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OVERLY LONG FILE NAMES - as impediment to COPYING FILES

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Anonymous
August 16, 2005 1:21:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

I tend to use long file names, so as to identify needed files readily.

If the file saves to my C drive in Windows XP Professional,
I don't pay particular attention to the length of the file name
that I've used.

But in trying to COPY large files (e.g., a folder holding tens
of thousands of sub-folders, with 2GB of saved data), most
copying programs that I've encountered -- on 250 GB Maxtor
external hard drives, on 40 GB HP external hard drives,
on 2 GB Lexar flash drives -- not only will NOT COPY
a file with an overly-long file name, but they also TERMINATE
THE ENTIRE COPYING PROCESS INSTANTLY, merely on
hitting a single too-long file name.

Going into huge saved data files MANUALLY and MANUALLY
reducing the length of each long file name is impossible.

That's why we have COMPUTERS AND PROGRAMS:
to automate important but tedious tasks and processes.

I am hoping that someone somewhere has
AN AUTOMATIC FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM,
or subroutine -- that could be run through my entire C drive
prior to attempting to copy large files, or, even better,
that could be run ON-THE-FLY in conjunction with any
file-copying process, and that could truncate overly-long
file names on-the-fly, as they are encountered, to permit the
standard file-copying routines or algorithms to proceed
without stopping, and even without losing those particular files
with overlong names.

IS THERE SUCH A FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM?

If so, how can I get an operational version, both for XP Professional
and for XP Media Center?

I'd have thought that this sub-routine would have been the most
obvious thing in the world for MICROSOFT itself to have
incorporated into Windows.

But if it's available in Windows XP Professional or in XP Media Center,
I'm not aware of it.
August 17, 2005 4:39:01 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

You dont want that. Changing the names of file names may make them unfindable
by the OS.

Like if i changed system critical file
'zxczxczxczxczxczxczcxzxczxczxczxczxc.sys' to 'zxc.sys', bad things will
happen.
--
To err is human, but to really foul things up, you need a computer.


"EverymanEndUser" wrote:

> I tend to use long file names, so as to identify needed files readily.
>
> If the file saves to my C drive in Windows XP Professional,
> I don't pay particular attention to the length of the file name
> that I've used.
>
> But in trying to COPY large files (e.g., a folder holding tens
> of thousands of sub-folders, with 2GB of saved data), most
> copying programs that I've encountered -- on 250 GB Maxtor
> external hard drives, on 40 GB HP external hard drives,
> on 2 GB Lexar flash drives -- not only will NOT COPY
> a file with an overly-long file name, but they also TERMINATE
> THE ENTIRE COPYING PROCESS INSTANTLY, merely on
> hitting a single too-long file name.
>
> Going into huge saved data files MANUALLY and MANUALLY
> reducing the length of each long file name is impossible.
>
> That's why we have COMPUTERS AND PROGRAMS:
> to automate important but tedious tasks and processes.
>
> I am hoping that someone somewhere has
> AN AUTOMATIC FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM,
> or subroutine -- that could be run through my entire C drive
> prior to attempting to copy large files, or, even better,
> that could be run ON-THE-FLY in conjunction with any
> file-copying process, and that could truncate overly-long
> file names on-the-fly, as they are encountered, to permit the
> standard file-copying routines or algorithms to proceed
> without stopping, and even without losing those particular files
> with overlong names.
>
> IS THERE SUCH A FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM?
>
> If so, how can I get an operational version, both for XP Professional
> and for XP Media Center?
>
> I'd have thought that this sub-routine would have been the most
> obvious thing in the world for MICROSOFT itself to have
> incorporated into Windows.
>
> But if it's available in Windows XP Professional or in XP Media Center,
> I'm not aware of it.
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 1:56:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Thanks, Tim, for the warning.

Are there any automatic batch file-renaming programs
or sub-routines available that might preserve
system-critical links?

Or have I gotten myself into a predicament from which there is no
safe escape?

EverymanEndUser




"Tim" wrote:

> You dont want that. Changing the names of file names may make them unfindable
> by the OS.
>
> Like if i changed system critical file
> 'zxczxczxczxczxczxczcxzxczxczxczxczxc.sys' to 'zxc.sys', bad things will
> happen.
> --
> To err is human, but to really foul things up, you need a computer.
>
>
> "EverymanEndUser" wrote:
>
> > I tend to use long file names, so as to identify needed files readily.
> >
> > If the file saves to my C drive in Windows XP Professional,
> > I don't pay particular attention to the length of the file name
> > that I've used.
> >
> > But in trying to COPY large files (e.g., a folder holding tens
> > of thousands of sub-folders, with 2GB of saved data), most
> > copying programs that I've encountered -- on 250 GB Maxtor
> > external hard drives, on 40 GB HP external hard drives,
> > on 2 GB Lexar flash drives -- not only will NOT COPY
> > a file with an overly-long file name, but they also TERMINATE
> > THE ENTIRE COPYING PROCESS INSTANTLY, merely on
> > hitting a single too-long file name.
> >
> > Going into huge saved data files MANUALLY and MANUALLY
> > reducing the length of each long file name is impossible.
> >
> > That's why we have COMPUTERS AND PROGRAMS:
> > to automate important but tedious tasks and processes.
> >
> > I am hoping that someone somewhere has
> > AN AUTOMATIC FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM,
> > or subroutine -- that could be run through my entire C drive
> > prior to attempting to copy large files, or, even better,
> > that could be run ON-THE-FLY in conjunction with any
> > file-copying process, and that could truncate overly-long
> > file names on-the-fly, as they are encountered, to permit the
> > standard file-copying routines or algorithms to proceed
> > without stopping, and even without losing those particular files
> > with overlong names.
> >
> > IS THERE SUCH A FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM?
> >
> > If so, how can I get an operational version, both for XP Professional
> > and for XP Media Center?
> >
> > I'd have thought that this sub-routine would have been the most
> > obvious thing in the world for MICROSOFT itself to have
> > incorporated into Windows.
> >
> > But if it's available in Windows XP Professional or in XP Media Center,
> > I'm not aware of it.
Related resources
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 2:08:01 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Just checking.
Is it definitely the file names that are too long?
Can you shorten the names of all the folders so that the file path is shorter?
Only time i've ever had trouble copying long named files is when the file
path was itself too long

"EverymanEndUser" wrote:

> Thanks, Tim, for the warning.
>
> Are there any automatic batch file-renaming programs
> or sub-routines available that might preserve
> system-critical links?
>
> Or have I gotten myself into a predicament from which there is no
> safe escape?
>
> EverymanEndUser
>
>
>
>
> "Tim" wrote:
>
> > You dont want that. Changing the names of file names may make them unfindable
> > by the OS.
> >
> > Like if i changed system critical file
> > 'zxczxczxczxczxczxczcxzxczxczxczxczxc.sys' to 'zxc.sys', bad things will
> > happen.
> > --
> > To err is human, but to really foul things up, you need a computer.
> >
> >
> > "EverymanEndUser" wrote:
> >
> > > I tend to use long file names, so as to identify needed files readily.
> > >
> > > If the file saves to my C drive in Windows XP Professional,
> > > I don't pay particular attention to the length of the file name
> > > that I've used.
> > >
> > > But in trying to COPY large files (e.g., a folder holding tens
> > > of thousands of sub-folders, with 2GB of saved data), most
> > > copying programs that I've encountered -- on 250 GB Maxtor
> > > external hard drives, on 40 GB HP external hard drives,
> > > on 2 GB Lexar flash drives -- not only will NOT COPY
> > > a file with an overly-long file name, but they also TERMINATE
> > > THE ENTIRE COPYING PROCESS INSTANTLY, merely on
> > > hitting a single too-long file name.
> > >
> > > Going into huge saved data files MANUALLY and MANUALLY
> > > reducing the length of each long file name is impossible.
> > >
> > > That's why we have COMPUTERS AND PROGRAMS:
> > > to automate important but tedious tasks and processes.
> > >
> > > I am hoping that someone somewhere has
> > > AN AUTOMATIC FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM,
> > > or subroutine -- that could be run through my entire C drive
> > > prior to attempting to copy large files, or, even better,
> > > that could be run ON-THE-FLY in conjunction with any
> > > file-copying process, and that could truncate overly-long
> > > file names on-the-fly, as they are encountered, to permit the
> > > standard file-copying routines or algorithms to proceed
> > > without stopping, and even without losing those particular files
> > > with overlong names.
> > >
> > > IS THERE SUCH A FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM?
> > >
> > > If so, how can I get an operational version, both for XP Professional
> > > and for XP Media Center?
> > >
> > > I'd have thought that this sub-routine would have been the most
> > > obvious thing in the world for MICROSOFT itself to have
> > > incorporated into Windows.
> > >
> > > But if it's available in Windows XP Professional or in XP Media Center,
> > > I'm not aware of it.
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 6:28:30 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Good suggestion.

It may well be the case that, in many instances, my folder names are too long,
or just over-long enough that -- in combination with my long file names,
I've produced file paths of undigestible length.

The problem remains, though, because, in my major folders,
I commonly have tens of thousands of sub-folders -- making
a manual correction of years of folder-misnaming also an impossibility.

I suspect that you're right about at least a portion of my folders.
[Though my folder names tend to be far shorter than my file names.]

But given the immense number of folders, I'll need an automatic
batch-renaming program or subroutine for the folder names as well!

Two overall questions for anyone who might know, or who could point me
in the right direction to find out:

[1] What specific character length of pathnames does FAT32 permit?
I'm thinking specifically of the whole C:\xxx...XXX pathname?
Is that common for all FAT32 systems, or are some more fault-tolerant
than others? What about other common file systems, other than NTFS?


[2] Are there any commercially available NTFS-based file systems
in use in any widely produced mass storage device?


EverymanEndUser






"Devious" wrote:

> Just checking.
> Is it definitely the file names that are too long?
> Can you shorten the names of all the folders so that the file path is shorter?
> Only time i've ever had trouble copying long named files is when the file
> path was itself too long
>
> "EverymanEndUser" wrote:
>
> > Thanks, Tim, for the warning.
> >
> > Are there any automatic batch file-renaming programs
> > or sub-routines available that might preserve
> > system-critical links?
> >
> > Or have I gotten myself into a predicament from which there is no
> > safe escape?
> >
> > EverymanEndUser
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > "Tim" wrote:
> >
> > > You dont want that. Changing the names of file names may make them unfindable
> > > by the OS.
> > >
> > > Like if i changed system critical file
> > > 'zxczxczxczxczxczxczcxzxczxczxczxczxc.sys' to 'zxc.sys', bad things will
> > > happen.
> > > --
> > > To err is human, but to really foul things up, you need a computer.
> > >
> > >
> > > "EverymanEndUser" wrote:
> > >
> > > > I tend to use long file names, so as to identify needed files readily.
> > > >
> > > > If the file saves to my C drive in Windows XP Professional,
> > > > I don't pay particular attention to the length of the file name
> > > > that I've used.
> > > >
> > > > But in trying to COPY large files (e.g., a folder holding tens
> > > > of thousands of sub-folders, with 2GB of saved data), most
> > > > copying programs that I've encountered -- on 250 GB Maxtor
> > > > external hard drives, on 40 GB HP external hard drives,
> > > > on 2 GB Lexar flash drives -- not only will NOT COPY
> > > > a file with an overly-long file name, but they also TERMINATE
> > > > THE ENTIRE COPYING PROCESS INSTANTLY, merely on
> > > > hitting a single too-long file name.
> > > >
> > > > Going into huge saved data files MANUALLY and MANUALLY
> > > > reducing the length of each long file name is impossible.
> > > >
> > > > That's why we have COMPUTERS AND PROGRAMS:
> > > > to automate important but tedious tasks and processes.
> > > >
> > > > I am hoping that someone somewhere has
> > > > AN AUTOMATIC FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM,
> > > > or subroutine -- that could be run through my entire C drive
> > > > prior to attempting to copy large files, or, even better,
> > > > that could be run ON-THE-FLY in conjunction with any
> > > > file-copying process, and that could truncate overly-long
> > > > file names on-the-fly, as they are encountered, to permit the
> > > > standard file-copying routines or algorithms to proceed
> > > > without stopping, and even without losing those particular files
> > > > with overlong names.
> > > >
> > > > IS THERE SUCH A FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM?
> > > >
> > > > If so, how can I get an operational version, both for XP Professional
> > > > and for XP Media Center?
> > > >
> > > > I'd have thought that this sub-routine would have been the most
> > > > obvious thing in the world for MICROSOFT itself to have
> > > > incorporated into Windows.
> > > >
> > > > But if it's available in Windows XP Professional or in XP Media Center,
> > > > I'm not aware of it.
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 2:13:04 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

EverymanEndUser wrote:
> I tend to use long file names, so as to identify needed files readily.
>
> If the file saves to my C drive in Windows XP Professional,
> I don't pay particular attention to the length of the file name
> that I've used.
>
> But in trying to COPY large files (e.g., a folder holding tens
> of thousands of sub-folders, with 2GB of saved data), most
> copying programs that I've encountered -- on 250 GB Maxtor
> external hard drives, on 40 GB HP external hard drives,
> on 2 GB Lexar flash drives -- not only will NOT COPY
> a file with an overly-long file name, but they also TERMINATE
> THE ENTIRE COPYING PROCESS INSTANTLY, merely on
> hitting a single too-long file name.
>
> Going into huge saved data files MANUALLY and MANUALLY
> reducing the length of each long file name is impossible.
>
> That's why we have COMPUTERS AND PROGRAMS:
> to automate important but tedious tasks and processes.
>
> I am hoping that someone somewhere has
> AN AUTOMATIC FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM,
> or subroutine -- that could be run through my entire C drive
> prior to attempting to copy large files, or, even better,
> that could be run ON-THE-FLY in conjunction with any
> file-copying process, and that could truncate overly-long
> file names on-the-fly, as they are encountered, to permit the
> standard file-copying routines or algorithms to proceed
> without stopping, and even without losing those particular files
> with overlong names.
>
> IS THERE SUCH A FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM?
>
> If so, how can I get an operational version, both for XP Professional
> and for XP Media Center?
>
> I'd have thought that this sub-routine would have been the most
> obvious thing in the world for MICROSOFT itself to have
> incorporated into Windows.
>
> But if it's available in Windows XP Professional or in XP Media Center,
> I'm not aware of it.

-----------------------

If you were to just truncate file names, wouldn't you end up with duplicate
names? Don't you have stuff like LONGFILENAME1, LONGFILENAME2, etc., which are
differentiated only in the trailing characters?

How did you create these file names in the first place? Given so many I presume
they're not all names you typed in manually, but rather some application created
them. If so, is there a spreadsheet or some application accessing them which
will throw it's hands up in confusion if you rename them all from XP rather than
from the app? Did a common Office app create them, or something more esoteric?

Bill
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 2:13:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

In order to be sure that I could copy, save, and protect
my files, I'd be willing to put up with the similarities in names,
post-truncation. (By context, I could pretty well figure out
what was in most post-namelength-truncation files.)

I'd still be far better off than with the cryptic DOS-like
file names.

As for culpability -- alas! It is all my own.

I'm doing research for a number of major projects,
so I tend to use very long file names to specify for my own
later use precisely what's included in a particular file
or folder.

For this particular problem, I've run my own ship aground.

That why I'm hoping someone else can help to advcise me
on how to re-launch.

EverymanEndUser




"Bill Martin -- (Remove NOSPAM from addre" wrote:

> EverymanEndUser wrote:
> > I tend to use long file names, so as to identify needed files readily.
> >
> > If the file saves to my C drive in Windows XP Professional,
> > I don't pay particular attention to the length of the file name
> > that I've used.
> >
> > But in trying to COPY large files (e.g., a folder holding tens
> > of thousands of sub-folders, with 2GB of saved data), most
> > copying programs that I've encountered -- on 250 GB Maxtor
> > external hard drives, on 40 GB HP external hard drives,
> > on 2 GB Lexar flash drives -- not only will NOT COPY
> > a file with an overly-long file name, but they also TERMINATE
> > THE ENTIRE COPYING PROCESS INSTANTLY, merely on
> > hitting a single too-long file name.
> >
> > Going into huge saved data files MANUALLY and MANUALLY
> > reducing the length of each long file name is impossible.
> >
> > That's why we have COMPUTERS AND PROGRAMS:
> > to automate important but tedious tasks and processes.
> >
> > I am hoping that someone somewhere has
> > AN AUTOMATIC FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM,
> > or subroutine -- that could be run through my entire C drive
> > prior to attempting to copy large files, or, even better,
> > that could be run ON-THE-FLY in conjunction with any
> > file-copying process, and that could truncate overly-long
> > file names on-the-fly, as they are encountered, to permit the
> > standard file-copying routines or algorithms to proceed
> > without stopping, and even without losing those particular files
> > with overlong names.
> >
> > IS THERE SUCH A FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM?
> >
> > If so, how can I get an operational version, both for XP Professional
> > and for XP Media Center?
> >
> > I'd have thought that this sub-routine would have been the most
> > obvious thing in the world for MICROSOFT itself to have
> > incorporated into Windows.
> >
> > But if it's available in Windows XP Professional or in XP Media Center,
> > I'm not aware of it.
>
> -----------------------
>
> If you were to just truncate file names, wouldn't you end up with duplicate
> names? Don't you have stuff like LONGFILENAME1, LONGFILENAME2, etc., which are
> differentiated only in the trailing characters?
>
> How did you create these file names in the first place? Given so many I presume
> they're not all names you typed in manually, but rather some application created
> them. If so, is there a spreadsheet or some application accessing them which
> will throw it's hands up in confusion if you rename them all from XP rather than
> from the app? Did a common Office app create them, or something more esoteric?
>
> Bill
>
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 2:13:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Quick Google on: file renamer batch
reveals a few thousand ref. here's the first on that looked like it might do
what you want:
http://www.softforall.com/Utilities/FileDisk/Batch_File...

but there's bound to be a zillion more.

The one above is free...I haven't tried it, therefore this is not
recommendation of this product (disclamer :-)



"EverymanEndUser" <EverymanEndUser@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
message news:2F9463FB-F4AD-4C16-BB32-FE85446E869B@microsoft.com...
> In order to be sure that I could copy, save, and protect
> my files, I'd be willing to put up with the similarities in names,
> post-truncation. (By context, I could pretty well figure out
> what was in most post-namelength-truncation files.)
>
> I'd still be far better off than with the cryptic DOS-like
> file names.
>
> As for culpability -- alas! It is all my own.
>
> I'm doing research for a number of major projects,
> so I tend to use very long file names to specify for my own
> later use precisely what's included in a particular file
> or folder.
>
> For this particular problem, I've run my own ship aground.
>
> That why I'm hoping someone else can help to advcise me
> on how to re-launch.
>
> EverymanEndUser
>
>
>
>
> "Bill Martin -- (Remove NOSPAM from addre" wrote:
>
>> EverymanEndUser wrote:
>> > I tend to use long file names, so as to identify needed files readily.
>> >
>> > If the file saves to my C drive in Windows XP Professional,
>> > I don't pay particular attention to the length of the file name
>> > that I've used.
>> >
>> > But in trying to COPY large files (e.g., a folder holding tens
>> > of thousands of sub-folders, with 2GB of saved data), most
>> > copying programs that I've encountered -- on 250 GB Maxtor
>> > external hard drives, on 40 GB HP external hard drives,
>> > on 2 GB Lexar flash drives -- not only will NOT COPY
>> > a file with an overly-long file name, but they also TERMINATE
>> > THE ENTIRE COPYING PROCESS INSTANTLY, merely on
>> > hitting a single too-long file name.
>> >
>> > Going into huge saved data files MANUALLY and MANUALLY
>> > reducing the length of each long file name is impossible.
>> >
>> > That's why we have COMPUTERS AND PROGRAMS:
>> > to automate important but tedious tasks and processes.
>> >
>> > I am hoping that someone somewhere has
>> > AN AUTOMATIC FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM,
>> > or subroutine -- that could be run through my entire C drive
>> > prior to attempting to copy large files, or, even better,
>> > that could be run ON-THE-FLY in conjunction with any
>> > file-copying process, and that could truncate overly-long
>> > file names on-the-fly, as they are encountered, to permit the
>> > standard file-copying routines or algorithms to proceed
>> > without stopping, and even without losing those particular files
>> > with overlong names.
>> >
>> > IS THERE SUCH A FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM?
>> >
>> > If so, how can I get an operational version, both for XP Professional
>> > and for XP Media Center?
>> >
>> > I'd have thought that this sub-routine would have been the most
>> > obvious thing in the world for MICROSOFT itself to have
>> > incorporated into Windows.
>> >
>> > But if it's available in Windows XP Professional or in XP Media Center,
>> > I'm not aware of it.
>>
>> -----------------------
>>
>> If you were to just truncate file names, wouldn't you end up with
>> duplicate
>> names? Don't you have stuff like LONGFILENAME1, LONGFILENAME2, etc.,
>> which are
>> differentiated only in the trailing characters?
>>
>> How did you create these file names in the first place? Given so many I
>> presume
>> they're not all names you typed in manually, but rather some application
>> created
>> them. If so, is there a spreadsheet or some application accessing them
>> which
>> will throw it's hands up in confusion if you rename them all from XP
>> rather than
>> from the app? Did a common Office app create them, or something more
>> esoteric?
>>
>> Bill
>>
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 2:13:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Thanks, Rob, for the suggestion.

I'll follow it up.

In the interim, anyone know of any commercially available
NTFS-based mass storage devices (even in the low-terrabyte
range) that might not be excruciatingly unaffordable for
a lone end-user like myself -- and that would still work
with my primary XP Professional system?

EverymanEndUser




"Rob Giordano (Crash)" wrote:

> Quick Google on: file renamer batch
> reveals a few thousand ref. here's the first on that looked like it might do
> what you want:
> http://www.softforall.com/Utilities/FileDisk/Batch_File...
>
> but there's bound to be a zillion more.
>
> The one above is free...I haven't tried it, therefore this is not
> recommendation of this product (disclamer :-)
>
>
>
> "EverymanEndUser" <EverymanEndUser@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
> message news:2F9463FB-F4AD-4C16-BB32-FE85446E869B@microsoft.com...
> > In order to be sure that I could copy, save, and protect
> > my files, I'd be willing to put up with the similarities in names,
> > post-truncation. (By context, I could pretty well figure out
> > what was in most post-namelength-truncation files.)
> >
> > I'd still be far better off than with the cryptic DOS-like
> > file names.
> >
> > As for culpability -- alas! It is all my own.
> >
> > I'm doing research for a number of major projects,
> > so I tend to use very long file names to specify for my own
> > later use precisely what's included in a particular file
> > or folder.
> >
> > For this particular problem, I've run my own ship aground.
> >
> > That why I'm hoping someone else can help to advcise me
> > on how to re-launch.
> >
> > EverymanEndUser
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > "Bill Martin -- (Remove NOSPAM from addre" wrote:
> >
> >> EverymanEndUser wrote:
> >> > I tend to use long file names, so as to identify needed files readily.
> >> >
> >> > If the file saves to my C drive in Windows XP Professional,
> >> > I don't pay particular attention to the length of the file name
> >> > that I've used.
> >> >
> >> > But in trying to COPY large files (e.g., a folder holding tens
> >> > of thousands of sub-folders, with 2GB of saved data), most
> >> > copying programs that I've encountered -- on 250 GB Maxtor
> >> > external hard drives, on 40 GB HP external hard drives,
> >> > on 2 GB Lexar flash drives -- not only will NOT COPY
> >> > a file with an overly-long file name, but they also TERMINATE
> >> > THE ENTIRE COPYING PROCESS INSTANTLY, merely on
> >> > hitting a single too-long file name.
> >> >
> >> > Going into huge saved data files MANUALLY and MANUALLY
> >> > reducing the length of each long file name is impossible.
> >> >
> >> > That's why we have COMPUTERS AND PROGRAMS:
> >> > to automate important but tedious tasks and processes.
> >> >
> >> > I am hoping that someone somewhere has
> >> > AN AUTOMATIC FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM,
> >> > or subroutine -- that could be run through my entire C drive
> >> > prior to attempting to copy large files, or, even better,
> >> > that could be run ON-THE-FLY in conjunction with any
> >> > file-copying process, and that could truncate overly-long
> >> > file names on-the-fly, as they are encountered, to permit the
> >> > standard file-copying routines or algorithms to proceed
> >> > without stopping, and even without losing those particular files
> >> > with overlong names.
> >> >
> >> > IS THERE SUCH A FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM?
> >> >
> >> > If so, how can I get an operational version, both for XP Professional
> >> > and for XP Media Center?
> >> >
> >> > I'd have thought that this sub-routine would have been the most
> >> > obvious thing in the world for MICROSOFT itself to have
> >> > incorporated into Windows.
> >> >
> >> > But if it's available in Windows XP Professional or in XP Media Center,
> >> > I'm not aware of it.
> >>
> >> -----------------------
> >>
> >> If you were to just truncate file names, wouldn't you end up with
> >> duplicate
> >> names? Don't you have stuff like LONGFILENAME1, LONGFILENAME2, etc.,
> >> which are
> >> differentiated only in the trailing characters?
> >>
> >> How did you create these file names in the first place? Given so many I
> >> presume
> >> they're not all names you typed in manually, but rather some application
> >> created
> >> them. If so, is there a spreadsheet or some application accessing them
> >> which
> >> will throw it's hands up in confusion if you rename them all from XP
> >> rather than
> >> from the app? Did a common Office app create them, or something more
> >> esoteric?
> >>
> >> Bill
> >>
>
>
>
October 9, 2012 10:15:53 AM

Rewrite this dialouge in indirect speech ?
!