Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Raid 0 (Striping) Missing Drive

Last response: in Storage
Share
September 22, 2009 1:04:46 AM

Hardware:
EVGA 780i SLI mobo
2x Seagate 1TB Drive, model# ST31000528AS
1x Seagate 1TB Drive, model# ST31000333AS
Intel Q6600 @ 3ghz

OS: Win7 Ultimate x64

Okay, essentially what I'm seeing here is that while the BIOS / Raid utility in bios sees all three drives and assigns the array to have 2.7 TB of space.

The OS sees a total of roughly 2TB of space. What's going on here?

My only guesses are either the Nvidia drivers don't like the different model # drives or that win7 can't deal with >2tb of space on a single HD. Neither seems extremely likely.

Appreciate any help given.
Edit/Delete Message
a b G Storage
September 22, 2009 9:29:00 AM

Do you remember how you built the array? You didn't change any capacity specifications or anything?
m
0
l
September 22, 2009 12:11:09 PM

Raid 0 can consist of 2 or 4 identical drives not 3 drives. This is perhaps the reason that the O.S. only "sees" 2TB. You may want to look at this to determine what raid array that you want to set up: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAID
m
0
l
Related resources
September 29, 2009 12:01:37 AM

shabaa said:
Raid 0 can consist of 2 or 4 identical drives not 3 drives. This is perhaps the reason that the O.S. only "sees" 2TB. You may want to look at this to determine what raid array that you want to set up: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAID



Dear sir (or madam).
You are completely wrong.
RAID 0 combines two or more discs to create a volume with the combined capacity of the discs and increase the read/write speed of the total array compared to a single drive. RAID 0 is nonredundant.
You are thinking of RAID 1, which is full parity. As in, there are two complete copies of your data, for redundancy.
Perhaps you should read this article to determine where you went wrong:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAID


As it turns out, the problem was with MBR partitioning, which has an upper limit of 2tb of space per drive or array, regardless of actual physical size. Changing the format to GPT, the GUID partition table, fixed the issue.

Thanks for your responses, however (I figured it out and forgot to update this thread.)
m
0
l
a c 127 G Storage
September 29, 2009 12:11:56 PM

Indeed fdisk-partitions are maximum 2TiB, while the newer GPT partitions can go beyond that. This is an industry-wide limitation of fdisk partitions. Also, to access the data beyond 2TiB you need a 64-bit LBA capable OS - which doesn't have anything to do with 32-bit/64-bit windows version by the way.
m
0
l
!