obviously it is not the only factor to determine what will be faster for your particular situation.
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