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Which processor is better for laptop.

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July 7, 2008 3:47:21 AM

Is the x9000 at 2.8 better for laptop or q9450 or something around that quad core area. The laptop will be majorly used for gaming.

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July 7, 2008 3:56:43 AM

Although some might disagree I think that for gaming the fastest dual core you can find would be your best option for a laptop. It will consume less power than a quad and there are only a couple games that utilize more than 2 cores anyway.
July 7, 2008 3:57:52 AM

btw, the q9450 is a desktop processor.
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July 7, 2008 3:59:59 AM

Yeah, if you find a laptop that runs the Q9450, it probably isn't too portable :p 
July 7, 2008 4:09:15 AM

ausch30 said:
Although some might disagree I think that for gaming the fastest dual core you can find would be your best option for a laptop. It will consume less power than a quad and there are only a couple games that utilize more than 2 cores anyway.



^Good thinking.



OP:
Are you going to be using this on battery a lot?
July 7, 2008 4:17:59 AM

Thanks for the comments.

I'm not really looking for portability, but desktop replacement laptop. And yes I know its a desktop processor but there are current places where a could buy laptops with those.

And, which processor would anyone recommend me for a gaming laptop.

No i wont be using the battery alot.

Thanks in advance.
July 7, 2008 4:25:57 AM

What kind of gaming are you talking about?

Gaming on laptops are getting better with dedicated GPU modules, but are still behind desktop gaming rigs in overall quality/performance.

I would look at what kind of gaming you intend you play, and see if a gaming laptop is the best for your needs. Check out reviews of Dell XPS or Alienware gaming lappies for a good comparasion.

Here is a link that might help you out a bit:
http://computershopper.com/top-products/top_5_gaming_laptops

But do some research on your own to find the laptop that fits your gaming needs.
July 7, 2008 4:31:43 AM

I might buy the xps m1730 with 4 or 2 gb, sli 8700 and x9000....but I am a little undecided because I have found other places that offer me desktops processors and one 8800 gtx on the laptop...so I dont know if to stay with the trusty and nice looks of dell or go to, more affordable and desktop processor and one gtx of sager or ibuypower or cyberpowerpc, wich I still dont really trust.
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July 7, 2008 5:37:52 AM

You'd get a LOT more performance in an XPS 1730 if you put your money towards SLI 8800M GTX's and dropped the CPU a bit (to something like a T9500 @ 2.6 or even lower)

The X9000 is great of course, and if you can afford it, the best would be an X9000 and a pair of 8800m GTX's, but if you have to sacrifice one, you'll lose far less performance by dropping the CPU than the GPU.
a b D Laptop
July 7, 2008 5:45:41 AM

If you want unbeatable performance, go with Sager and don't look anywhere else.

An X9000 and two 8800m GTX's will rock your world.
The Sager NP9262 is for you.


You better have a big bank roll, though.


But, for gaming, a faster clocked dual core will always beat a lower clocked quad core.

At least, for now.
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July 7, 2008 5:49:11 AM

I would wait because a mobile version of the 4850 will surely arrive soon and that will blow away any NVidia offering for a laptop.

Also the recent stories about NVidia mobile graphics processors which are failing due to defects in the packaging for the die are a bit of a worry. Looks like that is mainly to do with 6 and 7 series Chips though.

cjl's advice is good ... he is a rocket scientist ... I am merely a professor.
July 7, 2008 2:16:12 PM

Well, this is just another reason asking before buying is always good. Thanks for the comments everyone, now I will plan better what to buy.
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July 7, 2008 3:05:43 PM

enmaalvb said:
Thanks for the comments.

I'm not really looking for portability, but desktop replacement laptop. And yes I know its a desktop processor but there are current places where a could buy laptops with those.

And, which processor would anyone recommend me for a gaming laptop.

No i wont be using the battery alot.

Thanks in advance.


Could you possibly use a small-form-factor desktop with a micro-ATX case instead? In my experience, laptops are pretty much only the right choice if they intend to carry it around and run it off the battery frequently. Otherwise, a smaller desktop system offers more power for less money and doesn't take up much more space than a huge laptop. Both big laptops and desktops pretty much stay parked on the desk and never leave, defeating the only advantage of a laptop in the first place. About the only type of situation where a huge notebook would make sense is if you have to move the unit frequently or put it away but do not have to carry the unit with you or get away from a power outlet. OTR trucking would be an example of that as they can pull the notebook out when they are not driving and plug it in but stow it away when they are driving, something that's harder to do with a desktop.

That's just something to think about. If you would perhaps give us your usage situation that might help as well.
July 7, 2008 5:08:26 PM

Thanks for the idea but don't use the battery but would plug in anywhere I can and I don't mind the bulky 17 inch laptop. But thanks anyway.

I want a desktop replacement laptop, could be 15 or 17 inch, I want it to play wherever theres a plug, or when I need to go the another city or a vacation and being able to still play or browse internet from any wifi connection I find from a neighbour (Because here in Dominican Republic there arent lots of malls or locals with wifi)

Now that I have rethinked what I'll buy Im stuck between these three choices.
*the sager 17in with the e8400 dual core at 3.0 sli 8800gtx and 2gb ram 1680 res in about $3200

*the dell 17 in 1920 resolution t9300 2.5 gh sli 8800 gtx and 4gb ram and the very nice looks, $3400

*Alienware 15 in 1680 res and t9300 2.5 one 8800 gtx and 2gb ram around $2800

The Sager seems to output alot of power, same as the dell, but the dell has a very nice looks and I trust more dell, I dont really know sager, first time I hear about it (If anyone has bought please info me) and the alienware is just for a budget and as a emergency option.

I got the money and would really like to get a laptop and I am a expirienced desktop user so dont flame about the money issue please.

Thanks in advance would like to hear your opinions.
July 7, 2008 6:45:26 PM

don't pay for memory upgrades, buy the minimum and upgrade yourself. its cheaper that way. sometimes better CPUs and HDD are also cheaper to get the minimum and upgrade yourself.

Laptops are like cars, they make all the money on the add ons. unfortuaneatly for them its easy to upgrade laptops
July 7, 2008 7:00:29 PM

So imagine I buy the dell with the lowest cpu, would I be able to buy a the cpu I wanted from another place like Ebay, Newegg or something like that. And if so, would it be easy or doable, and where would I find a guide.
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July 7, 2008 10:08:44 PM

I would not upgrade the CPU myself - it's doable, but there's no reason to, and it will likely cost more. What you should upgrade yourself is the RAM. Get the 1730 with the minimum amount of RAM (2GB IIRC). Looking at Dell's website, they want $150 to upgrade the RAM from 2 to 4 GB. Instead, get it with 2 and get something like this for far less money than dell wants for the upgrade.

Oh, and that Dell config looks quite nice. It's the one I would pick out of the ones you listed.
July 7, 2008 11:12:04 PM

I've never swapped a laptop CPU, but it some cases It would save hundreds of dollars. if its not going to save you much, I wouldn't bother.
the big problem is dealing with the heat sink.

with memory, on the other hand, it made to be simple, and a pretty significant savings
July 7, 2008 11:16:39 PM

Yeah, thats a good idea.

I think Ill go with the Dell. Looks nicer and I trust it more. but if I get a few bucks less ill probably go for the sager.
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July 7, 2008 11:29:38 PM

groo said:
I've never swapped a laptop CPU, but it some cases It would save hundreds of dollars. if its not going to save you much, I wouldn't bother.
the big problem is dealing with the heat sink.

with memory, on the other hand, it made to be simple, and a pretty significant savings


As far as CPU's are concerned, from what I've found, the problem is that notebook CPU's are such a low volume component that they are very hard to find, and tend to be quite expensive when sold separately. I've yet to see a case when it would be cheaper to buy an upgrade separately rather than just getting it with the notebook in the first place.
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July 8, 2008 3:33:59 AM

groo said:
I've never swapped a laptop CPU, but it some cases It would save hundreds of dollars. if its not going to save you much, I wouldn't bother.
the big problem is dealing with the heat sink.


Replacing a standard pin-grid-array (socketed) laptop chip isn't really any harder than replacing a desktop chip. There are three hard things in replacing a laptop CPU though:

1. Making sure your laptop's BIOS will support a newer chip. If your laptop didn't have a specific chip as a purchase option at some point, chances are about 100% that it will not support it, even if it's just a die shrink or a different stepping. Welcome to the don't-mess-with-the-black-box world of OEM computers...

2. Getting a suitable processor to replace your existing one. You can generally find high-end Core 2 Duo notebook processors easily and also Celeron Ms but lower-end C2Ds, Pentium Dual Cores, and about any socket S1 AMD mobile chip is hard to impossible to find.

3. Getting the computer apart enough to remove the heatpipe and heatsink arrangement without breaking the cheap plastic nubs on the parts that snap closed to hold the notebook's case together.

Once you have the new processor in hand, the BIOS will support it, and you have the computer apart enough to remove the heatsink and heatpipe assembly, it's almost identical to removing and replacing a desktop CPU. The only differences are that you have to unscrew the heatsink/heatpipe assembly and possibly fan instead of unclamping them and there is a screw that controls the clamping of the ZIF socket rather than a lever. The rest is the same- pick up old CPU, take some solvent to the heatsink and remove old thermal grease, reapply new thermal grease, insert processor, clamp the socket, then reattach and refasten the heatsink. I have changed several notebook CPUs and this is the procedure I used on all of them. However, note that most LV and all ULV processors are ball grid array units and have no socket- they are directly soldered to the motherboard like a chipset is soldered to the motherboard. They are most certainly not replaceable.

Quote:
with memory, on the other hand, it made to be simple, and a pretty significant savings

Sometimes it is simple and sometimes less so. Dell in particular does not make it easy to replace memory as the #1 DIMM slot is underneath the keyboard on almost all models. If you know it's there and have a service guide PDF open to locate the screws and pry points, it adds maybe two minutes to the job, but if you don't have the guide or have never worked on Dells, it adds quite a bit of trouble. Some laptops even have some memory soldered onto the motherboard and it is not replaceable. The 12" PowerBooks and the Dell D400 series come to mind as they are set up that way and only have one user-replaceable DIMM.
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July 8, 2008 4:14:05 AM

Thanks, more knowledge is always useful.
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July 8, 2008 4:58:50 AM

MU_Engineer said:

Sometimes it is simple and sometimes less so. Dell in particular does not make it easy to replace memory as the #1 DIMM slot is underneath the keyboard on almost all models. If you know it's there and have a service guide PDF open to locate the screws and pry points, it adds maybe two minutes to the job, but if you don't have the guide or have never worked on Dells, it adds quite a bit of trouble. Some laptops even have some memory soldered onto the motherboard and it is not replaceable. The 12" PowerBooks and the Dell D400 series come to mind as they are set up that way and only have one user-replaceable DIMM.

Not on any Dell that I've used, aside from the Latitude series (which are a pain, as one SO-DIMM is under the keyboard). As far as the XPS series go though, my XPS M1710 has both SO-DIMMs easily accessible with two screws and a little access plate on the bottom, and I would guess the 1730 would be the same. The Inspirons tend to be pretty easy too from what I've seen.
July 8, 2008 11:27:03 AM

whan I was specing my gateway, I would have saved money on a highend CPU and a bigger HDD by getting them from newegg.

I ended up getting the notbook ripped off b4 I felt the need to upgrade either. I did upgrade the memory right off the batt, and it saved me about $150.
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July 8, 2008 4:54:11 PM

cjl said:
Not on any Dell that I've used, aside from the Latitude series (which are a pain, as one SO-DIMM is under the keyboard). As far as the XPS series go though, my XPS M1710 has both SO-DIMMs easily accessible with two screws and a little access plate on the bottom, and I would guess the 1730 would be the same. The Inspirons tend to be pretty easy too from what I've seen.


The Dells I've worked on have been mostly Latitudes (D6xx, D531) but there have been a few Inpsirons in there too. IIRC the Inspiron 6000 had both DIMMs accessible from the bottom memory access panel but the Inspiron 700m had one under the keyboard. I've worked on a few HPs, Gateways, and Apples and those all had RAM accessible from the bottom if it was user-replaceable.
July 9, 2008 3:32:59 AM

Damn after making research, I was going to make a mistake, I'm now going for the Sager, Dell is awesome, but after a more realistic view I realized I'd be getting more future proof of the Sager (and less money) and more speed. And yes I'm going for the sli gtx (can't wait till I got all the money).

Thanks everyone for the help and point of views.
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July 9, 2008 4:30:40 AM

That is an excellent choice as well. IMHO, you can't go wrong with either a Dell XPS or a Sager. :) 
July 9, 2008 4:44:08 PM

As you going to be spending $3k on a laptop that will be staying in 1 spot most of the time. get a kensington lock.

when my house got broken into it was a grab and dash operation. I don't think they would have stuck around long enought to cut the cable, and even then they'd have a harder time selling a notebook with a lock hanging off the side.
July 9, 2008 5:02:39 PM

Well I got a gun and a couple machetes in my house, here in dominican republic there is'nt that much danger if you take care. The machetes are mostly for the garden just in case. lol
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